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I think metal really lends itself well for a classically trained musician really. Ever hear apocalypica cello quartet? There are many similarities between the types of music. Using some darker modes (aeolian, phrydgian, locrian) may be interesting. I think there is a wide open field for constructing interesting harmonies if you want. Just remember that this type of music normally uses a set progression for a longer period of time so you can really make use of an interesting progression.

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Sheesh, the immaturity in this topic. I know the name of the site is YoungComposers.com, but I don't think that means everyone has to act like they're twelve.

So the story is this... I have an amateur band with few of my friends. And I ended up to be our composer (at least most of the time). The thing is that we are making metal music (mainly power-metal) and I only have classical training behind me and almost none composing experience. Well... we completed one song witch I really liked, but I composed it pretty accidentally :D (just played something whitch sounded good). After our first song I started really compose and I made some quite cool sounding peaces (at least I think so :D). Now when I have composed a while the songs I'm making are sounding quite similar... So what can I do to compose songs that differ from each other?? Any idea is welcome :D

For Power Metal, you'll typically be using diatonic harmonies and melodies, which basically means, pick a major or minor key and stick with it. You mentioned that your previous song was made when one of you "just played something which sounded good"...for a lot of popular music, well, that is the songwriting process. Play with different riffs in the style you're going for, find ones you like, and adjust them to fit into a song.

One thing power metal bands often do is harmonize guitars - one guitar plays the lead line, and the other duplicates it up or down a diatonic third. This creates a cool sound that is used by a lot of power metal and melodeath bands.

As for composing songs that differ with others, there are a lot of things you can do. Try coming up with things in a different order; if you normally start with lead guitar, instead begin with rhythm guitar or bass. You could also experiment with different harmony, perhaps trying a few chromatic chords (but be careful with those, since power metal general avoids a flood of dissonance; make things smooth). Listen to a lot of different bands and a lot of different composers and imitate ideas from all of them.

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  • 5 months later...

I did dabble in a little metal composition. One thing that gives it a good edge is the much dreaded minor third progression, usually followed by something a little more wholesome, maybe something like i - bIII - bVII - i. Also i - bVII is a pretty standard progression for the verse riff, especially in a lot of old Iron Maiden songs, speaking of which btw, if I had to recommend one song for major inspiration it would be "Phantom of the Opera", try finding a live version with Bruce Dickinson singing.

I don't recommend getting too experimental with drums, except for fills and slow tempo sections (Something I'd definitely recommend), because at high tempo, one very important element is the rythm.

Speaking of which don't be afraid to use a simple straightforward riff for the guitar under the vocals or the solo, because you want to give them center stage. Keep all your creativity for the fills and the sections between the vocals/solo.

Speaking of solos, don't just improvise on the scale, improvise on the chords, you get a much clearer, consistent sound that way.

Also, don't be afraid to use the whole triad for chords, or different kinds of chords for the matter, don't just fall back on powerchords, which are only a good tool if used for high speed verse sections and even then only to accompany the vocals.

Bands I'd recommend:

Iron Maiden (Pretty Catchy and very easy on the ear for non-Metal fans, considering how complex their stuff really is).

Dream Theater (Without the ELP inspired, self indulgent, improv sections, I love ELP... but no)

Old Metallica (Can't get more metal than old metallica)

Tarja Era Nightwish (Two words, effing amazing)

Cryptopsy (Say what you will about Death Metal, but if you REALLY want to be experimental, try listening to a couple of their tunes).

Cynic (Same as above, but a little easier on the ears, a little more melodic and very much more original)

Blind Guardian (Pretty good, and not your typical Power Metal band either)

Cradle of Filth (Not my favorite band, but if you have a keyboardist they are a great source of inspiration)

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I suggest you check out a GREAT classic death metal band called Death. Really fantastic stuff. YouTube - Death - Perennial Quest

YouTube - Death - Empty Words

There's one tried and true way of writing a metal song. Start with a good riff - come up with another riff - write a solo - and you got yourself the basis for a song. Then experiment with a few of those ideas with your band and you can start building upon them in unique ways. For instance, experiment with chopping up a riff and syncopating it or throw in a few odd time signatures. Unisons are also very cool if you use them right. Experiment.. ALOT. Remember that there's nothing that says you can't turn off the distortion or take it down a notch.

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Well... that might be how you compose metal like Black or Death Metal. But I meant more like this
kind of metal. Its not all screaming and stuff but its symphonic metal (at least Wikipedia says so).

Our first song in fact sounds pretty much like Nightwish.

I think symphonic metal uses a combination of synths, orchestra and normal metal instruments, so maybe you want help in getting those three to interact with each other in different ways to produce different songs?

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  • 3 months later...

My amatuer band also composes metal. we are just starting out. but when composing, firstly, think of whether the song is instrumental or not.

if looking for lyrics, try starting with a general topic and slowly moving to a more pin ponted objective in your lyrics. or, you could just say random words and link them. haha:D

for the chords, try to down tune you guitar(you should have done that alr) you can go as low as you want. haha, for the chords, since you are a classical player, try some of Yngwie Malmsteen's riff or get inspiration from them. his riffs are neo-classical but work real well with heavier music too!

try minors too. lets say you play d. to make it sound more dark, do a e flat. and add in some sweeps like combining the d and e flat arpeggios. pentatonics can also come in handy when out of ideas. try listening to paul gilbert for some inspiration. get some tips from his vids in youtube.

all the best!:)

Zaob

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  • 1 month later...
Loud annoying music that people whose brain levels don't exceed an snail's would listen to.

But seriously. It doesn't matter what you play. It's how loud you play. Just do generic chords (ex: I, IV, V, I) really fast and really, really loud. Oh, and scream a lot. Make lyrics (when you're not screaming) about society and how the government sucks and how life sucks and everything else sucks.

There you have it. Metal.

Actually, to create metal, you need to get some elements and perform covalent or ionic bonding.

Sorry to drag up an old topic but this is incredibly, incredibly short-sighted. Listen to Spawn of Possession or Timeghoul and realize how incorrect your stereotypes are.

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  • 11 years later...

People in this thread with negative comments and oversimplified advice about writing metal don't actually listen to or understand metal, friend.

That said, metal has more in common with classical music and jazz than any other genre. Classical because it's methodically written riffs and it's layout, and jazz because of it's syncopation and tendency to stray from musical ”standards.”

I play metal so I listen to a lot of metal. It's easy to box yourself in if you only listen to the genre you are writing for. Although, metal has more subgenres than most other styles so there is a lot of material. But listen to everything that inspires; no matter the genre.

Playing fast and loud is terrible advice for writing metal. Calling it an awful genre are the words of someone who doesn't love music as much as they think. They probably only like one or two genres.

Last pieces of advice are to 1. jam with lots of different people to get the ideas flowing. And 2. Although theory can box you in, it can push you through a plateau if you use it properly.

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On 10/16/2020 at 1:15 AM, Camzilla54 said:

People in this thread with negative comments and oversimplified advice about writing metal don't actually listen to or understand metal, friend.

That said, metal has more in common with classical music and jazz than any other genre. Classical because it's methodically written riffs and it's layout, and jazz because of it's syncopation and tendency to stray from musical ”standards.”

I play metal so I listen to a lot of metal. It's easy to box yourself in if you only listen to the genre you are writing for. Although, metal has more subgenres than most other styles so there is a lot of material. But listen to everything that inspires; no matter the genre.

Playing fast and loud is terrible advice for writing metal. Calling it an awful genre are the words of someone who doesn't love music as much as they think. They probably only like one or two genres.

Last pieces of advice are to 1. jam with lots of different people to get the ideas flowing. And 2. Although theory can box you in, it can push you through a plateau if you use it properly.

 

Bruh the thread is 13 years old.

These guys are long gone

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