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Þjóðlag (folksong) from Iceland Suite


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This is the fourth movement of Íslensk svíta (Icelandic suite) for piano solo. 

This movement is really a variations on a theme, the source being an Icelandic folksong, "Vísur vatnsenda-rósu." The piece has more of a cinematic feel to it than the other movements, and definitely requires more virtuosic abilities. There's also a certain edginess to this movement that, I think, contrasts nicely with the ebb-and-flow of the others. It was quite enjoyable to put together, so I do hope you all enjoy this, as well. Please let me know what feedback you have!

Word to the listener: there are a lot of quartal harmonies, whole tones scales, and juxtaposed fifths, so be prepared for a lot of dissonance. This piece is exciting to play (and hear), but don't say you weren't warned if it gives you an earache.

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9 minutes ago, Luis Hernández said:

Wonderful. I really notice the structure of variations, in a sort of crescendo.

I don't think this kind of harmonies lead to dissonances by themselves. It's all relative. The pieces flows quite well.

 

Thanks again, Luis! The suite progresses more and more into dissonances and "modern" harmonies, but I return to simplicity in the final movement, which I'm working on right now.

Sigh. It'll be nice to finally have this suite completed, after coming up with the idea almost a year ago...

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Gosh, that's amazing.

I'm very fond of the "Grandioso" and "Molto Allegro" parts (m140), those big chords and dissonances really got me.

Also, the theme is amost identical to Camargo Guarnieri's 2nd Symphony. He was a Brazillian composer, and one of my biggest influences. He's also uses quartal harmonies a lot. If you never heard it, please do. Here's a link for a recording of it. You can here the theme at 1'00"

I'm exited to listen to the last movement (and will also check the previous movements aswell). Keep at it!

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6 minutes ago, Jean Szulc said:

Gosh, that's amazing.

I'm very fond of the "Grandioso" and "Molto Allegro" parts (m140), those big chords and dissonances really got me.

Also, the theme is amost identical to Camargo Guarnieri's 2nd Symphony. He was a Brazillian composer, and one of my biggest influences. He's also uses quartal harmonies a lot. If you never heard it, please do. Here's a link for a recording of it. You can here the theme at 1'00"

I'm exited to listen to the last movement (and will also check the previous movements aswell). Keep at it!

 

I've never heard of Guarnieri but just listening to that short clip on YouTube, I think he's going to be a favorite! It sounds so Brazilian, and sort of like Gershwin, in a way. I love it!

Thanks for the feedback, and I'm glad you enjoyed it!

Edited by Tónskáld
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I think this is wonderful, particularly in context with the set. The jagged edges of some of the passages is a nice contrast to the more smooth passages in the previous works. But I appreciate the subtlety and restraint. The piece has jagged moments that set it apart, but it still has its own smooth passages that give it a certain contour. I especially like the use of the unisons, like at mss. 59-69, for example. It contains the same harmonic feel, and even though it still sounds a little "rough", it comes off as more gentle than other parts in the piece. And the animato is just a beautiful passage.

Great work! :D

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7 hours ago, SergeOfArniVillage said:

I think this is wonderful, particularly in context with the set. The jagged edges of some of the passages is a nice contrast to the more smooth passages in the previous works. But I appreciate the subtlety and restraint. The piece has jagged moments that set it apart, but it still has its own smooth passages that give it a certain contour. I especially like the use of the unisons, like at mss. 59-69, for example. It contains the same harmonic feel, and even though it still sounds a little "rough", it comes off as more gentle than other parts in the piece. And the animato is just a beautiful passage.

Great work! 😄

 

Awww, you always say the nicest things about my works! I myself am partial to this movement, as well—it's always fun to arrange a traditional song into more modern harmonies. For some reason, I'm a big fan of unison passages, so I tend to insert them into my works.

Thanks again for your kind comments. They mean a lot to me! 😊

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