luderart

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luderart last won the day on February 11

luderart had the most liked content!

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About luderart

  • Rank
    Aspiring Amateur composer

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lebanon
  • Occupation
    Psychologist
  • Interests
    Chess, Scrabble,
  • Favorite Composers
    Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Cherubini, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Dvorak, Franck, Khachaturian, Part, Mansurian
  • My Compositional Styles
    Short aphoristic pieces for various instruments (mainly solo)
  • Notation Software/Sequencers
    Sibelius 6
  • Instruments Played
    Cello

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. Not yet. I prefer to start something first. Then I will tell you.
  2. Thanks. I'll see if I can come up with something. Another question: Can the instrumentation change between one photograph and the next that I use?
  3. The photograph I had used was of nature. Sorry, I am not familiar with Carly Shearman's work.
  4. Or 5-9! Question: What about photography? Can it be used as the art? I had long ago used one of my photographs in one of my pieces where the piece was conceived of as a musical depiction of the scene in the photograph. That is why I am asking.
  5. Thanks Luis & Monarcheon for your reviews. Indeed the economy of the piece is a bit sparse. To me that is a matter of subjective composer language of using an ensemble. But I agree with the criticism and that the economy of the pieces might be considered a weakness in these pieces. I think that is a great idea. I never thought about it that way. But I saw an octet in which the players had sat symmetrically. Where would I add such directions on the score? Yes, sententiae are supposed to be short. Here is a description of the 'sententia' from January 18, 2017, that I just edited: The 'sententia' is a musical form I originated in 2013. The word 'sententia' (plural: 'sententiae') is the Latin for the word 'sentence'. The Oxford dictionary defines 'sententia' as "A pithy or memorable saying, a maxim, an aphorism, an epigram; a thought, a reflection." For me a 'sententia' is a musical utterance of a thought that is complete in itself, like a sentence. It is also an utterance that finds no need for any elaboration or development. Hence my sententiae are short pieces that come in sets and are often related to each other in some way. Just like between the movements of a multi-movement piece, I would expect that performers observe a short pause between one sententia and the next. And I would expect that there be no clapping from audiences.
  6. These are my "Three Sententiae for String Octet, Op. 299". They are my first composition ever for the string octet ensemble. I think I have rather succeeded in composing music fit for the particular characteristics of the string octet ensemble. I would be interested to hear your reviews.
  7. I echo Maarten's opinion. Twice I tried to listen and twice, I couldn't go beyond about half a minute. I certainly don't enjoy so much repetition! It feels like an insult to the audience's intelligence. And just the fact that you acknowledge that some might think it garbage doesn't necessarily prevent that from being so. And likewise, I wouldn't think that presenting it as a challenge to the audience would save the piece! To be fair, I think that a human performance might of course help the piece by introducing subtle differences where none exist in a computer performance. If you explained your rationale for the piece - what you have set out to accomplish in it - that might have encouraged a bigger audience to invest in the piece by listening to the end.
  8. Hi Maarten. It sounds like a very interesting modern piece for saxophone quartet. I think the music fits the ensemble very well. And it is great that the quartet members are collaborating with you! I look forward to hearing the live performance. Congratulations.
  9. Thanks Monarcheon and Gustav for your reviews. I am glad that you have liked the piece! Gustav, it's great to hear that you appreciate my style of composition.
  10. Moving piece, full of memory, emotion, sadness. My condolences to you. What type of dog was Byron?
  11. To me it sounds like film music, from an old movie. It is nice, relaxing music. Try to search it here: http://www.musipedia.org/
  12. Hi Maarten, No music can be heard on my browser. Perhaps you forgot to attach the recording?
  13. Coming on the heels of my first soliloquy for trumpet, my "Soliloquy for Trumpet No. 2", the idea for which preceded its composition, is an attempt to depict the last trumpet the Bible tells us will sound at the second coming of Christ as described in verses such as the following: "... for the trumpet shall sound and the dead shall be raised incorruptible and we shall all be changed." 1 Corinthians 15:52 (see also 1 Thessalonians 4:16). I don't know how far this piece has succeeded to approximate that trumpet's true sound, music, and of course, its powerful impact. Only God knows - and our imaginations can imagine and judge!
  14. I had somehow avoided composing for the trumpet for many years, perhaps because my first composition for it, back in 1997, although perhaps unrealistically difficult for actual performance, I regarded as maybe my best composition, and perhaps with a supernaturalistic fear, I avoided to compose for trumpet for fear that I might not succeed to reproduce the same quality! However, after I composed my previous sententiae for trumpet and piano (posted here two days ago), it seems my inspiration to compose for trumpet was stimulated, and so I composed my first soliloquy for trumpet which I post now, as well as a second soliloquy for trumpet (hopefully to be posted soon). I think/hope that nearly two decades later, I have succeeded to recapture something of the same high quality but with much less difficulty and more playability in this long-awaited sequel to my first trumpet piece!
  15. These are my "Three Sententiae for Trumpet and Piano, Op. 296". They are my first pieces ever written for the duo of trumpet and piano. I sent them to a professional trumpeter who had made a call for pieces for trumpet and piano, but I never heard from them! Obviously they didn't like it and in all rudeness couldn't even acknowledge receipt of the pieces! It's their loss and your gain! I post it here for your enjoyment and feedback which I will appreciate.