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Found 83 results

  1. Mikebat321

    Emotude

    Hey guys, just a short snippet of what Im working on atm, Emotude for piano and cello. It's still rough around the edges, but Its gonna be epic, about 30mins long. Wish me luck! Mike
  2. Hey everyone! It's been a very long time! I first joined here around a decade ago, and never stopped composing! I've since moved to Sweden from the US, and am studying composition at a conservatory here. I wanted to share my first big project from last term, where we were to compose for a chamber ensemble of fantastic musicians (Norrbottens NEO, in case you're interested). As first years, we weren't on their actual recital and were encouraged to write music as difficult as we wanted and try new things. Unfortunately, their percussionist was ill on the day of the rehearsal/recording, and we only had about an hour each to rehears and record, so it didn't turn out as great as I had hoped. It was still an awesome learning experience, and given a few more hours of rehearsal I'm sure it would have turned out great. In lieu of that, I'll attach both the midi and the recording, as well as the score. The ensemble is for flute, clarinet, violin, viola, cello, piano, and percussion. Instead of writing one piece, I decided to write four short movements, each one exploring a different idea. The first two are played as one, and explores some cool scales (double harmonic major as well as a fully diminished locrian), the third movement deals with time signatures/rhythm (and, seeing how the percussionist that was there that day was sight reading, I think he did fantastic), and the fourth movement was to see how much I could have acoustic instruments sound like synthesizers in a dubstep-like movement. Obviously it's a finished piece, but any and all feedback would be welcome! I hope to be posting here more and getting to know the new people as well as catching up with the old ones :D
  3. A piece I wrote one day during the summer holidays. https://youtu.be/IPhrPxi4l8Q
  4. Hi everyone, Here's a short piece for piano trio I wrote over the summer. Let me know what you think and things I should keep in mind for future pieces. A clearer PDF score is attached below. Thanks! J Shu
  5. Hello! [Partly the description in the program booklet and youtube video] Maarten Bauer – Melodrama No.1 ''The End of His Story Started Here,'' Op. 45. 11th of August 2017 Dedicated to all the victims in concentration camps during World War II. The music begins at circa 2:00 On the 18th of November 2017 (one of the) most prestigious composition competition(s) in the Benelux took place: Prinses Christina Compositie Concours. I submitted my Melodrama No.1 ‘’The End of His Story Started Here’’ and to my surprise I won the first price of competition! I cannot express my gratitude for the judges, the performers (Trio Burlesco+) and the audience! Furthermore I would like to thank the other participating composers for the amazing experience and relaxed atmosphere during the stressful day. Description This melodrama uses the poem, which I have written in 2014 (see the text below), based on John Boyne’s astonishing book The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. This composition is composed for the Trio Burlesco and a soprano and a percussionist (Trio Burlesco+). The text and music strengthen each other, so none of the two can be omitted. The innocent soprano is both narrator and singer and she symbolizes the actions, the emotions and the thoughts of the main character in the poem: Shmuel. Shmuel is a Jewish boy, who has just arrived in Auschwitz, which is called Out-With by Boyne. He does not know where he is and he cannot find his family, consisting of his father, mother and his big sister, whom I called Anat, which means ‘singing.’ The motivation for me to write such a heavily-weighted piece, namely an innocent young boy who will probably die in a Nazi concentration camp, is because I noticed that people in my surrounding realize less and less that freedom and peace are not obvious. It is the greatest gift that we can live in freedom and peace in the Netherlands. I noticed that this important consciousness gradually drains away by the years. Therefore I wanted to compose a piece, which remembers us that we have to be grateful for the lives we now live and that the indescribable terrible crimes may never be repeated. When I wrote the poem, my tears flowed. When I composed the Melodrama, my tears flowed. And now again, my tears flow, because this may never happen again. Never. https://christinaconcours.nl/alles/9667/
  6. Hi everyone! I wrote this piece, "Penumbra", at the request of a teacher, and I liked how it came out. The inspiration musically was based around progressive rock and jazz fusion structures and harmony. I have only a little experience with clarinet and cello, so I'm not sure whether all of the fingerings are ideal. I'd be very grateful if any players of those instruments could give me feedback on that. Penumbra.pdf Penumbra.mp3
  7. This is my first post on this forum, I am looking to get some feedback on a piece I have been working on recently. The chord progressions are of constant structure, non-diatonic major chords, switching to non-diatonic minor chords for the second section. Be warned, I am a big fan of dissonance; if it's too much for you please don't hesitate to include that, I sometimes go a little over the top after listening to the same thing over and over, and I don't realize until later. euphoralgia.mp3
  8. This is my Soliloquy for Violoncello No. 13. It was inspired by my getting back my cello after a long time. I practiced it, hoping to be able to adequately perform it and be able to post my performance of it instead of the computer-generated MP3. However, having not touched the cello for many years, I still need much more practice to give it a smooth performance, let alone a good interpretation of the piece, and hence do justice to the piece in performance. Maybe, I'll do so in the future. In the meantime, any cellist who is interested in the piece would be welcome to take up the challenge, perform the piece, and post their performance! Reviews are also welcome.
  9. Hi Guys! This is my first post. I would love to hear your opinions on my take on: The Rains of Castamere, the most epic song from Game of Thrones.
  10. Not sure if it fits in the topic, but here is a vocal cover with orchestration of The Rains of Castamere from the Game of Thrones series. Hope you like it and Id like to hear your thoughts!
  11. This is my latest cinematic orchestral piece "Gone". I would appreciate your feedback and suggestions. Click the YouTube link below: "Gone" by Karisa L. Clark
  12. hello, This is my new string quartet composition. Just listen, and share your opinion! Thanks! :)
  13. Morning, Not posted here before, but seems like the sort of place I might get useful feedback. I've been composing in a few different styles for quite a while, but this seems to be the most genuine sort of sound for me at the moment. I'm not sure I can justly call it 'chamber music' so any better category suggestion would be welcomed!
  14. This piece here, despite the timing and the name of the piece, has nothing to do with the solar Eclipse this year. This piece was actually written back in 2012, and I've recently remastered it. It was wrote back when I was still very much into the ponies, and was actually inspired by Luna. The intro is meant to be grand, and fade into a sense of regalness while still keeping a dark undertone, signifying Luna's dark past. This piece starts off in f# minor, and then hits a mood change and goes to A Major in measure 82 until the last segment of the piece which is a modified version of the melody used from the center. This will be track number 8 on "Dust of the Past" when it is released.
  15. Hello, I am writing a composition including Cello and I would like to know if the double stops below are playable. Please help me! Regards, Maarten
  16. Hi all, this is my second Quartertone study, which I wrote in 2013, in my first semester at the Vienna University of music and performng arts. Looking forward to your feedback.
  17. Hello, I'm new to this site. I only got into music about 3 years ago (I'm 19 now) and I need help because this is my first composition. So I understand most musical jargon, but I'm wanting to study Composition next year at a Music Conservatorium. Constructive feedback would be awesome! I know the piece isn't perfect which is why I need help!
  18. I would like to share with you my new composition. It was exceptionally painful and frustrating to finish, but I hope that those emotions added a bit of an artistic and melancholic spice to this silly little piece. Enjoy and thank you for listening.
  19. Eviternity (Opus 24) is a piano monologue. Even though it has slight additions of cello, glockenspiel, and bass guitar as small ornaments to spice the whole work up, it is mostly a highlight on piano. I was not sure whether I can post it here, but I treat it as a piano work in the highest degree; the composition could be played as a soliloquy without any other instruments. I had some harmonic issues when writing this piece, so you may find slight dissonances. However, I left those unchanged in the end (I do not wish to stick to consonances all the time). This composition is also known as "the most cheesy work I've ever written." Thank you for listening!
  20. Trio in B-flat for Viola, Violoncello, and Contrabass I. Allegro spiritoso II. Adagio e sostenuto III. Menuetto: Allegro IV. Allegretto Composed: February 22 - May 26, 2014 Style: Classical, circa 1790 Though conceived as a mere amusement, this work ended up being for me an intensive study on how to handle a group of low-register instruments effectively in a chamber ensemble. Works for this very unusual instrumentation are exceedingly rare, as one may imagine, probably because of the challenges I faced in writing my own piece. Achieving clarity in an ensemble with so much bass sonority was rather difficult, but I believe I achieved it to some degree. Fortunately the players for whom I was writing it made the job easier. This trio was originally written for myself, a friend (an excellent ‘cellist), and my ex-boyfriend (a fine bassist) to play just for fun. This is one of several chamber works featuring the contrabass that I wrote with my ex-boyfriend in mind, and I learnt a lot about the capabilities of the instrument from writing them (I had never been much interested in the contrabass in chamber ensembles before I met him, but listening to him practice difficult passage work I would never have thought possible on the instrument fascinated me, besides which, affection prompts us do things we wouldn’t otherwise have the inclination to do). Both of the other players are better technicians than I am, so I was able to write parts for them that were somewhat demanding. The viola part I wrote for myself was also challenging for me, but carefully within my skillset, so all the parts are fairly equal. Description: The first movement (Allegro spiritoso), in Sonata-Allegro form, opens with a bold, vigourous 4-measure theme for all the instruments in unison, sweetened by a more lyrical melody in the ‘cello before being repeated. A transitional section follows, featuring the contrabass in sweeping scales and arpeggios, which modulates to the dominant of the dominant key, C major; the second theme, somewhat unusually, begins in C, with the ‘cello and ‘bass harmonizing in 10ths, and makes its way to the dominant key of F a few measures later. After a short codetta, the exposition is repeated, with the main theme slightly altered here and there. The development treats snippets of the main theme contrapuntally before modulating back to the tonic key for recapitulation. The second movement (Adagio e sostenuto), in binary form, is in the subdominant key of E-flat, and begins with a simple but expressive theme, which gives way to a transitional section led by the ‘cello. A more rhapsodic second theme follows with the viola and ‘cello harmonizing in 3rds and 6ths, accompanied by the ‘bass. The A and B themes are repeated, all in the tonic key, and coda based on the A theme closes the movement. The third movement (Allegro) is a Menuetto based on a 5-note motive that is repeated and developed throughout the main section of the movement. The contrasting Trio section, in the movement’s dominant key of F, is based on a sprightly theme characterized by leaps of 5ths and 6ths up and down. The main section is then repeated (Da Capo). The fourth and final movement (Allegretto), in Rondo form, begins with a somewhat droll “A” theme, which is then developed during a transitional section. Just when one expects the “B” theme to enter, a short fugato on a new subject is introduced, which leads into the actual “B” theme in the dominant key of F - humourous, and characterized by accented syncopations and sudden changes of dynamic. After a brief codetta, the “A” theme returns abbreviated, followed by a lyrical “C” theme. The “A” theme returns again, followed by yet another short but different fugato on the same subject as before, and the “B” theme returns in the tonic key. A variation of the “A” theme returns a final time, and a humourous and spirited coda ends the movement. This work was premiered in July 2014 by the ensemble for which it was written, at a cojffeehouse in Wichita, Kansas (where I was living at the time) which often features live music of all sorts, and was warmly received by the audience of patrons sipping coffee or having breakfast. Alas, the nature of the venue precluded a live recording being made - there was a fair amount of background noise as beverages and food were being served. Inasmuch as I have heard this work performed effectively, and I know it works, I have few concerns, but I am open to suggestions, comments, and criticisms as always. Players’ and Audience Comments: The players enjoyed playing the piece, and when I suggested a performance as part of the ‘cellist’s regular solo set at the coffeehouse, all were in agreement. The bassist, himself a fine composer as well as a university music theory teacher, was somewhat critical of the ‘bass accompaniment of the second theme in the slow movement because it didn’t seem like a characteristic period bass line, but that was the only criticism I received. The audience members made few comments other than to congratulate me. To my surprise, no one seemed even vaguely bemused by my choice of instrumentation, which I took as further evidence that I had made it work effectively. I did receive one criticism from a friend who frankly told me he hated the piece, saying that it was devoid of any treble sonorities and far too dark to be pleasant, but his was the only such comment. I hope you enjoy this rather unusual work! Cheers!
  21. Divertimento a 3 in B-flat, for 2 Violins and Violoncello I. Allegro di molto II. Andante III. Allegro giusto, alla breve Composed: April 4-17, 2017 Style: Classical, circa 1790 I enjoy spending my lunch hours at work productively when I have the energy, sketching or doing exercises. A couple of weeks ago I started a counterpoint exercise that I worked on for the next couple of days, and it turned out well. The thought occurred to me that perhaps it might serve as a movement in a larger work, in which I might also use some old ideas that had been waiting around in the back of my mind for years, and the idea for this little divertimento was born. Most of this work was written by hand while lunching in my car. The term divertimento denotes a multi-movement work that is light in character, for the diversion or amusement of the audience or players (or both), as the name implies. This one is in three movements, and is modeled after similar works I have played and heard by Joseph Haydn (1732-1809). It is quite short, much like Haydn’s examples, lasting just under 10 minutes. Description: The energetic first movement (Allegro di molto), in sonata-allegro form, is dominated by a dynamic 4-measure opening motive that I have had in my mind for many years, which I found opportunities to develop throughout the movement. The contrasting second theme, smoother and calmer than the first, is stated canonically by the two violins, accompanied by a chromatic accompaniment figure in the ‘cello adding harmonic complexity. The opening theme is then restated and developed into a codetta to close the exposition, which is then repeated. The development section treats part of main theme in close canon, modulating to distant keys to develop the second theme before making its way back to the tonic B-flat for the recapitulation, and the movement ends with a short coda, again based on the opening theme. The second movement (Andante), in the subdominant key of E-flat, is in the simplest of binary forms (ABAB), and begins somewhat statically, setting a mood of calm to contrast with the verve of first movement before gradually becoming more florid and interesting starting in m. 6. The second theme is a pretty melody I have had in the back of my mind for at least 30 years, patiently waiting for the right application, and now it has a place at last. The second time it comes around, the eighth note accompaniment is changed to sixteenth notes for variety. The movement closes with a very short coda, a varied restatement of mm. 11-12. The third and final movement (Allegro giusto, alla breve), originally conceived as the aforementioned counterpoint exercise, is a light-hearted fugue in an Italianate style, on an original 6-measure subject reminiscent of Handel. There are four statements of the subject by each of the instruments, including statements in stretto and an inverted statement, interspersed with episodes developing foregoing material. The movement closes with a coda based on the rhythm and contour of the last measure of the subject, on a pedal B-flat in the 1st violin and ‘cello alternately, ending in a plagal cadence. Concerns: 1st Movement – I’m a little worried that perhaps I have overdeveloped the opening motive by repeating it too often, even if I vary it – particularly the four chords at the beginning of it. I’m open to the idea of reworking the movement slightly if I get a lot of feedback that this is a problem. I love developing themes, but I want to avoid monotony. 3rd Movement – I’ve been writing counterpoint as a serious avocation for years, having listened to a lot of it and read several books on the subject. I even authored the very popular “Fugue Crash-Course” here before I knew as much as I know now, yet I still feel insecure and mystified. I try to proceed confidently, but since I have taught myself everything I know, I constantly worry that I’m making mistakes out of ignorance. It has happened before several times. I want to make sure what I’m doing is “by the book,” so if any of you notice anything in this fugue that you know for certain is wrong or mishandled, I want to know about it. I hope you enjoy this little piece, and thank you for your kind attention.
  22. Divertimento a 3 in F, for 2 Violins and Violoncello I. Allegretto grazioso (3/8) II. Andante (2/4) III. Allegro giusto, alla breve (cut time) Composed: 2011 Style: Classical, circa 1790 This work is the first of two such divertimenti for this instrumentation I have composed to date, the second of which having been written and posted here just recently. I consider it one of my more charming and attractive works – a personal favourite – and among my most ingenious, a tour de force of development and counterpoint (of which I am very proud) without being obvious about it. One hardly realizes that motives are continually being developed throughout both the first and second movements, in as unassuming a manner as possible. It is in three movements, and lasts 10-½ minutes. Description: The first movement (Allegretto grazioso), in Sonata-Allegro form, opens with a lilting, graceful theme of rising steps that ascend the scale in slurred pairs, followed by a series of descending scales in skittering triplets, and a few “sighing” gestures, that together I feel form one of my prettiest melodies. From it are then extracted the following three discrete motives that are developed almost constantly throughout the movement: The playful second theme contrasts with the elegance of the first before a pair of turns and a florid cadence transform it into something more refined. The development section further explores the possibilities of the various motives around a central sequence, and culminates in a rising and falling series of coupled steps (motive 1) on a pedal tone that brings the music to a very satisfying return of the opening theme in the recapitulation. The second movement (Andante), in binary form, is in the subdominant key of B-flat, and opens with a coquettish theme from which, as in the first movement, are extracted the following two discrete motives that are developed elsewhere in the movement: This theme is then repeated in the tonic minor, and through a surprising modulation makes its way to the movement’s dominant key of F. There is no second theme per se, but rather a contrapuntal development of the foregoing motives. The third and final movement (Allegro giusto, alla breve) is a rollicking, rather wacky fugue (how often does one hear those words together?) on a jaunty subject, beginning on a syncopation, and characterized by an unexpected, dissonant suspension, accented sforzando for humourous effect. The bass line to the subject, introduced in the ‘cello, is worked canonically into the entire exposition as if it were a second subject; hence the exposition functions much like a double fugue, though it doesn’t continue that way. I didn’t take the construction of this fugue too seriously (this was not a counterpoint exercise in earnest), being more interested in keeping it light and quirky; and although the subject begins on the fifth degree of the scale, I decided against the pedantic complexity of devising a tonal answer in the exposition – though otherwise it proceeds conventionally for the most part. Passing dissonances run rampant, and transitions and modulations are often purposely abrupt, taking unexpected turns intended to raise eyebrows, and a smile or two. After a final sequence on a pedal tone and a truncated statement of the subject, even though it feels like the movement should continue, in a rush it throws itself headlong to a sudden, crashing finish as if it hit a brick wall at a run. This is probably the oddest piece of counterpoint I’ve ever written, but I feel the jocular treatment of what is usually by its nature a serious form contrasts well with the sunny warmth and charm of the previous two movements. Premiere: This work was premiered in July 2016 by members of the Octava Chamber Orchestra, a community orchestra in the Seattle, Washington area, as part of a unique concert of Baroque and Classical music by living historicist composers. Although I regret I could not attend the performance, I did receive the recording of it that I have posted here below. The outer movements are played a bit too slowly, and there are some mistakes and inaccuracies; but I’m gratified that the players took the piece seriously and made a sincere attempt at a sensitive interpretation. Overall, it’s one of the better performances I’ve ever received, and I’m quite pleased (to say nothing of being honoured, and very fortunate). Musicians’ and Audience Feedback: My contact with Octava, who played 2nd Violin at the premiere, told me that the musicians loved the piece. Though they found it somewhat challenging here and there, they said it was well written for the instruments and a real pleasure to play, just as I had hoped; divertimenti are supposed to be fun! It was the first work on the programme, and was very warmly received by the audience. Thank you for your kind attention, and enjoy!
  23. Hello everyone, I'm new to this site, but it looks like a good place to get some feedback. Please take a listen to the attached piece for string quartet and let me know what you think!
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