Mcdovar

Muse Score Any Good?

23 posts in this topic

Hi!, I'm new to this site so I apologize if this is the wrong place to post

I had been looking for a free version of Sibelius or just a music notation program. After scouring the internet I found a program called Muse score http://musescore.org/.

It looks like a legit and cool program, but before I go downloading it I wanted to make see if any of you folks had used it before or had used a similiar program

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its junk.

No really, you get what you pay for.

Pony up and buy Sibelius if you're serious about composition. It will be the best decision you make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With 3,000,000 people having downloaded MuseScore, I imagine there must be quite a few of us doing interesting things with it. From newcomers to music software writing their first compositions, to hobbyists looking for a better, easier, and/or cheaper way to notate their music, to professional musicians, educators, and composers creating works for performance and even publication - I expect MuseScore is being used for all these things and more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With 3,000,000 people having downloaded MuseScore, I imagine there must be quite a few of us doing interesting things with it. From newcomers to music software writing their first compositions, to hobbyists looking for a better, easier, and/or cheaper way to notate their music, to professional musicians, educators, and composers creating works for performance and even publication - I expect MuseScore is being used for all these things and more.

'Sup MuseScore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Presonus's Notion 5 for my first choice score writing program,it's superb and much cheaper than Sibelius,plus it's very easy to use and you can use vsti's easily within it,I write my electronic music also with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a really old post, and Musescore has had quite a few upgrades since 2012.  It can turn out a nice score these days.  Sound files it comes with are still kind of cruddy, but you can always buy good quality sound libraries to use with it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would you pay for quality sound libraries for a free entry level notation program? Musescore is a toy. Sibelius and Finale are professional level tools. I wouldn't recommend paying for Sibelius if you aren't interested in professional level functionality, and I wouldn't recommend musescore if you are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on what "professional level functionality" you need.  When's the last time you looked at it U238?  It makes a perfectly serviceable score these days.  

 

If you care about the sound file, because the sound file is the product, for a video game soundtrack that's never going to be played live, for instance, I agree, it makes sense to get Finale or Sibelius.  

 

But if you want a good looking score for live performances and the sound file is just for demo purposes, MuseScore has all the tools you need.  I haven't bothered to learn all the formatting sub-menu options, but I still manage to make scores professional enough that my work gets played occasionally by people that I don't know.  No one has ever mentioned that the score put them off.  Shrug.  For live performance, the score just needs to be good enough that it doesn't distract and inhibit accurate sight reading.  (And there are plenty of old scores from actual publishing houses that DO distract from accurate reading that people still use anyway.  With tiny fonts to save paper that make them unreadable, awkward page turns, misprints, etc...  The bar isn't that high.)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on what "professional level functionality" you need.  When's the last time you looked at it U238?  It makes a perfectly serviceable score these days.  

 

If you care about the sound file, because the sound file is the product, for a video game soundtrack that's never going to be played live, for instance, I agree, it makes sense to get Finale or Sibelius.  

 

But if you want a good looking score for live performances and the sound file is just for demo purposes, MuseScore has all the tools you need.  I haven't bothered to learn all the formatting sub-menu options, but I still manage to make scores professional enough that my work gets played occasionally by people that I don't know.  No one has ever mentioned that the score put them off.  Shrug.  For live performance, the score just needs to be good enough that it doesn't distract and inhibit accurate sight reading.  (And there are plenty of old scores from actual publishing houses that DO distract from accurate reading that people still use anyway.  With tiny fonts to save paper that make them unreadable, awkward page turns, misprints, etc...  The bar isn't that high.)  

 

No. If you want a soundfile for a videogame you shouldn't be using a notation program at all. Sequencers and daw's are for that, and there is a comparable range of free, cheap, and expensive programs in that genre. Creating rough mockups that people can use to produce a performance is a different deal than trying to create a presentable publishable score.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since pretty much all variables are customizable in MuseScore's neverending list of menus and submenus, I'm going to venture out and say that you CAN make a professional-quality score on MuseScore, but it will take more manual tweaking to get it perfectly right than it would in a paid program. I am having a work performed by a full orchestra in April, and the score/parts were all made in MuseScore. It took a long time to get everything looking good, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MuseScore 2.0 is perfect for notation.
Forget it for composition / playback.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Protopopov said:

MuseScore 2.0 is perfect for notation.
Forget it for composition / playback.

 

If you're relying on a notation program for playback, you're doing it wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What? Nobody here has ever heard of sound-fonts? I mean the best are the ones you gotta pay for but there are countless sound-fonts that are free and yet sound fantastic IMO.  

Perhaps somebody might benefit from these links: https://musescore.org/en/node/103046

                                                                                https://musescore.org/en/node/33656

                                                                                

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/7/2016 at 4:18 PM, robinjessome said:

If you're relying on a notation program for playback, you're doing it wrong.

 

I'm relying on Finale for playback, and I'm doing it right. If you prefer DAWs, that's your preference. There is no right or wrong way to do such complex things as composing / notate music / generate audio, everyone has his own preferences. Working with a notation program and then using a DAW for the audio has been a pain for me so I opted for an all-in-one software.
 

On 15/7/2016 at 11:49 PM, RequiemLord said:

What? Nobody here has ever heard of sound-fonts? I mean the best are the ones you gotta pay for but there are countless sound-fonts that are free and yet sound fantastic IMO.

 

Soundfonts lacks important features compared to VSTs, but that's not what I was talking about anyway. I was referring to playback utilities like "Human playback" and others, that MuseScore doesn't have. Playback is the very last thing on their priority list, so if the original poster here was searching for a "free Sibelius", I just mentioned that MuseScore is very good for what concerns notation, and not good for playback.

Edited by Protopopov

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Protopopov said:

I'm relying on Finale for playback, and I'm doing it right. If you prefer DAWs, that's your preference. There is no right or wrong way to do such complex things as composing / notate music / generate audio, everyone has his own preferences. Working with a notation program and then using a DAW for the audio has been a pain for me so I opted for an all-in-one software.

Maybe I'm a bit of a purist in this respect, but I don't like relying on a computer to play my music for me. Regardless if it's a notation program, or a DAW, you shouldn't need the playback to tell you if it sounds good.... is all I'm saying.

Call me old fashioned, but if you can't write at an instrument, with a pencil and paper, you're doing it wrong ;)

Take this as Opinion and Generalization. Yes, I understand that there's music that can only be made in a program; I understand some people may not play an instrument. Regardless, I see the software as a polishing tool, to make a piece look and sound good, not as a part of the actual compositional process.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, robinjessome said:

Maybe I'm a bit of a purist in this respect, but I don't like relying on a computer to play my music for me. Regardless if it's a notation program, or a DAW, you shouldn't need the playback to tell you if it sounds good.... is all I'm saying.

Call me old fashioned, but if you can't write at an instrument, with a pencil and paper, you're doing it wrong ;)

Take this as Opinion and Generalization. Yes, I understand that there's music that can only be made in a program; I understand some people may not play an instrument. Regardless, I see the software as a polishing tool, to make a piece look and sound good, not as a part of the actual compositional process.

 

 

I have to say, I respectfully, but completely disagree with this.  If it weren't for quality notation software with playback, I would not be able to compose at all.  Some of us are not blessed with perfect pitch :(.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, bkho said:

I have to say, I respectfully, but completely disagree with this.  If it weren't for quality notation software with playback, I would not be able to compose at all.  Some of us are not blessed with perfect pitch :(.

 

No one said anything about perfect pitch ;)   I just mean do it yourself! The computer's a crutch, nothing more. 

Like I say, I'm old fashioned - write at an instrument, with a pencil. 

YES, I concede that you whippersnappers might consider "Finale" an instrument, and that there's a fine line between playing it on a MIDI keyboard, having the software notate it on for you, but I feel there's something more organic, personal, and natural about your music when it has to be filtered through YOU, as opposed to a computer.

Again, Sweeping Generalizations! 

<mumbles> Kids these days, Pokemon, iPads, instant gratifications, get off my lawn. </mumbles>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As anyone can tell from listening to my works, I'm kind of old-fashioned myself. And I did start my career by writing with pen and pencil (just not at an instrument, as per Robin's requirements, since I don't really play anything).

Yet I'm really thankful that I can use Finale now. It allows me to work much faster and better - not to mention that the scores are better looking as well. Yet, I still write note by note, not using any MIDI keyboard or else.

BOTTOM LINE: If a notation program works as a tool for a composer (as opposed to a substitute for a composer), then it's worth the pain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Austenite said:

As anyone can tell from listening to my works, I'm kind of old-fashioned myself. And I did start my career by writing with pen and pencil (just not at an instrument, as per Robin's requirements, since I don't really play anything).

Yet I'm really thankful that I can use Finale now. It allows me to work much faster and better - not to mention that the scores are better looking as well. Yet, I still write note by note, not using any MIDI keyboard or else.

BOTTOM LINE: If a notation program works as a tool for a composer (as opposed to a substitute for a composer), then it's worth the pain.

 

Yeah, I got to agree with Austenite here.  Finale does save me from a lot of trouble; just got to love it :)

About getting a free composition software, I've tried Musescore on a computer where I don't have my trusty Finale, and to be honest it is kind of tricky using the note input to add all the notes and then polish them.  The copy and paste feature is hard to get used to also, unlike in Finale which is quick to learn.  Still, if people on here say it can create a high-quality professional score with time and patience, then by all means try it.  I'll just finish with the opinion that if you want something that's convenient and worth your time, get Finale (that's from my experience; you can still get Sibelius if you want).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back on topic ;)

I actually use MuseScore exclusively now. The learning curve is steep, but very short. A few very weird quirks, especially being quite experienced with Finale, but in general the output looks good, is quick to input, and the price is right.

AND, for what it should be used for, the playback is perfectly fine. ;) 

===

Now that's taken me back off topic!  I've realized what I consider the playback in a notation program is to me... it's your Quality Assurance. It's your diagnosing and troubleshooting steps. It's there to help you identify and solve problems quickly - and I get that. It's great for that. 

Last word from me on the subject - I only take issue with it when it's your ONLY way of understanding what you're writing. If Finale is taken away from you, can you still write the same music? If yes, then by all means - use it as the speedy deployment tool it is. If NOT, then your ears are a key gap in your toolbox, and I think you have work to do. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now