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Pacman12

A try at a 3 part fugue

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11 minutes ago, Monarcheon said:

What rules are you trying to adhere to?

 

right know im reading Fux's rules on fugues

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So there's a lot to unpack in yours. 
1. Tons of melodic leaps to dissonances, and leaps away from dissonances. Both of these are disallowed. 
2. The answer is neither real nor tonal, so it's not a true answer in the Baroque-sense. 
3. This style of counterpoint does not use the English cadence. Measure 16 can't use the minor 9th.
4. Lots of parallels. 10 has octaves in the beginning, octaves between m. 22-23.
Remember that the treatise only spells out forms of counterpoint. All the voice leading rules of the past still apply.

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14 minutes ago, Monarcheon said:

So there's a lot to unpack in yours. 
1. Tons of melodic leaps to dissonances, and leaps away from dissonances. Both of these are disallowed. 
2. The answer is neither real nor tonal, so it's not a true answer in the Baroque-sense. 
3. This style of counterpoint does not use the English cadence. Measure 16 can't use the minor 9th.
4. Lots of parallels. 10 has octaves in the beginning, octaves between m. 22-23.
Remember that the treatise only spells out forms of counterpoint. All the voice leading rules of the past still apply.

 

cool thanks for the critique. I will review what a answer should be

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I wonder why people want to write things following that rules. I would find more stimulating and challenging to write some dissonant counterpoint or something like that.

Of course I respect what everybody does. I accept doing these sort of pieces to learn.

Yes, Monarcheon has told most of the issues, here. There are also dissonances in strong points, see measure 14 E - F#

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17 minutes ago, Monarcheon said:

So there's a lot to unpack in yours. 
1. Tons of melodic leaps to dissonances, and leaps away from dissonances. Both of these are disallowed. 
2. The answer is neither real nor tonal, so it's not a true answer in the Baroque-sense. 
3. This style of counterpoint does not use the English cadence. Measure 16 can't use the minor 9th.
4. Lots of parallels. 10 has octaves in the beginning, octaves between m. 22-23.
Remember that the treatise only spells out forms of counterpoint. All the voice leading rules of the past still apply.

 

So in your view my main problem is the voice leading principles, not necessarily fugue form?

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1 minute ago, Luis Hernández said:

I would find more stimulating and challenging to write some dissonant counterpoint or something like that.

Writing true tonal counterpoint is arguably equal in difficulty to dissonant counterpoint, since they merit on reverse principles, with the exception of a larger focus on rhythm for the latter.

1 minute ago, Pacman12 said:

So in your view my main problem is the voice leading principles, not necessarily fugue form?

Fugue form could be improved by way of increasing the length of episodes and delaying the countersubject, but yes, it was mostly the voice leading rules that were ineffective.

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Yes I know it's difficult (I tried, haha). But at least is something different, "new".

Writing counterpoint in, strictly, the way of Fux or Bach or whoever is very hard, particularly if you manage more than two voices. Perhaps is a good idea starting with two voices.

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40 minutes ago, Monarcheon said:

So there's a lot to unpack in yours. 
1. Tons of melodic leaps to dissonances, and leaps away from dissonances. Both of these are disallowed. 
2. The answer is neither real nor tonal, so it's not a true answer in the Baroque-sense. 
3. This style of counterpoint does not use the English cadence. Measure 16 can't use the minor 9th.
4. Lots of parallels. 10 has octaves in the beginning, octaves between m. 22-23.
Remember that the treatise only spells out forms of counterpoint. All the voice leading rules of the past still apply.

 

I just saw the answer you were talking about being wrong, lol bad on my part

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20 hours ago, Monarcheon said:

Writing true tonal counterpoint is arguably equal in difficulty to dissonant counterpoint, since they merit on reverse principles, with the exception of a larger focus on rhythm for the latter.

Fugue form could be improved by way of increasing the length of episodes and delaying the countersubject, but yes, it was mostly the voice leading rules that were ineffective.

 

Heres an updated version

https://musescore.com/user/28048203/scores/5187160

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