Mikebat321

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About Mikebat321

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    Starving Musician

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  1. Thanks for your input guys, very thought provoking. You know bouncy music did exist long time before BMB, for instance Sumer Is Icumen In, an ancient English polyphonic round from the mid-13th Century, which is extremely bouncy to say the least. I think Im inclined to say that BMB were perfectly capable of playing swing-time, or reggae, but didnt think to include it in their writing because they were so busy just doing their own thing. Thats the same for modern composers too. Rachmaninov, who Im sure was very aware of proper jazz and swing-time, again didn't actually write it because he was too busy doing his own thing. But I do like to think that BMB actually did play proper jazz and swing-time etc, but didnt incorperate it into their output because it just wasnt who they were, both as individuals or as part of their society. Beethoven of course officially started breaking into it right at the end of his life. Reflecting on the Socratic question 'is it better to be the best in one thing, or moderate in many things?' BMB were clearly examples of the former: they were who they were, did their own particular thing, and they took that ball and ran with it literally into orbit. But there were various lesser known composers who were more 'moderate in many things', such as the Baroque composer Baldassare Galuppi. Some of his harpsichord sonatas are literally like Chopin, incredible. Also just as a reflection, I think one must take into account the Jungian global collective consciousness, which I believe can be tapped into as an artist. I really dont think exposure to other cultures is the be-all-and-end-all of creating ground breaking or revolutionary ideas which dont appear at the onset to part of your own culture, quote unquote. Do you really need to be 'touched by African culture' just to put a bit of bounce in your right hand? Really?? don't think so. Surely putting a bit of bounce in your right hand is a natural human thing that all people have anywhere in the word, and at any time..
  2. What I cant quite get my head around is the fact for us today to play a really basic jazz funk rhythm is SO EASY, or a basic reggae is SO EASY, or a basic swing is SO EASY. So WHY WHY didnt it come just as easily into the minds of these god-like geniuses. I mean BMB created works a thousand times more complex than a basic jazz funk rhythm, so why did they never get this comparatively utter simplicity. That's what gets me.
  3. I love proposing this question to people- we have basicaly the same piano, the same format, same black and white keys (ish)- and its relatively simple for us to play a basic jazz funk. So the question is, Bach/Mozart/Beethoven (BMB) are generally accepted as god-like geniuses. So do you think they ever played jazz funk?? Even a really basic one. Do you think they were CAPABLE of playing it? But just thought it was stupid or rubbish, or socially unacceptable? And Im not talking about the boogie woogie in Beethovens last Cmajor sonata- Im talking a proper jazz funk rhythm on a proper jazz funk chord (eg, C in the bass, right hand playing Enatural Bb and Eb!). Or do you think BMB were absolutely not capable of such a thing- that they were NOT EVOLVED enough to even comprehend it, which of course begs the question- what are WE not evolved enough right now to comprehend what may be a musical norm sometime in the future. We need to ask The Doctor! Mike
  4. Hi guys just released Shifting Tones for piano, here's the 8min preview. Hope you enjoy Many thanks Mike
  5. Hi guys, here's a 16min preview of my new piano piece Shifting Tones II, gauranteed to relax you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvFYIDJ4uf4 If you fancy all 27mins head over to my site http://mikebat321.wixsite.com/michaelbates Lots of other free piano pieces there plus others for purchase. Hope you enjoy. Many thanks! Mike