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  1. Here my new classic rondo in ABACABA' form. A has more a melody and accopaniment texture, while B and C have more counterpoint texture with some rythm and interval interplay violin-cello. Hope you enjoy it. Any comments are more than wellcome.
    7 points
  2. Good evening everyone! I'm excited to present a new piece I have been working on for the last month or so: Scherzo for Orchestra. I deliberately wrote this fairly quickly, with the intent to write something fun, conventional, and maybe even a little whimsical. I'm interested in any and all constructive feedback. I had a few goals in mind as I composed this, feel free to critique my success or failure on these: Write something a little more informal and accessible, with catchy, memorable themes. Start with a very simple idea, and build the entire piece off of it. The four bar opening phrase in the 2nd violins popped into my head one day, so I tried to build the entire piece off of this motive and transformations of this motive. Practice having multiple contrapuntal lines. Some details on this are below. Write something that would work as a middle movement of a larger work, such as a symphony. Write something under 10 minutes, since I might decide to enter it into a competition and a lot of competitions have a 10 minute time limit. The piece is loosely structured in a three-part rondo form (ABACABA). (0:00 - 1:32) - A Theme - A very quick staccato theme in C# minor. I based this on the idea of a fugue, with each voice entering at different scale degrees, before they all come together to cadence. I'm sure I broke a few rules on the counterpoint, but it got the job done. The section ends on the V (G# minor) (1:32 - 2:21) - B Theme - A soaring theme in E major, then restated in Db major. Here I tried to have descending chromatic lines to complement the ascending melody. (2:21 - 3:04) - A Theme - Restatement of the second half of the A Theme, this time ending on I (C# minor) (3:04 - 6:31) - C Theme - A waltz in D major that begins very timid, gradually gains confidence, and goes out with a bang. (6:31 - 8:01) - A Theme - Restatement of the A Theme, this time in D minor, with the orchestration modified slightly. I threw in a couple unprepared modulations up a half step, to Eb minor and E minor. As a result I may have broken a "rule" here since I ended the section on B minor (which is not the V of D minor, the key I eventually return to). (8:01 - 8:49) - B Theme - Restatement of the B Theme, this time in Db major and Bb major. (8:49 - 9:37) - A Theme - The second half of the A Theme again, eventually returning to D minor to end the piece. As usual, I have an onslaught of questions I would like specific feedback on. Feel free to answer as many or as few as you wish: What effect does the music have on you? Does in conjure up an image? Or an emotional feeling? Does it tell you a story? This can be the piece as a whole, or a specific part or parts. What was your favorite part? What was your least favorite part? Do you have any comments or critiques on technique, e.g. harmony, melody writing, counterpoint, orchestration, voice-leading, etc.? How do you feel about the overall form? Is it effective? Do any of the parts seem impractical to you? It's a pretty fast piece with a lot of technique, so I'm curious if some of the parts are impractical. I don't mind them being difficult, I would only be concerned if they are borderline impossible. Do you have any comments of the quality of the performance in the audio file? I really want this to be a decent representation of how the piece would sound if it were performed live, since it is unlikely it ever will be. Feel free to put your "conductor hat" on and critique the "orchestra". I have included a score and welcome any constructive feedback on its presentation. And if you're like me it's a lot more fun to follow along with the score. Are there any composers this reminds you of, that I might enjoy listening to? Sound libraries: Spitfire Symphonic Orchestra and Spitfire Percussion VSL Trumpet (only for some of the lyrical trumpet melodies) VSL Violins (only to layer with the violins in Spitfire) Thanks for listening, I hope you enjoy! If you liked something I did and want me to explain how I did it, feel free to ask as well. -gmm
    7 points
  3. The Ballade in E-flat minor was written in 2021. Though it is written for solo piano, I had intended to write it for piano and orchestra, and may make a version of it for this ensemble in the future. The piece is about 8 minutes long. I hope you all enjoy it 🙂
    6 points
  4. A short violin tune. I tried to make it sound very-very dark this time.
    5 points
  5. Hello, Fuge a3 in c minor written for organ. North german style. Please tell me what you think.
    5 points
  6. Double fugue in gminor scored for 2x oboe, 2x bassoon in g minor. I think i will rearrange the fugue for two pianos... Written in the mid baroque style, so dont exptect those bach episodes 😉 Please telle me what you think. SimenN
    5 points
  7. I have written a quartet for strings on which I would like the honour of some of your criticisms. This work has sprouted from almost a year and a half of counterpoint study. It is similar to a fugue; that is, it does tend to have fugal aspects; however on the whole, this is mostly a work of counterpoint with many interesting hidden ideas embedded within it. I can understand if you are unable to listen to the entire work, as it is almost 16 minutes long; however, if you give me some feedback on even a single contrapuntal passage, I would be greatly indebted to you. Thank you for your time and I dearly hope you enjoy this work. On a side note, this recording that I have here does not take into consideration single note dynamics which is indeed frustrating; however, it is the only soundfont I could find that effectively does some of the counterpoint justice (that is, so it is not too muddy sounding).
    5 points
  8. METAMORPHOSIS YC Composer Competition - Autumn, 2020 I. Topic: All entrants must compose a unique piece that is based on the same melody. The fragment chosen by member vote is: Takashi Yoshimatsu, "Waltz of Rainbow Colored Roses" - https://youtu.be/3qihgGETXwc ***To be clear, entrants do not have to use the whole piece as the basis for their compositions, only the short fragment identified in the member voting post and now attached to this post. *** While a traditional "theme and variations" form is not required, judges will be looking for effective treatment and development of the chosen theme as a central aspect of each composition. The theme itself will be chosen by the judges from the nominated melodies submitted privately to the judges by entrants and members of the YC community at large. II. Eligibility: 1. You must be a member of the Young Composers forum in order to enter. Sign ups will be in the comments below for JUDGE or ENTRANT. Comment "I'd like to enter as ____" for entry. 2. There will again be no limits regarding instrumentation. There is no minimum length, but there is a maximum length of 15 minutes. 3. You must have some sort of audio rendition accompanying your work. 4. You must present a score of your music for judging. 5. If you volunteer to be a judge, you may not enter as a contest participant. III. Scoring: Due to a lack of sufficient judges signing up for this competition, scoring will be by member voting only. ALL ENTRANTS: PLEASE MESSAGE ME, @Noah Brode, WITH AN MP3 AND PDF SCORE OF YOUR SUBMISSION TO BE POSTED ANONYMOUSLY ON THE APPROPRIATE FORUM. ONCE ALL OF THE SUBMISSIONS ARE POSTED, YOU WILL HAVE ROUGHLY TWO WEEKS (SEE TIMELINE BELOW) TO PRIVATELY MESSAGE ME YOUR FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD-PLACE CHOICES FOR THE COMPETITION (OBVIOUSLY NOT INCLUDING YOUR OWN SUBMISSION). I WILL TALLY UP THE SCORES AND RELEASE THE RESULTS WITHIN A FEW DAYS OF THE FINAL DEADLINE (DEC. 27). THESE WILL BE THE ONLY SCORES OF THE COMPETITION; THE WINNER OF THE MEMBER VOTING PROCESS WILL BE THE WINNER OF THE COMPETITION. NOTICE THAT ALL OF THE DEADLINES HAVE BEEN PUSHED BACK BY ROUGHLY ONE WEEK. Member Voting: Once submissions have been entered, members will get three votes in which to vote on each other's pieces. These votes are tiered, meaning you will vote for your favorite entry, your second favorite entry, and your third favorite entry. The criteria or reasons for your vote need not be explained, though participants are highly encouraged to leave reviews on each other's works regardless. Members will send their first, second, and third choice picks to the judges after the submission deadline. Failure to do so will result in disqualification. Traditional Judging: 1. How well is the central process of the piece executed? How effective is the progression, or in the case of a lack of a linear one, how well is it represented? Most importantly, how internally consistent is the piece in the construction of a narrative? /15 2. How well is the piece orchestrated? Do instrumental orchestration (range, ability, etc.) and voice leading seem to be appropriate? How effective is the treatment of the ensemble? /15 3. How well integrated is the fragment to the composition as a whole? How central is the use of the fragment in the construction of the piece? /15 4. How clear is the score and audio of the submission? /5 5. A brief written segment (1-2 sentences) is required to explain the premise of the piece, if any. /0 Entrants whose primary language is not English are encouraged still to participate, as the diction and syntax themselves will not be judged. Timeline: Members will submit entries by first submitting their piece to the judges, both the score and the audio file. Each entry will then be posted by a judge or judges. SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR ENTRANTS: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 11:59 PST JUDGING DEADLINE FOR ENTRANTS: SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 11:59 PST Current Entrants: @Bradley Scarff @Left Unexplained @caters @PaperComposer @Joshua Ng @Hendrik Meniere @bkho @Aled Edwards @Ivan1791 (backup judge) @zhenkang @Leonardo C. Núñez @Thatguy v2.0 @luderart Current Judges: @Tónskáld
    5 points
  9. Hello, all! Here's my most recent composition. This is a more sonorous piano piece, less "dissonant" perhaps, though it's still based on the symmetrical scales of the prelude I posted recently. The title means "silver nocturne," and is intended to be liquid and smooth and placid, like rippling moonlight on a quiet lake. It will likely become incorporated as a "slow" movement into a larger work. The work features motivic, rather than thematic, development; you will notice the same motif weave in and out of the sections. Please let me know what you think of this. I'd love feedback of any kind! (This is a live recording so I do apologize for some of the choppiness in advance.) Happy listening!
    5 points
  10. I never ordinarily post non-original work - no cover versions, arrangements and on. This one is an arrangement of sorts so...bad.. It started when a student friend and I were looking through some of my recordings of old fashioned pop songs to build a folio in the hope of winning a few bookings at receptions and other events once lockdown is over. Most were "improvisations" although I'd choose the best takes, even cheating to learn a good improvisation. Several were quite flashy and flashy is not wanted at receptions where subtlety and background music is needed. Anyway, she suggested some pieces could be turned into easy studies that might help players wanting to be a bit more elaborate. Coming from the classical I'm a bit unorthodox this sort of music. As they were recorded on midi it seemed feasible. Except the worst was cleaning up the piano roll so it could convert to a meaningful manuscript. Anyway, here's one, a kind of fantasia on the tune (usually played very up-tempo, this one's quite slow and the mp3 won't tie up totally with the music. I don't know if the idea will work or has any mileage. If you're of a mind to comment on any aspect of the thing, thank you and it will be much appreciated.
    4 points
  11. Sinfonia in A minor "in profondità" Sinfonia "in profondita (into the deep)". Two movement sinfonia for baroque orchestra. Experimental fuge form. Fugal texutres broken up by chorale textures. Please tell me what you think
    4 points
  12. Hi everyone, I'm in the process of uploading as much of my music as I can on youtube, cuz what good does it do sitting around in my computer huh? Anyway, here's my second piano sonata as it was performed in 2016. It's divided into 3 movements and all three movements are following the typical sonata-form conventions to some degree or another. It took around 4 months to write the score and around 6 months in rehearsal time to get it performed to an acceptable degree. The third movement is specially challenging, but I think it sounds cool. Either way, have fun.
    4 points
  13. I added a trio to the minuet i composed recently. I found recording myself playing gave me performance anxiety and caused continuous mistakes. It was quite frustrating but I managed to get a somewhat decent recording with only a couple of minor mistakes. The minuet is Haydnesque but I experimented with the trio. I used doubled thirds to sound like a trumpet fanfare which is answered by the strings. A back and forth ensues which leads to a waltz like dance over a tonic pedal. I bought a book of minuet and trios recently by Haydn. In the first two minuet and trios of the book Haydn keeps the same key throughout the minuet and trio which i thought was unusual but uses tonicisations to add colour. I did the same and modulated briefly from F major to G minor in the B section of the trio rather than the relative minor to add more tension with the A section trumpet motif. I'm not 100% sure the trio works but I spent hours at the piano trying out many different approaches to create something new. In the score, one thing to note that bars 4 and 17 have two accidentals that are overlapping which obscures what they are, a B natural and an A flat.
    4 points
  14. I had a creativity outburst at the beginning of the pandemic, and wrote many pieces. In this it's a fanfare following a late-Romantic, slightly cinematic aesthetic, reminiscent of Korngold and Richard Strauss. When I posted this piece in another place, a player of the Sophia's Vereeniging symphonic band of the Netherlands asked me if they could play the piece, and I said that of course. There've been some rehearsals, but they had to be postponed after yet another spike in Coronavirus cases. The score can be seen here: https://albertdelaf.com/op13_en/
    4 points
  15. A blues-rock tune I composed inspired by classic bands like ZZTop as well as 70s/80s American car chase movies. Let me know what you think! A friend of mine from a local metal band recorded the electric guitar parts.
    4 points
  16. Hello! I decided to write a classical mini-little piano sonatina allegro movement! I didn't use any dice or try to make the music overly complicated or anything. I was going for just a pure easy-listening simplicity and ease of playing. It's not exactly sonata form as there's scarcely a development here. There are three themes though, which come back in the home key in the recapitulation. Let me know what you think and I hope you enjoy!
    4 points
  17. Good evening everyone, I had the good fortune of having my piano tuned for the first time in well over a year a couple of days ago. I'd almost forgotten how nice it could sound and feel! Anyways, given the wild hot/cold weather we've been having here it'll probably only last a week before keys start sticking and the action starts creaking again, so I thought I'd better take advantage of this little window of piano bliss. Here's a link to a collection of five piano character pieces. Written in late 2019, it's my most recent work, and actually the only thing I've written in the past four years or so. As one would expect from the title, these are melody-oriented and not formally complex. Hope you enjoy!
    4 points
  18. The Elegy in F minor was written in 2020. It is my second duet, since my Fantasy in G minor for violin and piano, Op. 4. The piece is about 14 minutes long, and contains 2 themes. This performance is a remote recording, and the cellist playing is JonathanCello from Fiverr, who recorded a few of my previous chamber works. https://www.fiverr.com/jonathancello/do-session-cellist-for-your-musical-project?context_referrer=user_page&ref_ctx_id=d3f44413-d69e-4a0f-8b73-8ace49eedd1c&pckg_id=1&pos=1 As always, I hope you all enjoy 🙂
    4 points
  19. Hi. So this is a cello sonata. I wrote this between 2017 and 2018 and it was premiered in 2019. The recording is not the super bestest ever, but it does the job. This is the 4th long-form "sonata" type thing I wrote and it was mostly based around the idea of augmented chords within a kind of neo-romantic style.
    4 points
  20. Thanks a lot for all your help comments and kind remarks. First I was hesitant about releasing the song but when I heard your comments, especially Papagenos about the melody (which I will never forget), I decided to have it recorded. What I realised here was that the oboe-melody that I actually wrote 2013 was so low in register that I could rather had written it for English horn, since it's much easier to keep the intonation in higher register. This wednesday we released it on YouTube. Enjoy:
    4 points
  21. Good evening everyone! I'm ready to present a new piece I have been working on for the last couple of months or so: Adagio for Orchestra. It’s a relatively short piece, not as large in scope as some of my other works I have posted here. Admittedly I’ve had a little bit of writer’s block recently, so I toned things back quite a bit and instead focused on simple themes and experimenting with an expanded orchestra, including Euphonium and Saxophone with the usual instruments. I'm interested in any and all constructive feedback. I had a few goals in mind as I composed this, feel free to chime in on how well I accomplished them: Focus on simple, memorable themes. Experiment with orchestration, using auxiliary instruments to create some unique textures. Integrate Euphonium and Saxophone with the rest of the orchestra. Write something that would work as a middle movement of a larger work, such as a symphony. The piece is loosely structured in a binary form with repeat (ABAB). (0:00 - 1:09) – Introduction. Euphonium solo that is passed between and elaborated by other members of the winds, punctuated by sweeping string lines. Most of the thematic material from the piece is extracted from this opening solo. (1:09 – 2:41) – A Theme. A melancholy dirge carried by a bell-like ostinato played by harp, celesta, and piano, with rustling tremolo in the strings and an eerie chant in the winds. (2:41 – 5:00) – B Theme. A floating theme first presented by the oboe then embellished by the strings to the first big outburst of the piece. Material from the A Theme is elaborated here, then the strings carry the oboe theme to a new momentary high, before settling back into the recap. (5:00 – 7:11) – A Theme recap. The dirge returns, this time building to a euphoric climax, then drifting away into the upper register of the woodwinds and strings. (7:11 – 8:13) – B Theme recap. This time the clarinet sings the theme. I experimented with some polytonality/polymodality/whatever-you-want-to-call-it with the chords in the horns, trumpets, flutes, keyboards, and harp. I’m curious how well I pulled this off. (8:13 – 8:38) – Coda. Return of the Euphonium solo, this time drifting off into silence to end the piece. As usual, I have few specific questions I would like specific feedback on. Feel free to answer as many or as few as you wish: What effect does the music have on you? Does in conjure up an image? Or an emotional feeling? Does it tell you a story? This can be the piece as a whole, or a specific part or parts. What was your favorite part? What was your least favorite part? Do you have any comments or critiques on technique, e.g. harmony, melody writing, counterpoint, orchestration, voice-leading, etc.? How do you feel about the overall form? Is it effective? How well do you think the euphonium and saxophone are integrated with the rest of the orchestra? How do you feel about the harmony in the B theme recap (the nondiatonic chords against the melody in the clarinet)? Is it effective? Do you have any comments of the quality of the performance in the audio file? I really want this to be a decent representation of how the piece would sound if it were performed live, since it is unlikely it ever will be. Feel free to put your "conductor hat" on and critique the "orchestra". I have included a score and welcome any constructive feedback on its presentation. And if you're like me it's a lot more fun to follow along with the score. Are there any composers this reminds you of, that I might enjoy listening to? Sound libraries: Spitfire Symphonic Orchestra and Spitfire Percussion VSL – Eb clarinet, Bass clarinet (in the intro only), Alto sax, Bassoon (for the solo only), Bb Trumpet (for the solos only, and some reinforcement in louder sections), Euphonium, Piano Thanks for listening, I hope you enjoy! If you liked something I did and want me to explain how I did it, feel free to ask as well. -gmm
    4 points
  22. Hi everyone! I've been thinking about writing some stuff for fantasy inspired settings (like WoW, Skyrim etc.). I've come up with these ideas and there were quite a few of them, and thus I decided to put them all together in one suite. Any feedback is appreciated!
    4 points
  23. Yeah, I'm gonna stir the pot as I always do in these sort of questions but it's just being honest The goal of a composition is the same of all art: To create something beautiful and great. Rivaling nature and worthy of a God. A secondary goal would be to musically embody some sort of thematic concept or environment. For example, if my goal is to write a sweeping, romantic desert piece, but it fails to convince the listener of this idea, then it has failed in this regard. It's only excusable to fail at the secondary goal provided your not writing to accompany a film or something, but never the first. Everyone who knows me knows that I not only don't accept, but am openly hostile to modernist conceptions of music, art and architecture which instead argue that the goal of these things is to "say something"; i.e., propagandize. Abstract conceptualism which uses political or philosophical "meaning" allegedly reflected by the piece as being more important than the piece itself and certainly more than the actual quality or aesthetics since those things are rejected as "oppressive" by modernists. Which leads me to... Because they're lying. What they were hoping for is that you would gush over their work, but instead pointed out flaws with it. Why do they lash out? Simple, and this is the most taboo subject in the world right now: They're totally brainwashed by the "equality" religion. They simply cannot accept that they are not as good as someone else in some regard. Everywhere you go, at least in the West today, everyone believes in "equality" in all things and people and that everyone is a blank-slate individual all equally-capable. People who have not been indoctrinated by this simply do not believe it. It is not an organic belief. Which is why no person who hasn't been indoctrinated by it genuinely believes that Kandinsky was good a painter as H.J. Draper. When someone gets mad at you pointing out that their melody is incoherent, doesn't work with their chord choices, and the lines are too stale because of lack of vibrato or whatever, the reason they are made is because you have claimed that their piece is inferior to others. That they are not "equal". and you know what? People who are superior, and know that they are, tend to be the most humble and helpful. Musicians and composers who were and are better than I, were only ever helpful to me but every guy making avant-garde noise music that sounded dated in '95 is SURE that I'm a d*ck who doesn't know what he's talking about when I say that music that sounds musical is indeed better than music that doesn't. I have never had a beautiful woman, or attractive people in general be rude to me — but every wicked witch of the west happened to also look like one...and insist they should be "models" too. I think you get the idea. It's the people who don't believe in equality that allow themselves to become the best can be at any given thing, because if you believe everything is equal by default, then you do not believe there is room for improvement...and improve they never shall.
    4 points
  24. Hello everyone, Once again, it has been a long time since I've posted anything here. Over the past year, I have been recording my chamber works using the remote recording technique (where the musicians involved record their parts separately), and have just finished recording my Piano Quartet no. 2 in G minor in this manner. I have already posted a live recording of the second movement here (https://www.youngcomposers.com/t38945/piano-quartet-no-2-op-10-mvt-2/), but the quality was not that great. Here, the quality is significantly better, and more importantly, the piece is complete! The Piano Quartet no. 2 in G minor, Op. 10 was written between 2019 and 2020, 3 years after the Piano Quartet no. 1 in B-flat major, Op. 3. It is my longest chamber work, lasting roughly 32 minutes, and has 3 movements. It was actually written concurrently with the Lacrimosa for piano quartet, Op. 11, hence the same orchestration. The whole piano quartet is based entirely on 2 distinct themes, which provide the melodic foundations of each movement. The 3 movements are as follows: Movement 1. - Andante misterioso - Moderato patetico (G minor) Movement 2. - Adagietto - Andante (C major) Movement 3. - Larghetto - Allegro grazioso (G minor-major) I would like to give a huge thanks to everyone who helped me bring this recording project to fruition. Their performances and services were phenomenal, and I could not have done this without them! The performers are as follows: - Javier Orman, violin (Mvts. 1, 2, and 3) https://www.javierorman.com/ - Dima Ratush, viola (Mvt. 2) - JonathanCello, cello/viola lines played on cello (Mvts. 1 and 3) https://www.fiverr.com/jonathancello/do-session-cellist-for-your-musical-project?utm_campaign=gigs_show&utm_medium=shared&utm_source=copy_link&utm_term=engey - Avigail Arad, cello (Mvt. 2) https://www.fiverr.com/avigailarad/teach-you-how-to-play-the-cello?context_referrer=user_page&ref_ctx_id=442e84e2-4238-452e-9737-c8c33da05bd5&pckg_id=1&pos=1 - Myself, piano (Mvts. 1, 2, and 3) Here are the recordings of all the movements: Here is the original video of the second movement: As always, I hope you all enjoy. 🙂
    4 points
  25. Fantasia i g minor. Fantasia for organ in the key of g minor. Multiple subjects and fugesubjects. Ps: The piece has not been editet yet, so there are som mistenkes. Both intentional and unintentional 🙂 Please tell me what you think SimenN
    4 points
  26. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XA6S1U5Wtc Hi! I'm Eunjae Oh, visiting this site for the first time. I am 19 years old and currently studying composition in university. To explain a little bit about the work, the theme of the work is a more splendid transformation of the first movement, and the melody of the second movement also appears in between. This is intended to strengthen the connection of each movement and finish the music well. Full version would be uploaded to the gsarci channel in the form of score+audio. I'd appreciate it if you liked it. Your feedback is always welcome.
    3 points
  27. Greetings. This is my very first post on the Young Composers community, and I would like to share one of my piano compositions that I had composed several weeks ago. This piano piece is a polonaise, which was written to imitate Frédéric Chopin's compositional style. Due to my busy schedule, I did not have the time to practice and record this piece. So instead, the audio file was exported from MuseScore 2.3.2. Any feedback would be appreciated, and I hope you will enjoy it! Carl Koh Wei Hao
    3 points
  28. Sheet music seemed ok to me given it's an example. You can trim the bars at the end when ready. Point is, composing melody is so personal a thing that it's difficult to give feedback. Always easier if they have a context/a background against which they're set. I found them rather choppy and angular but a) that's just me, b) in another form they might transform to something very lyrical. I mean, just changing #2 to a legato and perhaps altering rhythm and stress makes quite a difference in mood. 'Choppy' might be what you want (a sprightly ballet scene or something) in which case fine. It might still be worth looking at traditional melody writing (if you haven't already) just to broaden your repertoire. Traditionally you'd have, say, two balanced parts, the first ending on some sort of imperfect cadence, the second on a perfect one. Also worth learning a bit about modulation as melodies usually lead somewhere which might be to a new episode/melody in a different key. Likewise you might have a surprise modulation in a melody but need to know how to get back to the home key. These things take a bit of practice across time but they come in the end. Sorry if you already know this but in case others don't.... Usually, combining melodies counts as 'development' which often needs movement around different keys. (for those who want to explore this from scratch have a look at almost any Mozart Sonata first movement or Eine Kleine. There's a further point... writing for a melody instrument other than keyboard, the harmony is implied in the melody. You seem aware of this but it's worth experimenting with greater variety in a tune like this. For example, bar 3, shift the whole thing up a minor 3rd (to A flat) then back down in bar 4 to get back in the home key. Can you forgive me quoting your tune but changed thus, as an example? Must admit I've never thought about compositional goals. It's been about self-expression above and beyond the capabilities of words and, if I get the chance, make a little money out of it with some commercial fragments or at least a decent dinner and a few beers if working with someone else for nothing! (which has little to do with self-expression but what the 'client' wants!) Cheers.
    3 points
  29. Hey everyone! I'm inviting you to check my new piano solo "Wasted Tears"
    3 points
  30. These two piano pieces were created by me back in 2014. They are some of the first pieces that have a very simple harmony, yet sound quite natural and competent. Especially in the re-recorded version, which is presented in this video.
    3 points
  31. li uhl di-y I done gone made
    3 points
  32. hello everyone, I am back, this is my new piece in Japanese traditional style, hope you like it. instrument: koto & piano koto is a kind of picking string instrument the video: https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1rA411s71K/
    3 points
  33. The piece starts off with an introduction before breaking off into a fugue with a highly chromatic subject. This piece was an experimentation in contrapuntal writing, tension and rhythm. Any feedback would be highly appreciated!
    3 points
  34. Sometime, my teacher called something I wrote "abstract music" because it was not written with instrumental voices in mind, but rather as a compositional exercise(in counterpoint). Having no better term at hand, I tried to express that your composition is abstract from the guitar and its playing style(what I also called "unidiomatic"). I also partially listened to your Soliloquy No. 33 for Violin and felt like it was certainly playable on violin, but did not make use of its special techniques. I am no violinist, of course, so I am inclined to trust your experience as a cellist. Maybe a few notes may excuse my imprecise expression: - small melodic steps(jumps are perfectly playable as long as fingering is kept in mind) - mostly monophonic(the six strings permit proper accompaniment rather well) Combining just the two notes, it would be more idiomatic to begin the piece in a higher register(c' for example), so one could sprinkle in some bass notes to emphasize the harmony(A minor is strongly implied, I assume you had that in mind). Again, if you are not aiming for such a style of writing, I would not argue against that, but it certainly is the traditional style of writing for the guitar and something a performer would expect. Another thing I just stumbled upon, concerning your melodic writing: Between the third beat of m. 2 and the last beat of m. 3, you travel down a fifth almost in one jump and a ninth upwards in three consecutive jumps. Of course, melodies are to be judged by the ear, but such large (consecutive) jumps are traditionally discouraged because they are rather hard to sing(i. e. not naturally melodic) or, here at the very least, not used as as means of heightened expression. If I were to sketch the melodic outlines, this would certainly stand out visually while not giving a sense of a melodic peak. Additionally, your isorhythmic writing(all quarter notes in the first six bars) makes the melody rather tepid; I would try to incorporate a rhythm just as you do in ms. 9-11. Then again, Ms. 12 f. seem sparsely connected to those before. At the intersection of harmony and melody, your first six measures could also sound more compelling if the implied tonic was approached via its leading tone(just like in ms. 14 ff.). In essence, apart from what I told you in regards to how a guitarist would usually accompany himself to fill out the harmony, I would try to make the melody more interesting, especially rhythmically. Maybe you could also carve out a motif; I myself find the four consecutive notes in m. 7 rather memorable. After skimming three of your pieces, I sense you might benefit from coming back to something you wrote down and try to elaborate on it(melodically, rhythmically etc.). Hopefully, this does not sound harsh and you can make good use of advice.
    3 points
  35. This is something I think about a lot. If you aren't making physical copies of your music, I think you really should. Not just in burning CDs or whatever, but also in notation (and MIDI) so that the music can be re-created in the future if you lose the recordings. It has been noted in the 21st Century, that future generations will likely have no photographs of us, because no one develops physical photographs anymore. Facebook and Instagram are already no longer the monolithic media platforms they once were, as "alternative" platforms like Gab, Bit Chute, etc. are seeing record growth. In short: Facebook and Instagram will probably not be around in the future. But this is where, alongside SIM cards, where the bulk of the photos we take now are. What this means is that, in the future, your grandkids may not be able to find a single photo of you from your adult life. The SIM cards are long gone; the websites either offline or passwords to accounts long forgotten. The same is true of a great deal of music written over the last 40 years, at least. It's all digital. Many, many songs that people have written (especially over the last 15 years) exist entirely in cyberspace. It only exists as "backups" on HDDs which can and will eventually fail, on Box or Mediafire accounts that won't be around eternally, and no physical transcriptions of it exist. What this also means for us is that, you could be this really great musician and composer, but in 60 years? Your descendants may be completely unable to hear anything you ever made, over the course of your entire life. As if you never existed at all. Burn CDs, make cassettes, make sheet music, and many copies of it.
    3 points
  36. I've been working on this romantic orchestral piece over 9 months dedicated for my girlfriend. I wrote this piece on piano initially and then arranged it for orchestra. It’s in a basic sonata form with two melodies that interchange throughout the piece. If you have any feedback on the themes or the structure of the piece (or any other aspects) please let me know 🙂 It tells the story of falling in love, from humble beginnings to grand romantic gestures. It’s inspired by my own relationship, expressing everything I’ve felt so far in the form of music. Wishing everyone a safe and Merry Christmas at the end of this ridiculous year ❤️
    3 points
  37. This is a little Classical-style piano sonata I've just finished.
    3 points
  38. My favourite soundtrack is: But I like so much game music that listing it would take forever, lol.
    3 points
  39. Hello again, friends. I've been in sort of a composing funk for the past few months, lots of life stressors and, really, an utter lack of motivation to blame. I was hoping to write something on a grander scale but I had to settle for solo piano once again. You know what they say: beggars can't be choosers. This is the opening prelude to what will likely become another suite for piano. It's written in harmonic language derived from non-heptatonic scales (my favorite, as some of you know by now), and, as such, may sound unpleasantly dissonant. The chords are quartal or quintal rather than triadic, and there's no sense of a home key. It can't quite be classifed as atonal, however, because the note pitches do play a functional role; it is probably best described as modal, which presents a listening experience unusual to ears familiar with tonal harmony. Nevertheless, I hope you find it enjoyable, or at least appreciable. Feedback and comments are always welcome (so are any questions you may have)! Please, enjoy!
    3 points
  40. I would like to enter as an entrant
    3 points
  41. I decided to make a calm and cozy melody because that's fun! 😄 Critique is very welcome!
    3 points
  42. Hello everyone! This is a courante in C major for solo cello. it is supposed to go together with the allemande I composed last month since I am trying to composer a whole suite. It is in [:A:][:B:] binary form and 3/4 time. The first part is 16 measures long and modulates from the tonic, Cmaj, to the dominant Gmaj. Part B is 18 measures long and modulates once: Cmaj --> Dm --> Cmaj. Any feedback, suggestion or comment is appreciated! Hope you enjoy it and thanks for listening!
    3 points
  43. It makes a lot of sense if you think about it. In classical days, singers read off single sheet voice parts. The tenors just had the tenor part, no indication of what anyone else was doing, the basses just had the bass part, and likely all the basses were looking over each other's shoulders at a single copy by the light of one flickering candle... Think of how difficult it is to sight read if all you have is your part, without being able to relate it to the rest of what's going on. If you play the violin, you put your finger in the right place on the right string and you reliably get a certain note, but if you are a singer, you have to pluck your note out of thin air. It's really hard to do accurately without being able to see the complete structure of the harmony you are a part of unless you happen to have perfect pitch, which is a rare gift. Modern sheet music always gives singers all the choral parts together plus a reduction of any instrumental parts. We're in the age of modern printing. It's cheap and easy to do. Classical period's solution to save time laboriously copying notes onto handwritten sheets was to have the brass double the singers so they couldn't get lost, and to strictly enforce voice leading rules so that parts tended to move by predictable stepwise motion as much as possible, rather than by leaps, which people are more likely to misjudge. It was sheer self-preservation on the point of composers. The alternative was a train wreck every time you premiered a new piece. It's not like singers could go out and listen to a recording of the thing before they tried to sing it either.
    3 points
  44. Indeed, Luis! "Brass... also reproduce choral writing better than woodwind; in much early music, brass, especially trombones, simply double the voices."
    3 points
  45. You shouldn't give up on music composition. Why would you if it's who you are? Are you giving up on yourself? Who cares how much knowledge someone else has, there will always be someone who knows more than you about music. That in no way should deter you from really living if you have found who you are as a person. When I made the decision for music to be my career, my dad was pretty disappointed. He didn't talk to me for a while, and when he finally did, he only told me that artists will suffer. I knew he was right, and I knew he said that because I excelled in school and could have chosen an easier path to success. But I knew who I was, and only you really know that. Of course it absolutely helps to have a leg up with tutors. I teach private guitar/piano lessons for a living (I would be performing for supplemental income, but well, you know, Covid in the U.S..................), and sometimes I'm just amazed at what they're learning at early ages. But a lot of them are ungrateful rich kids, and don't have the passion you have. And honestly, I think the passion for composition is the only fuel you could have to move forward, no matter where you're at with your music education. Go for something unique in your writing. Be you. Sure you could post another pastiche form that composers 200 years ago did way better than you might ever do, you could adhere to a common practice harmony and study Bach all your life. You might attain a position at a university, teaching the same shiit that a million others do when you could just buy an 18th century counterpoint book. Sure, learn from that, but keep going forward. The evolution of music stems from hearing what the world around you has done and is doing, and putting the Keaton Hoy spin on it. The thing is, you'll never know it all, and neither will the ones who had an advantage over you with earlier lessons. You've completed AP theory, I'd say that's a one up over some people who are applying against you. I'd focus on finding your musical voice, absorbing all you've learned and molding it into what you want to give this world. Keep in mind, we live in the information age. It's 2020, dude. I don't know what kind of music you write, but cater it towards the age in which you live and I guarantee with perseverance and lots and lots and LOTS of HARD WORK, you will find success as a composer. No one is going to copy your work. And plus, when you post a written or audio form of your music online, it is automatically a copyright. I'd say post your music for peer review if you're trying to put together a portfolio. There are tons of wonderful people here that give great reviews and constructive insight to members works FOR FREE. Take advantage of that! It's truly a humble community, and being here off and on for years has helped keep my inspiration alive. Oh, and welcome! 😄
    3 points
  46. Possibly, but I was thinking it could be a bit more open-ended than a strict theme-and-variations piece (which we did as a competition theme a few years ago, except in that one, everyone chose their own theme). Like composers could feel free to add themes of their own to the music, and use the provided melody / fragment as a starting point. @Ivan1791 also mentioned a competition based on the seasons. I can add that topic to the list, if there are no objections. I'm also with you on the question of the ensemble. I don't think it is a great idea in general to put specific restrictions on instrumentation for YC competitions. Some composers might feel more comfortable writing for solo piano or chamber ensemble than they would for a full orchestra, and for others, the opposite might be true. I think we could attract more entrants if we keep the instrumentation open-ended.
    3 points
  47. I like this idea of a more "absolute" music theme. Maybe restrict the overall form of the piece (sonata, rondo, etc.). Another idea is to have an orchestration challenge. Start with a piano reduction or something that's in only a few staves, and have the competition be to expand to a larger ensemble. The instrumentation could be either defined, or up to the contestants.
    3 points
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