Jump to content

ChristianPerrotta
 Share

Recommended Posts

So, I'm reposting old stuff because they're somehow gone. This is one of them. Enjoy^^

MP3
0:00
0:00
PDF
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No need to advertise on the chatbox I'd say, haha.
Regardless, I appreciate the consistency in this piece, at least in terms of keeping the fugue going. I've seen too many weak fugues that don't know how to develop themselves. This however, unfortunately led to some tones I don't think you intended, for example, m. 19 with the B-sharp and B-natural conflicting in the top two parts and 48 with the E and D-sharp. There are more instances of this. 
There are places where I feel the instruments didn't compliment each other necessarily... they were all kind of doing their own thing. Not a problem per se considering the setting and everything, but I felt more lost than engaged at those times. It's mostly when the theme passes off a little too quickly sometimes.
I don't know if you ever wanted this to be played, but bowings are going to be a necessity for something like this. It's not just an attention to detail thing... since you don't have a lot of slurs, it becomes a relatively big help in terms of rehearsal and learning the correct style. Also, the double stops at the end are a little tricky... can be done with practice but a lot more difficult than anything else in there.
It's not often where I immediately hear the intention of the composer in the piece's commencement; nicely done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a very hard to thing to write a good fugue, and I would consider this a good fugue.

This definitely felt hectic to me, but maybe not necessarily chaotic. I have to agree that there are points where I felt a little lost, but I'm not sure if that's a problem with my attention span or the piece itself.

This is most likely pure ignorance on my part, but I'm very confused by the gliss markings in m. 62 & 63. What exactly do those indicate?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, fishyfry said:

This is most likely pure ignorance on my part, but I'm very confused by the gliss markings in m. 62 & 63. What exactly do those indicate?

I could be wrong, but I believe that's just a way of showing how the melody and/or certain parts are transferring or progressing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, fishyfry said:

This is most likely pure ignorance on my part, but I'm very confused by the gliss markings in m. 62 & 63. What exactly do those indicate?

They are not glissando marks. They're just lines that indicate the movement of the fourth voice, which iss passing by the violins, making some other voices to change instrument as well. Just like Monarcheon said above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, ChristianPerrotta said:

They are not glissando marks. They're just lines that indicate the movement of the fourth voice, which iss passing by the violins, making some other voices to change instrument as well. Just like Monarcheon said above.

 

I've seen it a lot in piano music where there are many contrapuntal voices competing for attention on the grand staff. I liked this a lot too. You flirted with minor key excursions some, which added some needed variety. I think some of them could have bee extended longer, maybe as a middle section contrast.

The closest I ever get to a fugue is fugue-ish. So, well done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...