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MuseScience

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MuseScience last won the day on January 27 2016

MuseScience had the most liked content!

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About MuseScience

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 09/14/1995

Contact Methods

  • Skype
    nicolaus.mourer

Profile Information

  • Biography
    I began learning music in the 7th grade when I joined my school's band class. Since then, I've expanded out and sought to explore music on my own, having learned piano, violin, and trumpet through my own desires. I learned the saxophone for band, and played percussion my junior year to fill a missing spot in the marching band's drumline. I've been composing since I could read music, and I've been getting better at it since. I fell in love with the works of Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and Handel. Although, Mozart is my favorite composer, and I have spent endless hours studying his music and commanding myself to better myself and my music. I am forever ambitious for music, for it is my love, passion, and life's desire. I intend on going into music, so I am majoring in piano performance as an undergraduates degree; I will be seeking my graduates in composition (masters) and conducting (doctorates). I intend on both performing and conducting my own works when the time comes. I would try to get into the music industry and compose for games and films, but seeing as how that is rather difficult to accomplish, I will always seek to perform classical, chamber works of my hand.
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Texas
  • Occupation
    Full-time Student
  • Interests
    Music; piano performance and composition. Politics, and science.
  • Favorite Composers
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig Beethoven, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Joseph Haydn, and Muzio Clementi.
  • My Compositional Styles
    Classical, Neo-classical, early-romantic, Baroque, and Modern Concert Works.
  • Notation Software/Sequencers
    Finale 2014, Pro Tools 11, EastWest Quantum Leap
  • Instruments Played
    Piano, Violin, Saxophone, Trumpet, Marching Percussion, and classical vocalist.

Recent Profile Visitors

7,225 profile views
  1. Juilliard's not going to work out guys. But that's okay! I gave it a shot and now I know. So, I feel it's time for me to delve in and start understanding my strengths and weaknesses as a whole and work on those accordingly. Thanks for the support you guys gave me by the way, it really means a lot to me even though Juilliard isn't going to happen! :)

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. KJthesleepdeprived

      KJthesleepdeprived

      Well Juilliard or not, you're super talented and I'm sure you're gonna do really well wherever you go!

    3. Ken320

      Ken320

      Did they give you any specifics that you would care to share?

    4. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      No, they didn't really tell me anything lol

  2. Vivaldi and Adams were the only two I voted overrated. Adams probably not as much, but for me personally, Vivaldi's music just blurs together too much for him to be pleasurable to me. It just sounds like cliché italian baroque music to me and that gets old after a while. I definitely think that Charles-Valentin Alkan is one of the most underrated composers I've ever come across though. I can't express how underrated I feel he is. Same with Schnittke.
  3. Buy books on this subject. Books are always great ways to solve all your musical problems. Trust me. Look about on Amazon, Google Books, or maybe even your local public library. If you are serious about wanting to get better, you can find great information from all sorts of sources, but books are money for the musician looking to advance his/her skill level. While you will get access to tons of useful and applicable information in those books, its up to you to put in the elbow grease to making your projects sound as good as possible. I suggest looking up books on mixing/mastering tracks, and even books on electronic music since thats what your music seems to drift more towards sounding like. Good luck!
  4. I would accept without much consideration, simply for the reasons people mentioned above. The only thing that might worry me is the fact that, due to the circumstances of having new music every week, you'd either have to create smaller-scale pieces that are pretty good, or larger-scale pieces that are unrefined and unworked. I'm guessing the composer in this hypothetical would have to go with the smaller-scale pieces. This being a downside, the composer could never actually compose larger, better works without having to be able to compose smaller works to satisfy the weekly requirements. Thus, it would be frustrating to any composer looking to broaden their compositional repertoire. But for only three years, it'd be so worth it. Also, the weekly constraint might be pretty difficult to a contemporary composer because harmonies today are so much more complex than harmonies from the 18th century, especially when Haydn was under the patronage of Esterhazy. I'm sure any composer worth their salt could manage to work within the time-constraints though.
  5. Wow, that's actually a rather fantastic analogy. I suppose ultimately we decide and carve our musical language throughout our lifetimes, varying with what we listen to, study, or compose during a certain "phase" or "era". It's probably just human nature to personally move on and explore new horizons with your abilities and to break the barriers that you had set for yourself previously. However, with all of that, our purpose with music and why we do it may or may not change, yet our voice will not. Huh. :P
  6. So, a question. Do you, as an experienced and successful composer, believe that the voice that one develops and has through their compositional flavor stays the same throughout their entire compositional career/life, do you believe it changes subtly, or do you believe that it can change drastically over time? And do you believe that the composer himself chooses to change it or do you think it's more or less a natural progression? I figure that seems like a redundant question, but what I'm getting at is something like this. For example, Penderecki for the first half of his compositional career was known as an avant gardist, then later switched to a way more conservative style. Does that result in a complete changeover in his musical "voice" or does the voice stay the same, but the style simply changes? Are the two independent of each other, or not at all, in your opinion?
  7. You can't simply want it and hope it will happen and you can't put such standards for yourself for when you write your first symphony. It may not sound good at all, however you mustn't let that stop you from trying and trying again. Beethoven and Mozart both wrote tons of pieces, both good and horrible, before any of their first masterpieces were even thought of as simple musical ideas prior to their making. They spent years, even decades learning and mastering their craft before writing those pieces. I'm saying that you can't hope to understand music and write down an entire symphony in one huge step. It takes time - years even, before a person has enough compositional experience and knowledge to write even a decent sounding symphony. If I were you, I wouldn't start with a symphony. I would start with mastering the basics like melodies, harmony and counterpoint. Once you have mastered those and laid your musical foundation, only then can you go on and build the fountain of ability you so desire. Remember that Rome wasn't built in a day, and neither is musical ability. Learn to crawl on your hands and knees, then walk, then run, then jump. It's all a process and you can't skip any one of those steps no matter how much you want to. We all have to go through it, friend. Good luck friend!
  8. Probably going to apply to Curtis too, just for the sake of trying. Besides, its tuition free and I'd like to not be 100k in debt when I graduate.

    1. Show previous comments  1 more
    2. orchdork02

      orchdork02

      I'm auditioning for viola performance though so no competition or anything lol

    3. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      Good luck my friend! Maybe we'll see each other there! (Maybe not too :( )

    4. pateceramics

      pateceramics

      Mandatory dorms for freshmen are actually great. Starting out in an apartment as a freshman can be pretty isolating. No one who has just met you wants to come all the way out to your place and hang out. With dorms, you all just get to know each other brushing your teeth.

  9. Would anybody want to see my work(s) in progress for Juilliard audition? Or should I just wait till they're finished?

    1. Show previous comments  2 more
    2. Austenite

      Austenite

      Better to catch any potential modification when the house is still being built.

    3. luderart

      luderart

      Austenite's metaphor seems sound. But I still think it would rather be like inviting people to have a debate inside your mind!

    4. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      Alright guys. My first piece is up!

  10. So, I've decided to apply to Juilliard as a transfer for composition. I think I may have a shot. Keep your fingers crossed for me guys! :D Also, I'll post my audition pieces when I figure out which ones I've finally decided to use.

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. KJthesleepdeprived
    3. Ken320

      Ken320

      Fantastic! You will love New York. Tell me, have they told you which credits they will accept? People tell me that they were denied previous credits because "we want you to learn the Julliard way." Please report back.

    4. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      @orchdork02 Hi! I picked Juilliard because I would very much love to study with John Corigiliano, who is a very renown composer that is on staff there.

      @Ken320, I'm not quite sure what credits they will accept, although I'm sure they would accept my music credits as I would be a transfer from another conservatory. Although, my focus at this point is to just get accepted. I would worry about all of the other details later! :D

      Thanks guys for the wishes!

  11. How difficult do you think it is to get accepted to Curtis Institute of Music for composition? Should I go for it or leave it be?

    1. Show previous comments  4 more
    2. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      wasn't getting what I wanted and so to this day she is still vindictive and resentful. Despite the fact that I left on good terms. I was just thinking out loud because she has been making my friend's life hell lately. Ugh. Anyway, sorry for the long story lol

    3. KJthesleepdeprived

      KJthesleepdeprived

      Eh... it was only tow comments worth so not long at all :P

      But yeah I am always slightly discouraged by the fact that applying to places like that costs so much. Anyway don't do things out of spite!

    4. pateceramics

      pateceramics

      I don't know… if you're feeling spiteful anyway, it's the least you can do to turn it to productive purpose. "I'll show you!" can be a great motivator of hard work.

  12. Has anyone heard Dvorak's Piano Concerto? My, I've honestly not sat down and listened to Dvorak ever. I'm astounded. Any other pieces by him that should be a recommended listen?

    1. bkho

      bkho

      Dvorak is one of my favorite composers. I think his piano concerto is an criminally underrated masterpiece. It is criticized for not being virtuosic and for supposedly non-idiomatic writing in the piano part (some critic snidely referred to it 'as if written for two right hands') but I think it has some of his most beautiful melodic writing.

      Definitely check out his violin concerto (more highly regarded but still unfairly considered in the second tier behind the great war...

    2. bkho

      bkho

      I think my last post got cut off.

      In a nutshell, also check out his violin concerto, cello concerto, symphonies #7 and 9, slavonic dances and his Czech Suite and Romance for violin in F minor.

    3. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      Thanks Bkho! You were right. Fantastic listens, man. :)

  13. So I came into some money. About $2500. I really want to buy a good VsT. I have EW Symphonic Orchestra Platinum currently but I really want to buy something that will allow me to do bigger, better sounding (even realistic) scores. If its feasible that is. Any suggestions?

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. p7rv

      p7rv

      By the way, what did you end up using my sonata for?

    3. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      Oh, I didn't use it for anything. I just wanted to provide you a recording of it. :)

    4. MuseScience

      MuseScience

      I wouldn't use it for anything without your permission, anyway.

  14. Well it's probably best to just get used to transposing for different instruments because it's quicker and more effective. If you don't, it'll cause problems when instrumentalists go to play it because it won't be in the correct key in regard to playing with other instruments. So, unless you're writing for all instruments in concert key, you might as well spend the time learning how to transpose in your mind. Like anything else with music, it'll pay off in the end. :)
  15. Boy, really having a hard time at the University I'm currently at with the music program... Let me ask you guys a question. If you were forced to take a rudimentary level music theory class because you weren't allowed to test out of it, would you pull your hair out or not care? I'm basically going through that again. I made the highest out of all the freshman on the placement exam, yet they wouldn't let me into the more advanced levels, even though I know the material. Hell, I...

    1. Show previous comments  7 more
    2. pateceramics

      pateceramics

      I don't know, from the school's point of view they need to be able to justify themselves to grad schools for your benefit, in a neat synopsis, and to prospective students. It makes sense for them to have a common set of requirements.

    3. pateceramics

      pateceramics

      Not everyone comes in with the same skills, but they can GUARANTEE to anyone who asks that you'll come out with a certain set. If they start making exceptions, everyone wants an exception. Including people who really shouldn't get one. They'd waste all their time arguing with students.

    4. pateceramics

      pateceramics

      But all they are saying is that you have to do at least this. If you do this PLUS some extra stuff this semester, you can show that you really know your stuff, and be top of the heap for grad school applications.

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