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Sahil Sidhu

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About Sahil Sidhu

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Australia
  • Interests
    Music composition, film-making, art, 3D modelling, piano playing, music analysis, language, writing
  • Favorite Composers
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Frederic Chopin, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Franz Liszt, Pyotr Illich Tchaikovsky, Johannes Brahms, Gustav Mahler
  • My Compositional Styles
    Classical, Romantic
  • Notation Software/Sequencers
    Musescore
  • Instruments Played
    Piano

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  1. Thank you very much for taking the time to review it! Honestly, I believe you are definitely correct. I do tend to play more Chopin on my piano than any other composer, (ballades, nocturnes, etudes etc.) But, I think that since I play him so much, his style is starting to seep into me. Now I am learning Rachmaninoff's Concerto no. 2 and 3, and also composing a piano concerto of my own, (you can see where this is going!) But, I honestly am just trying to follow this one quote I heard somewhere: If you rip off an artist, people will just say you are the next *artist's name*. But, if you rip off a hundred artists, people will comment that you are so original. I guess that right there is the secret to originality! Thanks anyways and good day!
  2. A set of two nocturnes! I am going to write a few nocturnes in minor keys as well, so don't worry if these are too happy for you. My dark and brooding side is yet to come in the form of a symphony! Enjoy this for now! (You can see how I was originally going to start the B-flat major prelude in D minor!) Please give all the criticism you can.
  3. What a pity. Thanks for listening to it, though! I am very glad that you enjoyed it! Thank you very much!
  4. Well, thanks for taking the time to review it! I must say, I am very disappointed with my choice of tempo. Like you said, some of the slower ones sound fast with unnatural energy, and the ones that are fast sound slow with wasted drive and energy. It almost sounds as if it is capable of more. As for the resemblance to various composers. Well! I was trying to sound original, hahaha. Thanks for your time anyway!
  5. I see what you mean. Well, I guess you can argue your point by virtue of the subjective nature of music. Obviously, my comments were just what I heard or what I saw that jarred with my notion and understanding of a sonata by Mozart or Haydn, or even Beethoven. I see what you mean, yes. I was just telling you because, from what I saw, it did not look like you intentionally did it. I am a pianist as well and I know there are many more difficult passages, *cough* Rachmaninoff concerto 3 3rd mvmt *cough*. In the first ten bars of your second movement, is there really anything that the mind can hold on to? Your movement is quite short (excluding repeats), therefore I would expect a shorter motive that reappears in the piece. It you want a longer more expansive melody (more Romantic really, however, not uncommon in Classical), make a longer movement to properly develop thematic material. In Mozart's K.545 Andante, you can see that after 8 bars (even phrasing), the theme repeats with variation. Hence, we have something we can remember. Also in that he ends each two bar phrase with the same thing: the dotted quaver and a semiquaver. All I'm saying is that, since you overtly borrowed the theme from Beethoven's 9th Symphony, I don't see why you manipulated it here (especially since this piece focuses on Mozart). Anyways, thanks. Sounds like you really know your theory. You are just missing the human aspect of the piece. Would you mind doing a review on my preludes?
  6. It is a good attempt to honour Mozart on his birthday. The Alberti bass has a resemblance of Mozart's music. However, I feel that the piece is not very pianistic, if you know what I mean. It doesn't sound like it was supposed to be written for the piano. More careful use of texture and harmonic rhythm would have also ensured a better musical direction and experience overall. A few things you can look at: I have to talk about your choice of phrasing. The piece you are writing is clearly in the style of classical music and Mozart. However, in your opening, you have a seven bar phrase. That is very irregular and is more of a romantic characteristic. In Mozart's K.545 sonata, you can see an opening of four bars followed by scales (which I assume is the inspiration for the scale passage following that opening). The dramatic change in position of the Alberti bass from b.1 to b.2 and in the second beat of b.3 to the third beat of b.4 is very queer sounding and awkward to play. Also, the change in speed of the Alberti bass from b.2 and b.3 is quite abrupt, and does not serve its purpose. B.18 and b.19, parallel chords are ineffective. B.36, I see some experimentation with shifting music cells. However, I find that ineffective in this context, especially in a classical Mozart style piece. Alberti bass in the right hand? Really subverting the genre there. However, that is good news if you want to be original and not write in the style of someone else. In your second movement, overall the melody seems to be going nowhere and at times I feel no sense of emotional direction. I do admire your strict sense of form, though. Each section has its own unique texture, however, it is united as a movement through the same way of concluding. In the third movement, I can see you used the K.550 motive after you mentioned it. However, you manipulated it until it was unrecognisable, which is great for originality. However, I don't think that was your intention. It is very good. Just change these and you will have something Mozart would be proud of! Just my humble opinion!
  7. These are a set of five preludes for the piano that I wrote, so they are relatively short. Keep in mind, this is the musescore render of it, so it's missing a lot of expression and musicality. Looking for feedback on them. Thank you!
  8. Thank you for the feedback. I have no idea why I always, without a doubt, give the music an extremely fast speed.It has always been daunting to start the second movements of these pieces as I have no idea how to approach a slow, more relaxed piece. Perhaps you could give me some tips on how to approach such a type of music. There are many mistakes in my music, as I have never gone for composition tuition or anything which is similar, all you hear in my music is what I have been teaching myself. I did this by listening to classical pieces I considered "nice" and try to hear for things that make it stand out. And then when I have an idea that sounds good, I write a piece. Thanks, as always, for your opinion!
  9. The work is finished, at least the first movement is. I remember I was writing this piece in my head that day reflecting back on my mood. My computer's sound is spoilt so I can't hear the music I make, only once I'm finished and I send it to my other devices for playback. So far this piece has had only one revision. I probably should slow it down, because it seems I have no hope of playing it. Thanks for the feedback!
  10. Aww shucks I forgot to remove them! I added extra just in case and forgot to remove them. Forgive me, I will edit it.
  11. Hmm, I see your point. Because I personally prefer fast moving music, I made this to be fast. But I understand not many people like it. But it is hard to write something you don't really like yourself. Thanks for your opinions!
  12. My first piano sonata guys! Have a good day and please give feedback! :)
  13. A new symphony friends. Enjoy and please give feedback as I want to make my works better! Have a good day. :)
  14. I know, it doesn't belong here. I am kind of new to this website and do not know how to delete the post so I will just leave it. Any feedback on the music will be helpful.
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