Jump to content

OUTDATED: Air for Soprano & Piano - Sleep, my child


Jared Steven Destro
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here is another air for soprano and piano. Once again, the soprano voice is played by a flute (as both the range of the actual midi soprano has a more limited range and it sounds worse.) I also have the piano played by strings, as I think it sounds better. Let me know what you think!

 

UPDATE: This piece has been changed and moved into an updated collection here ------> 

 

PDF
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

First of all: I like it a lot. It's written in a  genuine baroque style. The introduction is perfect. The melody, too, with its ornaments, as in this type of bel canto.

What I don't undertand is why you use strings if it is written for piano? I think it would sound good with a harpischord sound, although it is in an absolute vertical pattern. With a keyboard I don't know if it would be "heavy". In this style of composition, the harpsichord can be played this way but because there are some instruments in background.

And some suggestions regarding the flut (voice):

1. The climax (highest note) appears twice, in bar 25 an bar 62. This climax is usually sung in the reexposition (da capo), not before. Or in the very last note of the piece.

2. In bar 62, I think is hard to attack such a high note without preparation. That is to say: suddenly.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Luis Hernández said:

Hi

First of all: Ir ha like it a lot. It's written in a  genuine baroque style. The introduction is perfect. The melody, too, with its ornaments, as in this type of bel canto.

What I don't undertand is why you use strings if it is written for piano? I think it would sound good with a harpischord sound, although it is in an absolute vertical pattern. With a keyboard I don't know if it would be "heavy". In this style of composition, the harpsichord can be played this way but because there are some instruments in background.

And some suggestions regarding the flut (voice):

1. The climax (highest note) appears twice, in bar 25 an bar 62. This climax is usually sung in the reexposition (da capo), not before. Or in the very last note of the piece.

2. In bar 62, I think is hard to attack such a high note without preparation. That is to say: suddenly.

 

 

 

Thanks for the input! I simply prefer the garritan strings to the garritan piano; in an actual performance, the real piano (or harpsichord, as you said -- maybe with lute stop :P) would be great.

I hadn't thought about that sudden jump in bar 62! I'll have to adjust that. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

There are some nice moments here.  I'm not comfortable with your prosidy in a number of parts though. 

m33, you have the vocalist singing the melisma on the r sound. (Possibly the ugliest sound a singer has to deal with! lol)  Perhaps m32 can all be "no",  "long-" can start in 33 and resolve the "er" on the Eb in measure 36.  The same thing appears again in mm66-69.  Here the problem is amplified by the range of the cadenza.

You're asking a lot as regards range from the singer.  Not many sopranos will be able to work these extremes.

You might want to keep it with strings, perhaps a string quartet?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...