Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is an overture that I made dedicated to the state of Washington, it is called "Washingtonian Overture".  As i'm only 15 (soon to be 16), I haven't had any professional training on music composition, so I would appreciate some feedback on this.
Thank you for listening! 
 

Programs Used: Sibelius 7.5, Noteperformer

 

Edited by Samaa Alsamerraey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright. 
I think it's generally very good. A lot of the counterpoint is clever and feels very orchestral; both great pluses in a piece like this. I have a few notes for you:

  • A lot of transitions felt very forced, especially in your movements from big sections to softer sections, but still occasionally in the other way around. 
  • You stay in the E minor tonic way too much. This reminds me a lot of the 4th Brahms Symphony, which I'd suggest you listen to, since it extrapolates on what I'm trying to say. When you branch out it's lovely, I just wish there was more of it.
  • As a current resident of Washington State, why did you make this in E minor? There's plenty of things to be happy about here. :grin:
  • In your counterpoint, occasionally there were points where it uncharacteristically went in canon, and that's where a lot of the clashing tones came in. Sometimes when this happened, the notes were not so much clashing as they were resolved incorrectly, or without the fluidity it should have.
  • In addition to forced transitions, the piece felt sectionalized; it didn't flow very well. It felt more like a museum than a train ride, if you know what I mean.

Again, it's really nice and has a uniquely modern spin on romanticism, but there are a few things to tidy up, in my opinion.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your feedback. 

  • Since the transitions felt forced for you, how can I fix that? Because I've seen sudden forced transitions in great music before. A good example would be Hungarian Dance No. 4 by Brahms.   If you haven't listened to it already, you will notice that around 2:00 minutes into the piece, it suddenly and forcefully changes from F# minor to F# sharp major, which I think is pretty smart of him to do, but that's just me.
  • Symphony No.4 by Brahms has to be one of my favorite symphonies ever, no joke. I think that the point of the piece I composed is to be mostly E minor tonic though, but i'll try to include more chords such as Mediant and Dominant. 
  • Okay, how can I make them sound more fluid when transferring from minor to major key?
  • I wasn't planning on naming it Washingtonian until my father told me to do so, lol. :grin:
     
  • Like I said, an example would be Hungarian Dance No. 4. Oh, and another example of a great "sectionalized" piece would be Beethoven's 5th symphony, 4th movement. Around 3:30 minutes into the movement, it forcefully transformed from C major to C minor, which indicates that fluidity isn't always there, and that sectionalization can often occur in music pieces. 





     


 

Edited by Samaa Alsamerraey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I won't  deny that those sudden changes happen in the canon but it seems to happen way too often here, and after not that long a time; it doesn't sound deliberate. 

For example, Hovhaness's Mt. St. Helens piece (3rd movement) has an obvious intentional change of character at the eruption, but I think the transition back into the main melody at the end is unnecessarily forced and overlapped. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...