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New York Philharmonic Performance Interrupted By Cell Phone

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Poll: New York Philharmonic Performance Interrupted By Cell Phone (13 member(s) have cast votes)

Did Alan Gilbert do the right thing by stopping the music for a cell phone?

  1. Yes, absolutely. (10 votes [76.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 76.92%

  2. No. Trudge onward! (2 votes [15.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.38%

  3. Maybe. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. I don't know/No Opinion (1 votes [7.69%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.69%

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#1
Tokkemon

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On Tuesday a very rare thing happened: conductor Alan Gilbert of the New York Philharmonic put down his baton and stopped the music after a patron's cell phone kept ringing in a performance of Mahler 9.

http://www.foxnews.c...ic-performance/

The story is also available in many different news outlets.

What do you think of the situation? Did Gilbert to the right thing? Should there be more measures to limit technological devices in the hall? Share your thoughts.

#2
Austenite

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What Allan Gilbert did was absolutely right. He was just demanding respect for himself, the NYPO... and Mahler!!!!!!!!

I only wish it had been the Sixth Symphony instead of the Ninth. Thus he could have used one of the hammerschlags on the cell phone and the other one(s) on its owner.

"Let the composers say what they really want to say, not what anyone thinks they should be saying". Leonard Bernstein.

Works available on this site:

 

Eileen's Song, Op. 35b (A Song Without Words) NEW!  - for piano solo. September 2014.

Habanera (for a Playful Kid) NEW! - for string orchestra. February 2014.

Romance and Variations, Op. 4 - for piano solo. November 2013 (also available in a live recording by fellow YC member Sonataform).

Piano Sonata No. 4 in E minor, Op. 25 (Northanger Sonata) - Most Outstanding Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Emma Overture, Op. 31 - Top Orchestral Composition, YC Awards 2012.
Adriana Suite, Op. 27: first two movements, Adriana's Waltz, fourth and fifth movements - Top Incidental Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Jabberwocky, Op. 28 No. 1 - Top Vocal/Choral Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Other orchestral works: Waltz (second movement from my Third Symphony in G minor, Op. 29)El Cadejos, Op. 38, Northanger Overture, Op. 25b, Christmas at Newtown.

Other works for piano solo: Piano Sonata No. 3 in C, Op. 23, Nocturne in G minor, Op. 18, Epigram in C (from Six Piano Pieces, Op. 3)

Other chamber works: String Serenade, Op. 11, Playful Dreams, Op. 26 N° 2 for oboe and piano, Souvenir from Pemberley, Op. 32, Quiet Thoughts, Op. 30, Four Apologies for Cello Solo, Op. 33.


#3
Elizabeth

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It irks me to no end when things like this happen in performances. I think he should have had the man thrown out....I mean seriously. You come to a freaking concert and don't turn off your phone???????

~Liz
 

Old-timer member, original Queen of YC (new gen), yadda yadda... Yeah. I'm kind of a big deal. 


#4
SYS65

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He should have done this:


Daniel Muñoz AlfĂ©rez - Official YC Mahlerian  


#5
Austenite

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SYS65: no doubt this guy deserved the 'third blow'.

"Let the composers say what they really want to say, not what anyone thinks they should be saying". Leonard Bernstein.

Works available on this site:

 

Eileen's Song, Op. 35b (A Song Without Words) NEW!  - for piano solo. September 2014.

Habanera (for a Playful Kid) NEW! - for string orchestra. February 2014.

Romance and Variations, Op. 4 - for piano solo. November 2013 (also available in a live recording by fellow YC member Sonataform).

Piano Sonata No. 4 in E minor, Op. 25 (Northanger Sonata) - Most Outstanding Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Emma Overture, Op. 31 - Top Orchestral Composition, YC Awards 2012.
Adriana Suite, Op. 27: first two movements, Adriana's Waltz, fourth and fifth movements - Top Incidental Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Jabberwocky, Op. 28 No. 1 - Top Vocal/Choral Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Other orchestral works: Waltz (second movement from my Third Symphony in G minor, Op. 29)El Cadejos, Op. 38, Northanger Overture, Op. 25b, Christmas at Newtown.

Other works for piano solo: Piano Sonata No. 3 in C, Op. 23, Nocturne in G minor, Op. 18, Epigram in C (from Six Piano Pieces, Op. 3)

Other chamber works: String Serenade, Op. 11, Playful Dreams, Op. 26 N° 2 for oboe and piano, Souvenir from Pemberley, Op. 32, Quiet Thoughts, Op. 30, Four Apologies for Cello Solo, Op. 33.


#6
SYS65

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Oh yes, if it would have been the 6th, conductor says to percussionist, "come on man, go and use the hammer with him" haha

was in the 9th Adagio ? that's a mortal sin

Daniel Muñoz AlfĂ©rez - Official YC Mahlerian  


#7
Austenite

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was in the 9th Adagio ? that's a mortal sin


Tantamouts to blasphemy in fact.

"Let the composers say what they really want to say, not what anyone thinks they should be saying". Leonard Bernstein.

Works available on this site:

 

Eileen's Song, Op. 35b (A Song Without Words) NEW!  - for piano solo. September 2014.

Habanera (for a Playful Kid) NEW! - for string orchestra. February 2014.

Romance and Variations, Op. 4 - for piano solo. November 2013 (also available in a live recording by fellow YC member Sonataform).

Piano Sonata No. 4 in E minor, Op. 25 (Northanger Sonata) - Most Outstanding Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Emma Overture, Op. 31 - Top Orchestral Composition, YC Awards 2012.
Adriana Suite, Op. 27: first two movements, Adriana's Waltz, fourth and fifth movements - Top Incidental Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Jabberwocky, Op. 28 No. 1 - Top Vocal/Choral Composition, YC Awards 2012.

Other orchestral works: Waltz (second movement from my Third Symphony in G minor, Op. 29)El Cadejos, Op. 38, Northanger Overture, Op. 25b, Christmas at Newtown.

Other works for piano solo: Piano Sonata No. 3 in C, Op. 23, Nocturne in G minor, Op. 18, Epigram in C (from Six Piano Pieces, Op. 3)

Other chamber works: String Serenade, Op. 11, Playful Dreams, Op. 26 N° 2 for oboe and piano, Souvenir from Pemberley, Op. 32, Quiet Thoughts, Op. 30, Four Apologies for Cello Solo, Op. 33.


#8
Ian

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There's no need to get self-righteous and overreact, guys. I thought what the conductor did was a little overkill. It's a pretty trivial thing to discuss either way.

#9
calebhines

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As usual, there's more than one side to a story. If his story can be trusted, he had put the phone in silent mode. The technology's design and user experience are at least partly to blame here (as well as the man's unfamiliarity with a new device). I mean, who would expect a device in "silent" mode to be capable of making sound?

Of course, after you learn about those kind of quirks, you realize that just being muted isn't enough. Of course, I turn mine fully off when I'm at the symphony.

#10
J. Lee Graham

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As usual, there's more than one side to a story. If his story can be trusted, he had put the phone in silent mode. The technology's design and user experience are at least partly to blame here (as well as the man's unfamiliarity with a new device). I mean, who would expect a device in "silent" mode to be capable of making sound?

Of course, after you learn about those kind of quirks, you realize that just being muted isn't enough. Of course, I turn mine fully off when I'm at the symphony.


For precisely this reason, at times like this, and even when I'm in a rehearsal, I leave my phone locked in the glove compartment of my car. Something like this happened to me once: I had set my phone to silent during a service at church, and inexplicably the alarm went off. Turns out that the device was designed to override the silent setting when the alarm clock kicks in - most inconvenient in my case, but I can see why it does it. Since you never know when something like that is going to happen, whether the device itself does it for some reason, or you accidentally hit a button while it's in your pocket, or whatever, maybe it's best to just leave the phone somewhere else if you can.

http://www.soundclick.com/jleegraham

"I have no need for someone infected with the paralysis of analysis." - Brandon Homayouni





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