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EmperorWeeGeeII

Bachelor Music Composition Courses In Canada?

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So here is my situation; I am still in high school, when you go to college after high school, you go for a bachelor course, right? (not entirely familiar with how all of this works outside my country).

 

If so, which college/univeristies offer the best bachelor music composition courses?  I am intrested in the canadian ones (preferably in the 'english speaking areas', heh)

 

BTW i don't have all that much money, i am kind of in the same situation as ChristianPerrotta; i want to study, work and live abroad, graduating in Canada could give me intresting oportunities to achieve that goal. There is plenty of time though.

 

(I did some research and found Wilfrid Laurier and University of Toronto, but i can't tell if they are good or not, or which one will weight less in my pockets :p )

 

Also, thanks guys. The only reason i didn't ask this at ChristianPerrotta's topic is because it would dodge the focus on his question.

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Free healthcare! hahaha....only downpart of canada is that Justin Bieber came from there! XD

I love Canada, but I wouldn't know what's the best school for composition, there! =P

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Don't know much about Canadian schools (especially their music departments)....I know University of Toronto is good, Mcgill is another big one. I honestly don't see any advantages to go to Canada for music education....unless you plan on going on to a bigger, well known university for Grad school.

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I wouldn't worry too much about the name of the school, more about the professors.  The music community isn't so very large that people don't know each other.  If you apply to grad school and go in for an interview, the music faculty is likely to say, "Oh!  You studied at McGill?  Is Julia still there?"  If you say you went to Julliard, then even non-music people will have heard of it and be impressed (without knowing a thing about it), but within the music community itself, I'm not sure it matters as much as what you actually learn, and who your main teachers were.  Big name schools get their reputations for a reason, but there are lots of good smaller programs that are excellent, where you will get lots more individual attention, get to know your professors well, and as a result, they'll get on the phone for you and call their friend in the graduate program at ____, and be able to tell them all about how wonderful you are.  

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Yeah well i am not that worried about the name of the school, i am just looking for one that is good (the one which has the best professors, methods, etc), any ideas?

 

BTW did some more research and found the Alberta Conservatory, the Royal Conservatory and Acadia University.

Edited by EmperorWeeGeeII

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I'm still not entirely sure (and not to belabor the point or anything) why you want to go to school in Canada though. Don't get me wrong, I like Canada (and it probably is better than most places, including the good 'ole USA), but going there to get a degree in music seems risky to me. You're better off going to Europe then for your education.

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I know nothing, sorry.  Got anybody local to you that you could ask too?  

 

I just googled "canadian composer contemporary professor" and got links to some articles.  Flick through and see where people who are mentioned taught or studied.  Better yet if they are still alive.  If they are good enough to pop up in that sort of google search, the music programs they are associated with are probably worth a look.  If one particular music program is mentioned repeatedly that's definitely a good sign.  

 

So far I see mentions of The Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto (3 mentions), University of British Columbia, The Conservatoire de Musique du Quebec in Montreal, University of Toronto, Wilfrid Laurier University, University of Calgary, Queen's University School of Music (highlighted as having produced many of Canada's major composers), the Schulich School of Music at McGill University...

 

I'm also seeing a pattern that many of these contemporary composers got their start in Canada, but then went to Europe to continue their studies with a Masters or Doctorate degree.  

 

Google contemporary composers:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contemporary_classical_music  

Find out where all the people mentioned in this article studied and teach, be it Canada, or elsewhere.  (:

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