Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

6 minutes ago, Ivan1791 said:

What works am I copying? I got inspiration from Mozart's Jupiter and Beethovens Eroica, but I don't think I'm copying that much.

Anyway it doesn't matter because now that I have heard what I created I'm simply ashamed of it. My biggest failure by far. I will just try to forget I ever composed that piece of rubbish, I knew I did some mistakes but the reality was too bad honestly and I got really annoyed with myself.

 

There are no mistakes in music, that's very subjective,  it really depends on what you intend to do and I don't see any mistakes here.

Technically this is a good piece, but it's not your style, it's mozart/beethoven style and they have already perfected it. I like when people write in their own style, it's always fun and interesting and so if you have other music that is more of your style, please share I would absolutely love to hear, even if you think it's not "perfect". 

And It's just my opinion and I am no expert. if you don't agree just scroll and ignore this forum, don't take it personally.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, antimusicale said:

 

There are no mistakes in music, that's very subjective,  it really depends on what you intend to do and I don't see any mistakes here.

Technically this is a good piece, but it's not your style, it's mozart/beethoven style and they have already perfected it. I like when people write in their own style, it's always fun and interesting and so if you have other music that is more of your style, please share I would absolutely love to hear, even if you think it's not "perfect". 

And It's just my opinion and I am no expert. if you don't agree just scroll and ignore this forum, don't take it personally.

 

 

Well, there are a ton. You can compare it with the revised version, but it is sucks. (The oboe sounds really bad and the woodwinds aren't loud enough for some reason.

I don't have a personal style I'm still learning. You can check my channel and there you will see all my works. I also have two posts of my piano and chamber music.

Edited by Ivan1791
MP3
0:00
0:00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/17/2020 at 12:32 AM, Ivan1791 said:

Good point. I did this piece with a very classical mindset. As you can see the horns and trumpets are playing notes of the harmonic series (or close to them). But if in the future I try to make another symphony I will probably use a more modern orchestration, but not much bigger because I still need to learn the basics of orchestration.

 

 

I still would change it.  It would be VERY frustrating for a french hornist to read this and the part is in concert. Matter of fact, the conductor might make you change, if not the librarian.  Although I respect why you did it, it's not a practice to do.  Old terminologies? yes.  Putting instruments in quixotical transpositions = major no-no!  Additionally, 1) you should put rehearsal numbers in your piece. 

2) Mark your score Violin 1 and Violin 2; or if you like as I do, Violin I and Violin II.

3.) At Measure 51, mark "divisi" in your score unless you want the double-stops

15 hours ago, Ivan1791 said:

Oh okay, although in this symphony I thought it would be okay to give that choice to the musicians that play the symphony. (I doubt it will ever be played by a real orchestra haha.) But you are right, I will use that next time if I feel like it is necessary. 

 

You never know when it will get played! We as composers have to always be ready! 🙂   Plus, the conductor needs to know what the composer's intent. Remember perfect practice makes perfect.  Do the right thing now so when the opportunity arises, one is ready! 

Catchy composition.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, nice work (although I'm not very fond of the style). The main concert is the lack of (more counterpoint), as can be heard from m. 110 to 132 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Maybe set it aside for a month or two. Get on with new pieces then when you revisit this you'll probably make a few changes. It's a way of "standing back" to see/hear the work through fresh ears.

We could all pick holes in the scoring but such crits relate to our own styles. You are your style in development and it's up to you to develop an ear for how well a work meets your aims. Developing a self-critical ear is vital so you can experiment. Even small nuances, an adjustment to a dynamic, a slight increase in a sustained note can make a big difference.

(quote)Well, there are a ton. You can compare it with the revised version, but it is sucks. (The oboe sounds really bad and the woodwinds aren't loud enough for some reason.(end quote)

And here, you see, you're wrestling with software, not the music. If you were working in a daw midi editor with a good sample library you'd have precise control over every note. You have to control not just what note is played but HOW it is played. Presumably you aren't in a position to change that immediately so we have to try to hear through the software limitations. Using a daw should definitely be on your horizon, though.

It's obviously worth considering all technical comments here - you can take them on; disregard them; or see if they give you ideas for things even better. Don't be afraid to experiment until you get the sound you want. Get the harmony put right if you think someone has spotted an error.

But no, it does NOT suck. It's a great effort and a worthy realisation. The harmony progresses smoothly. The development is thoroughly engaging; the tunes are good and stylistically consistent. It may need revision - a little touch up here and there but give it time to brew up!

It's a success....Very few people here can put together a formal work of this length let alone early in their development. You'll always be fighting your software....the solo entries weakened by being too quiet against the accompaniment; reiterated notes that barely sound separated (particularly in the strings where they'd be light and distinguishable played spiccato by live players). Some very good stuff has been buried by the software itself. Whether you can get around this or not, I can't know. But you definitely have the potential to justify investment in a decent daw and sample libraries. They may seem expensive but you'll be set forever! This piece would be note-wise the same but sound very different put through a daw.

Edited by Quinn
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, maestrowick said:

 

I still would change it.  It would be VERY frustrating for a french hornist to read this and the part is in concert. Matter of fact, the conductor might make you change, if not the librarian.  Although I respect why you did it, it's not a practice to do.  Old terminologies? yes.  Putting instruments in quixotical transpositions = major no-no!  Additionally, 1) you should put rehearsal numbers in your piece. 

2) Mark your score Violin 1 and Violin 2; or if you like as I do, Violin I and Violin II.

3.) At Measure 51, mark "divisi" in your score unless you want the double-stops

You never know when it will get played! We as composers have to always be ready! 🙂   Plus, the conductor needs to know what the composer's intent. Remember perfect practice makes perfect.  Do the right thing now so when the opportunity arises, one is ready! 

Catchy composition.

 

 

The horn player would bothered because the notes it plays are too high? Also I don't know what you mean with quixotical positions? 

Also I will put better instructions next time but I don't want this first try to be played by real musicians ever, I hated the final result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Luis Hernández said:

Hi, nice work (although I'm not very fond of the style). The main concert is the lack of (more counterpoint), as can be heard from m. 110 to 132 or so.

 

Yes, I could have add more, but I didn't know well where and how. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Quinn said:

Maybe set it aside for a month or two. Get on with new pieces then when you revisit this you'll probably make a few changes. It's a way of "standing back" to see/hear the work through fresh ears.

We could all pick holes in the scoring but such crits relate to our own styles. You are your style in development and it's up to you to develop an ear for how well a work meets your aims. Developing a self-critical ear is vital so you can experiment. Even small nuances, an adjustment to a dynamic, a slight increase in a sustained note can make a big difference.

(quote)Well, there are a ton. You can compare it with the revised version, but it is sucks. (The oboe sounds really bad and the woodwinds aren't loud enough for some reason.(end quote)

And here, you see, you're wrestling with software, not the music. If you were working in a daw midi editor with a good sample library you'd have precise control over every note. You have to control not just what note is played but HOW it is played. Presumably you aren't in a position to change that immediately so we have to try to hear through the software limitations. Using a daw should definitely be on your horizon, though.

It's obviously worth considering all technical comments here - you can take them on; disregard them; or see if they give you ideas for things even better. Don't be afraid to experiment until you get the sound you want. Get the harmony put right if you think someone has spotted an error.

But no, it does NOT suck. It's a great effort and a worthy realisation. The harmony progresses smoothly. The development is thoroughly engaging; the tunes are good and stylistically consistent. It may need revision - a little touch up here and there but give it time to brew up!

It's a success....Very few people here can put together a formal work of this length let alone early in their development. You'll always be fighting your software....the solo entries weakened by being too quiet against the accompaniment; reiterated notes that barely sound separated (particularly in the strings where they'd be light and distinguishable played spiccato by live players). Some very good stuff has been buried by the software itself. Whether you can get around this or not, I can't know. But you definitely have the potential to justify investment in a decent daw and sample libraries. They may seem expensive but you'll be set forever! This piece would be note-wise the same but sound very different put through a daw.

 

Well, thank you a lot for the comment. 

I really have no idea of how to see my own work, I tend to hate it right after I finish the work because I'm very demanding with myself. I also could have a distorted view on some of my music, I don't know. 

 

A friend of mine also told me to change libraries and find something better, I did it yesterday and that's why the revised version sounds different. I will still keep seeking for the best option for me because it still sounds bad to me. 

 

I will try to see if I dislike less my orchestral piece in around a month. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Ivan1791 said:

Well, thank you a lot for the comment. 

I really have no idea of how to see my own work, I tend to hate it right after I finish the work because I'm very demanding with myself. I also could have a distorted view on some of my music, I don't know. 

 

A friend of mine also told me to change libraries and find something better, I did it yesterday and that's why the revised version sounds different. I will still keep seeking for the best option for me because it still sounds bad to me. 

 

I will try to see if I dislike less my orchestral piece in around a month. 

 

It's probable that most of us are dissatisfied with some of our work some of the time but we have to move forward. Most of us "get better" as we do unless we're stuck in a rut.

It may not always seem that way but in small ways each new work is new experience building on what we've already done. It took Beethoven roughly 30 years to get from his first symphony to his ninth and we see massive development throughout. Who would have thought that Beethoven's last String Quartet (Op 135) came from the same composer as Für Elise?

I still recommend you look for a daw. Have a look at Reaper. For small businesses and lone composers it's very reasonably priced and has an excellent midi editor....not so good at producing a notation view though.

So...well, try to be positive. You have every reason to be. If you've decided you're going to hate all you compose you'll hit problems sooner or later, be discouraged from experimenting and developing your own voice. The good: you completed this movement; good: you've acquired much knowledge and skill. You can be optimistic about starting a new work and view any struggles as strengths as you overcome them. 

Most of us, I bet, get frustrated when things don't seem to go right. And I, for a start don't like about half the stuff in my 'catalogue'. I haven't thrown it in the musical recycle bin in case I ever have time to see if anything can be rescued from it. I've become a cut-and-paste, split-and-splice merchant to be sure.

But then, there's always something about which I can feel some satisfaction - and that urges me on. I hope it's the same for you.

.

 

 

Edited by Quinn
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I had a look at the Horn parts myself and you'd be perfectly ok with a "period orchestra" that would have crooks in both Cs. It would be tiring for a player with an F/Bflat horn but it could be done with a triple horn: F/Bflat/high F, the sort that horn players specialising in Handel-type music use. It's useful to visualise (or on a separate piece of paper) what the transposition for an F horn would look like. It'll give you some idea of what you're expecting. Prolonged playing at or above high G (transposed) would be very tiring. But as I say, on a triple horn these things are possible. 

Edited by Quinn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Quinn said:

It's probable that most of us are dissatisfied with some of our work some of the time but we have to move forward. Most of us "get better" as we do unless we're stuck in a rut.

It may not always seem that way but in small ways each new work is new experience building on what we've already done. It took Beethoven roughly 30 years to get from his first symphony to his ninth and we see massive development throughout. Who would have thought that Beethoven's last String Quartet (Op 135) came from the same composer as Für Elise?

So...well, try to be positive. You have every reason to be. If you've decided you're going to hate all you compose you'll hit problems sooner or later, be discouraged from experimenting and developing your own voice. The good: you completed this movement; good: you've acquired much knowledge and skill. You can be optimistic about starting a new work and view any struggles as strengths as you overcome them. 

Most of us, I bet, get frustrated when things don't seem to go right. And I, for a start don't like about half the stuff in my 'catalogue'. I haven't thrown it in the musical recycle bin in case I ever have time to see if anything can be rescued from it. I've become a cut-and-paste, split-and-splice merchant to be sure.

But then, there's always something about which I can feel some satisfaction - and that urges me on. I hope it's the same for you.

.

 

 

 

I usually like more my older works than my recent ones, it is quite common in me. I also used to leave a lot of works unfinished, but for some reason a day I got motivation and since then I always try to complete my works and try to improve. 

Being honest although it is a very unrealistic desire my dream is to make people in general enjoy classical music once more, like, everyone. I want to create works with a real purpose (right now the purpose of my compositions are to improve and express some of my emotions).

 

(By the way, great comment.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Quinn said:

I had a look at the Horn parts myself and you'd be perfectly ok with a "period orchestra" that would have crooks in both Cs. It would be tiring for a player with an F/Bflat horn but it could be done with a triple horn: F/Bflat/high F, the sort that horn players specialising in Handel-type music use. It's useful to visualise (or on a separate piece of paper) what the transposition for an F horn would look like. It'll give you some idea of what you're expecting. Prolonged playing at high G (written/transposed) would be very tiring. But as I say, on a triple horn these things are possible. 

 

Exactly, I composed that having in mind the kind of trumpets and horns Mozart would have used for for example his Linz symphony in C major. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I really , really, really liked this movement (proably is one of the small cases that I listen to all the pice in one take). I have not much knowlage of music theory or orchestration but to me it sounded great. It does sound like a piece of a late Mozart or early Beethoven but I see no problem in that (if fact I would see it rather as a compliment) as in art I feel you do not need to be always innovative.

Good artists borrow, great artists steal.”

- Pablo Picasso

Lesser artists borrow, great artists steal.”

- Igor Stravinski

“Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal"

- T.S Eliot

 

Edited by Hendrik Meniere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Hendrik Meniere said:

I really , really, really liked this movement (proably is one of the small cases that I listen to all the pice in one take). I have not much knowlage of music theory or orchestration but to me it sounded great. It does sound like a piece of a late Mozart or early Beethoven but I see no problem in that (if fact I would see it rather as a compliment) as in art I feel you do not need to be always innovative.

Good artists borrow, great artists steal.”

- Pablo Picasso

Lesser artists borrow, great artists steal.”

- Igor Stravinski

“Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal"

- T.S Eliot

 

 

Well, thank you for listening to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/18/2020 at 10:10 PM, Quinn said:

It's probable that most of us are dissatisfied with some of our work some of the time but we have to move forward. Most of us "get better" as we do unless we're stuck in a rut.

It may not always seem that way but in small ways each new work is new experience building on what we've already done. It took Beethoven roughly 30 years to get from his first symphony to his ninth and we see massive development throughout. Who would have thought that Beethoven's last String Quartet (Op 135) came from the same composer as Für Elise?

I still recommend you look for a daw. Have a look at Reaper. For small businesses and lone composers it's very reasonably priced and has an excellent midi editor....not so good at producing a notation view though.

So...well, try to be positive. You have every reason to be. If you've decided you're going to hate all you compose you'll hit problems sooner or later, be discouraged from experimenting and developing your own voice. The good: you completed this movement; good: you've acquired much knowledge and skill. You can be optimistic about starting a new work and view any struggles as strengths as you overcome them. 

Most of us, I bet, get frustrated when things don't seem to go right. And I, for a start don't like about half the stuff in my 'catalogue'. I haven't thrown it in the musical recycle bin in case I ever have time to see if anything can be rescued from it. I've become a cut-and-paste, split-and-splice merchant to be sure.

But then, there's always something about which I can feel some satisfaction - and that urges me on. I hope it's the same for you.

.

 

 

 

At the end I even posted an animated version haha.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...