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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/21/2021 in all areas

  1. (I pretty much copied the description of my video for this commentary.) The story with this piece is quite interesting. On the 22th of December of last year I woke up a bit late, and as it is common in me I was tired and I tried to keep sleeping. But for some reason some negative thoughts about a friendship hit me and made me feel bad and guilty (don't ask personal questions please, thanks), and out of nowhere the Rachmaninoff-like passage of this piece came to my mind. It felt as if my mind was trying to say "sorry" through music because I struggle with words sometimes. The thing is that I decided to go to my piano to write down the fragment because I considered it was too good to let it slip from my hands (at the time I had no idea it was similar to the 3rd movement of Rachmaninoff's 3rd symphony)(there is also a bit similar to Chopin's Op.10 No.3). So this piece pretty much originated from a dream, because I wasn't really awake (I ususally know when I'm dreaming). I even cried when I found the Ebm7 chord with that dissonant leap that goes to the 9th, and I don't think I have ever composed anything else so straight from my heart. The last section also hit me pretty hard when I got it (yeah, I cried again...), but I actually almost improvised it, I never experienced such fluency in a composition. The piece still took me 10 hours to make. Due to some thematic connections, style and a suggestion by my friend Ferran I decided to combine this piece with Nostalgia and create a small set. It will be called "Two dream fantasies". Another detail I could mention is that the repeated chords at the beginning are inspired by my friend Theodore Servin. I hope you enjoy the piece and that you can feel all the emotion I poured into it. 🙂
    2 points
  2. forgot everything is relative and we're all five years old inside. Oh wait thats you
    2 points
  3. ok well my best is.. well, way better than that, I dont know why you think youre coming from a position of such authority lol.
    2 points
  4. Like I give a damn what you are "skeptical" of or not. You're a fuking moron, dude. That's why I and most of the active members here have you on ignore. Yes, I wrote a complete ebook and course to teach beginners (like yourself) about writing melodies with the same kind of energy and catchiness of something like Star Wars, the different theory and technical considerations and putting my own 20 years of writing music experience, which I got my first professional jobs when I was still in highschool, and perspective into it and don't feel inclined to give it away for free on a forum post. I know that irks you since you're one of these commie types, which is also why you loathe the notion that anyone on here is superior to you in skill (almost everyone is); that you're not "equal". But hey, why don't you just give that knowledge away for free in this thread, then? Because you don't know sh!t, and are of no help to anyone, that's why. I don't have to justify or prove anything to the likes of you. Though I find this claim of yours hilarious since you doubtlessly consume tons of the same recycled corporate garbage yourself. Here's this free market thing in action: Don't buy it, a$$hole. Hey, let's call up every teacher in wherever you live and make sure they have your approval before offering lessons, shall we? They'd tell you to go fck yourself, as you rightly should. If it's "Just another book on the pile" maybe you should reach into that pile, because it's obvious from your work that you never have. Now fck off, crack open another bottle of soylent and go make another lo-fi ambient tune or meager attempt at rock music that still, after all this time, sounds like a 13-year-old who just pirated garage band whilst acting like some snide, accomplished guru.
    2 points
  5. Very nice and congratulations! The piece is surprisingly seamless for a classical-era improvisation. It is very sweet and pleasing to the ear. Thanks for sharing!
    2 points
  6. Hello, I am posting a short Scherzo, which I recently completed. It was great fun to experiment with some chromatics and dissonances, I am very curious to know what you think of it. . Scherzo in A-minor.mp3
    1 point
  7. It's a solid piece. I like the adventurous attitude of it all. There is a very symmetrical sort of harmony going on. Not saying it's bad, if harmony is your concern, you may want to have a look at that.
    1 point
  8. Short critique - if I give you too much of something or the same thing over and over again, then you'll appreciate it less and less over time. You'll become desensitized to it. To get straight to the point, your use of "power" chords is a bit overwhelming - using the low range of the bass instruments with a P5. I'm primarily talking about the first movement. I respect the original ideas, however, I wasn't pulled in by anything you presented. Of course, it's a matter of opinion and we are each entitled to our own. It's astonishing that you put this much work into your work - I respect that. 47 minutes is a crazy long period of time to sit down and listen to something. I imagine this took a while to write. Kudos on finishing a long project!
    1 point
  9. A piece for strings ensemble I composed I hope you like it.
    1 point
  10. This World War Two symphony opens with the Prelude Movement, which paints a bleak picture of the world as it was just prior to the outbreak of war in Europe. This first of six movements introduces the Allies theme and then the German theme, which slowly builds to the Nazi theme. Please let me know what you think about this piece that was composed and sequenced entirely on the Roland FA-06 Workstation and recorded on the Tascam SD-24. I did some light processing with Audacity. https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/JiTty
    1 point
  11. Sometimes all we need as composers and musicians is to just know our work was heard/enjoyed. I thank you for taking the time to listen, comment, and share some of your thoughts. Yes, melodies are just a way to carry the textures and ideas forward. All of my music, if you can recall, is strung about with the most basic foundation for what a melody can be at certain points. Melody is just another tool to use rather than something I rely on, and I wait to use it for when I think a section needs it. The backgrounds, overall texture, feelings, and rhythms/sonorities are what I am really focusing on as I write. And I think it helps add a unique Evan Erickson flair to my works to focus on this pseudo-minimalism + fun/groovy percussive style. Leitmotif/motif usage in my works is what I really focus on to tie my works together, and I find having shorter melodies and less developed melodies helps me when calling back to it later. Your ear recognizes it easier when it comes back or is altered slightly. I am really happy you hear the music box/toy qualities, too! "Toy Box Suite" was just a name I threw that stuck because the instrumentation and how I wanted to use it really just reminded me of like those toy xylophones you use as a kid. It is meant to be very metallic and robotic, but extremely fun to follow. It means a lot that it did leave this impression on you, and I learned a bit more about Prokofiev from you today. Thank you for always listening to and supporting my music, Peter. Evan
    1 point
  12. Wow ... you're a clarinetist! And you composed a delightful percussion work. I am impressed. What prompted you to write this piece? Did you have a percussionist review it?
    1 point
  13. I like the ending, I thought the unexpected non-tonic final chord was a perfect way to close the piece, and it fit the piece very well emotionally speaking.
    1 point
  14. Ivan, this is wonderful! I genuinely think this is your best and most beautiful piece yet! And in spite of what you said, I think your performance is great, it truly captures the character of the piece perfectly, and the way you shaped the melodic lines was excellent. I'm glad you posted this piece, it's really wonderful.
    1 point
  15. Thank you so much for your comment... I added the PDF...
    1 point
  16. This is like the perfect description I think. Even I think the exposition was lacking in clarity and coherence and so I tried to tie in together the piece as a whole concept except of concentrating on individual qualities which make up a sonata. It has been a while after I composed this and you're right. Sometimes it feels like the music is just there for the sake of cycling chord progressions like the introductions of the first and third movements without having an everpresent theme. I think it was experimental although I can't remember why I composed it that way. I was obsessed with the idea of the theme just emerging out of nothing just like how a "Phoenix" rises from the ashes just like nothing. So that explains the unconventional exposition. That being said I do acknowledge that this sonata has instances which could have been made more interesting. Thanks for listening!
    1 point
  17. In The Night .mp3 A short piece about night-time with the intention to sound relaxing.
    1 point
  18. Thanks Peter, once again, for your comments. It was a big piece for me and took a long time, I wasn't trying to mimic the exact birds, but I did take a lot of walks birding when the pandemic hit, and this piece was my impression of those experiences.
    1 point
  19. I like this piece. As the previous member has said it has a simplicity about it which is really endearing and engaging. It reminded me of Spiegel im Spiegel by Arvo Part in its development. Its really nicely executed as well. Thanks for sharing it. Good luck with the Youtube channel.
    1 point
  20. I love the simple piano introduction and how the violin slowly joins in the lines. It seems to come from the same universe of sound as Erik Satie's pieces. This however seems somehow more substantial than that. I think this piece does a very good job of balancing simplicity and complexity. Everything in this piece is carefully considered and artfully executed. It would have been easy to turn this piece into something kitschy but you created a beauty. Nice job and thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  21. "Cross" as in miffed. They agree on one point - she doesn't like the curriculum and he doesn't like teaching it. 😄 Have you pondered a more sedate variation? (Which would probably mean two. The swing variation is already more relaxed so a slower one would have to be added on the end - which in turn would mean a more demanding finale.) 'With orchestra' is a good idea but I hear it more as a piano concertante with the orchestra being an accompaniment. Sort of Rachmaninov's Variations on Paganini.
    1 point
  22. beautiful piece and wonderfully performed. Would to get a copy of this piece to play-Ballade in F-sharp minor sheet music how can i purchase a copy from you valdez
    1 point
  23. Now that you mention it, I might add the voice parts later. We'll see.
    1 point
  24. This reminds me of something out a sim city soundtrack. (Simcity 3000 and 4, to be precise.) But clearly a bunch more ominous. I think only problem I see is the piano is too dry. You could've processed it a little more so it blends better with the windchime-drone stuff going on. Also, it's a little on the short side. I would've honestly maybe made each section just a tiny bit longer, specially the start. I think it starts too fast and it moves a little too quickly. On second thought, maybe the whole thing could be slower in general. It would give time for the ambience to have more of an effect. I do really like the sudden "major" turns the harmony does (0:44.) Cool stuff.
    1 point
  25. Thank you for the feedback! I appreciated it and I'll keep in mind what you said!
    1 point
  26. Trying to get some experience writing counterpoint. Constructive feedback is much appreciated!
    1 point
  27. The method was really different than what I usually did. I just had a single "D" note as my starting point and then it was a chain of analog synths, after which there were a few pattern randomizers too thrown in. But no, it wasn't really something using a system of any sort, just whatever sounded more interesting at the moment.
    1 point
  28. Hey, I think you totally accomplish what you set out to do with this piece! The harmony and the counterpoint of the canon make a lot of sense together. It's very uplifting and eventually epic, just like you said. I am having a hard time though imagining where the voices would have fit into this? Do you not have choir patches that you could have used to simulate how it would have sounded with the voices? I think my favorite part is at 3:34 - that sounds pretty epic to me. It almost sounds like an overture of sorts if you're looking for better titles than what you've got. It ends well also - pretty conclusive if you ask me. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  29. Really? It seems to have said a few things that needed to be said even if I couldn't read several posts that led to the exchanges. AND suggested to the o/p: learn more about your craft preferably with a guiding hand/ear. Happy New Year to you too and everyone for that matter.
    1 point
  30. Cope (seethe) harder But surely he is then looking for something that is tangible? Things that connect the great melodies of the great melody writers? This is why I don't see the value in saying "just study scores" because that should be a given. Studying scores you like should just be a default thing. The entire purpose of music education is (or at least was supposed to be) to pass on to new composers that knowledge you're expecting them to glean from score study and save them a lot of time instead of forcing them to start at square one and rediscover the wheel all the time. Why not just give them those answers? The harsh reality is, the only reason I can see people not defaulting to that is because they don't know themselves. As an example, it would put someone who wants to write like John Williams "Heroic" themes a lot more on the right path to talk about the kinds of voice-leading and disjunct motion, rhythms, etc. of those melodies than it is to just say "study John Williams". Earlier, there was some screeching about "correlation = / = causation", a common Clown Academy talking point meant to discourage pattern recognition entirely. What this fails to account for is the existence of control groups, which expose that the correlation is indeed the causation. When one batch of melodies is generally agreed to be good and they all share X traits, but the second group of melodies generally agreed to suck don't contain those traits: It is because of the traits shared in the former group. And we have a LOT of music to examine over literally centuries that developed into a specific craft and frankly, a science unto itself. OP will find that there is consistency, outside of pure stylistic considerations, between what makes a great Metal tune and a great Romantic piece. They require no explanation, no particular "context" or exposure to be enjoyed by most people: They just know it's good right away. That's what one needs to master if they want to write music. Not pursue abstract and "emotional" concepts that (allegedly) appeal to a very small minority of people but is typically met with visceral disgust from the rest of the people. And OP explicitly stated he is not out to appeal to said minority. That really sums up my feelings on this whole thread.
    1 point
  31. This is absolutely beautiful! Scored with so much passion - love it.
    1 point
  32. I composed the theme of Ophelia's painting, a masterpiece of John Everett Millais. Ophelia is one of the characters in Shakespeare's play 'Hamlet', who was caught up in the tragic situations of the work and became mad, drowned while making a flower crown by the stream. Ophelia in the painting looks so beautiful at first glance, but the sadness and tragic situation of Ophelia impressed me! So I combined the beauty of the painting with the tragic situations of Ophelia and expressed it in this piece! Death of Ophelia mp3.mp3
    1 point
  33. It certainly is heroic, how it goes from the mystery turning into drama of the minor key to the glorious key of F major. Once again, I am reminded of the Pathetique Sonata, this time because of the octave alternations going on in both hands. It also sort of reminds me of the Appassionata Sonata with just how much is in the bass. I happen to have started a heroic piece about a month ago and this one's a biggie for me, it means my dream as a composer is so close now. It's taken 4 years to go from conception of the idea to the start of the execution of said idea. It's my first symphony and I posted about it a couple days ago here: My dream as a composer is to write a piano concerto, and if I can compose a symphony, I know I'm very close to achieving said dream. Anyway, I love all the movements of your sonata and I think they go well together as well as working well individually.
    1 point
  34. I think your piano trio is an exercise in constant variation while still staying related to the beginning. It's cool though that it manages to return to the original theme towards the end. I'd say it doesn't however have a very conclusive ending - it just stops. I personally found it interesting and entertaining though a bit muted. It never really flourishes to its full potential imo. Like - there's no climax or high point to which it builds. It develops mostly through rhythmic diminution and harmonic changes making it sound more exciting and full of motion. I guess I feel like the dynamics in the piece are a bit flat and could stand to grow more. The way you developed the piece I think is very interesting though. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  35. I like the fact tho this thread raises so many fundamental questions about being a composer!
    1 point
  36. Beautifully written and it tells the story so nicely and precisely without ever being shallow or merely descriptive. I particularly enjoyed the harmony instability in the flowers section, and the theme is memorable and powerful. Thank you!
    1 point
  37. Four fugues and 3 preludes (or whatever these can be called.) The counterpoint and style is mostly quite free, I took a lot of liberties with harmonies and voice leading if I thought it was interesting, so there's inevitably going to be parallel motion, but I think I'd rather take that than make it bland. It's been quite a long time since I've written this kind of music so it was really refreshing to go back to "my roots" and have fun with it. As for technical matters, the subjects for the fugues, save for the first one, are strange on purpose. Specially C minor and the second double fugue subject in the D minor fugue. I mean, they're workable, but I'm constantly harmonizing "against" the subjects, so this leads to some pretty fun moments like a subject that's supposed to be in G minor tonic being harmonized in Ebmajor, stuff like that. It was pretty challenging to get all of this done and stay somewhat inside the style of instrumental counterpoint that I like. The double fugue in D was hard to write and it went on for longer than I had anticipated, even after cutting all the fat. If there's something I realized when writing these things is that I have very little tolerance for sequencing that is there for the purpose of padding out the runtime of the piece. So I try to never sequence anything more than 3 times, and I will vary the amount between 3 and 2 depending on context. It's one of the trappings on the style and I understand better now a lot of composers that worked in this style post-baroque times, specially within the context of a sonata's development episode vs the way sequencing is used in a fugue. Combining both things is very difficult from both a conceptual and technical point of view. In fact, I grouped these fugues together (I wrote them in sequence within the span of 2 weeks or so) and in the end I feel this is also sort of, kind of, like a sonata. Even if there's no "sonata form" in these, but then, I get the feeling that the DNA of the thing is more leaning in that direction than something like Bach. I purposely avoided reusing countersubjects when I could help it, too, as to give myself more freedom to write whatever was more appropriate within the context of that moment, but that also has the unintended side effect that the whole thing feels a lot more complex than it really is (certainly felt that way when I was writing it.) I get the feeling that a lot of the typical baroque counterpoint conventions and traditions end up being shortcuts to pad out time, so I kind of didn't want to use them. If anything was too "automatic" I would cut it and rewrite, and I did this the entire time when writing. I have no idea if that's something audible, but well there you go. As for the score, it's not completed yet. All the music is there, but I need registration markings and a bunch of other things that I'm not going to write until meet up with the person who will be performing these, so we can work out the details together at an actual organ. It's easier that way. Edit: Guhhh, fixed IV's key signature to something sane. oops. 01-fugue in e.mp3 02-fugue in h.mp3 03-fugue in c.mp3 04-fugue in d.mp3
    1 point
  38. What a well crafted and enjoyable work this is ... the engraving is beautiful to behold. The music tells the story well and is balanced. It easily carries the listener along for the journey. The harmonic changes are seamless and the rhythmic variations in good proportion. I really enjoyed following along with the score ... it is so well written. Well Done!
    1 point
  39. I think one of the key things to look at is context. Someone can enjoy an extremely modern concert and have no foundation for enjoying that music. Why? Because it's high and mighty. It's a 'thing.' It's like having caviar. However if you played that music to someone out the blue, they may want to strangle you. A hollowed out coffee can may make great music for a film, depending on where you put it. Being the artist is about controlling the context. No matter the genre You have to understand where your listener is coming from, this might be deeper than you think. In other words someone may or may not listen to it just for pure life experience others education, others want to smoke weed to it, or it maybe just serves as a record for your own life experience.
    1 point
  40. Found someone who wanted to play it for real... Music mp3.mp3
    1 point
  41. I've come to realize that it's a linguistics matter more than anything else. It's like this: depending on the musical style/language you use, you can make use of devices that people have a common understanding of, so that you can pursue more complicated "meanings." This is obviously harder since you need to learn a musical vocabulary and be able to use it effectively. So, it's not about beautiful or not, none of that matters, to me it's basically either you write in a language people can read and interpret complexity, or you go into a variety of shades of compromise. In reality it's always a kind of compromise, but you can still play it extremely safe if you feel like it and just use very established idioms and be totally OK in that regard. Otherwise, if you write something that goes totally off the rails, it's fine, but it's a lot more direct as to what people can draw from it, often just simple emotional reactions save for the people who are also well versed in interpreting meaning out of otherwise random noise. And then it obviously isn't random noise anymore if you frame it within a structure, but that's pretty inconsequential all things considered. It goes without saying that this is all from the perspective of the would-be listener. I think it's OK to make that a focus too, but it's also OK to just do things for yourself and yourself alone. Sometimes seemingly "random noise" is just the thing you need to get out of an otherwise too-structured headspace that is bringing you nowhere. Just like you would switch painting styles to focus on different things, or sculpt different forms. It's not a black or white thing, but a sliding scale of priorities and values and you need to decide where you stand on it for each individual piece (or moment, even) when you write.
    1 point
  42. Hey everyone, this is my first post on the forum, and I thought I'd just ask your opinions of this semi-improv piece I wrote on my keyboard. Sorry if the recording quality (or my quality as a pianist) is lacking. I'm not really sure what genre this falls into either. But at any rate, hope you found the piece interesting. Piano improv.mp3
    1 point
  43. I've been busy these last two weeks and I have a few short pieces I'm working on. This piece I've called a German dance although I did set out to compose a minuet. I took a risk with the B section cadence of the first section because I used a pedal point in the low register which sounds a little muddy. I composed an alternative but I wondered what others might think. The trio is a bit generic I think, I really struggle with ideas for the trio sections. I will do a bit of research to better understand the balance between variety and unity of the minuet and its trio.
    1 point
  44. Im inspired by all three great classical composers; Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. They all composed German dances in their own styles. I particularly like Beethoven's dances. Schubert is king of the short form in my opinion though but im resisting his influence at the moment because my harmony knowledge is still growing and I want to assimilate the classical language first.
    1 point
  45. I appreciate your feedback. I think i will re-record the piece with a few changes I've made to the score. I know what you mean about repeat marks. It was the practice in the 18th century to vary the repeats and its a skill I want to learn to make my performance of my work more authentic to the period and more interesting.
    1 point
  46. Any feedback would be appreciated. I dont know whether the piece works.
    1 point
  47. Nice im very much liking the modern harmonies and the interplay between the instruments. I really like the 3rd movement!
    1 point
  48. I really enjoyed the work, I had a bit trouble relating to the second moment though, I found the dissonance and harmony too grating. Is this your aim? Two forces moving against each other? The other movement full of wit.
    1 point
  49. Very interesting piece sir, kept my on the edge of my seat the whole time. Very unique, bravo!
    1 point
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