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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/23/2022 in all areas

  1. I wrote this for school. Basically we were tasked to make an art piece about water (there’s a bit more to it, but that’s the jist). Sorry the performance is kind of sloppy. This will probably be in a suite where each piece involves water (I already have ideas for two others)
    3 points
  2. Hej, I would like to present my new composition. It was not so easy to find the pianist, who could play it. But I suceeded and found a very talented Anna, who played it exactly as I wanted. Maybe for some of you it will bring some peace or reminescence into the hearts. Kind wishes, Tomasz
    3 points
  3. For the last couple evenings I have invested most of my energy into finishing this fugue, which as shown below the title is coupled with an aphorism in Spanish, my native language: "Cuando cae el respeto a la muerte, decae la vida misma", which, leaving aside metaphorical extension, would roughly translate into English as "When respect to death is lost, so degenerates life." Even though said aphorism wasn't the main inspiration for this piece, I thought it was a nifty addition given the fatigue and withering emotions it was intended to wake on the listener. Since it is difficult for me to describe the nuances of this one as strictly "enjoyable", I guess the most appropriate closing expression for this one would perhaps be "feel existential" or something on those lines.
    3 points
  4. Here a etude I composed for my sons baptism on 17 April 2022. During the ceremony an organ version of that was played. Let me know your opinion.
    2 points
  5. So this invention was composed a day and a half ago, on Monday, some hours prior to a severe mental breakdown I had in Chamber Music class at the conservatory I attend because I hadn't taken my antedepressants and assorted medication for two days straight. And it begs the question, why would I have taken such an unnecesary risk over my own mental health? Well, the answer is plain basic sporadic forgetfulness. That's how stupid I actually am (uncomfortable though perhaps necessary detail: the anxiety actually led me to the hospital tied to a binding wheelchair). Anyways, in the meantime, while I strive for emotional recovery, have this invention as my latest work and possibly the last one for a while, due mostly to exams, stress, and some really rather unbeareable classmates I have had to bear the burden of being with the entire school day for seven months now.
    2 points
  6. Trio sonata in d major for two violins, cello and basso continuo. Written in the mid/late italian tradition. I found the time to write a little soanta. Playback uses Oboe sound for better sound quality. I. Grave 2. Allegro 3. Adagio 4. Vivace Please tell me what you think
    2 points
  7. I hope you guys would like this composition. What are you comments on it? Where could've I improved it? Also, I hope my use of the pedal was not excessive.
    2 points
  8. Hello Guys, This is my newest work, The Betrayal of Arkalla. This is also book music, like the previous. I think the choir becomes really epic. 🙂 What do you think?
    2 points
  9. Here are a couple of suggestions from a formerly decent but now out-of-practice clarinetist: 1. Swap out the B-flat clarinet and opt for the A. Your key signatures, mostly 3 and 4 sharps, will change to 2 and 1 flat. The cadenza section is in 1 sharp but with accidentals you're asking the B-flat player to play mostly A major and E minor arpeggios, which will change to B-flat major and F minor, and those aren't any more awkward. 2. In the cadenza and the section that follows you've got a number of extended fast passages with toungued articulations. This is very difficult; and even if you have a clarinetist who has mastered double-tonguing (harder on clarinet than most other instruments), it will probably never sound as clear as you're intending it to. It takes time to stop the airflow (which is what you're doing in double-tonguing half the time, not stopping the reed), re-start it, and re-establish the vibration of the reed and the air column. From a compositional standpoint, I like the overall feel of the piece, but to my ear the chord changes in bar 50-51 (Bm7-E-E7-A7) feel jarringly out of place. Like 2 bars of 1970s pop -- where did that come from?
    2 points
  10. This was basically an experiment to see how useful some choral samples might be for contemporary composition. They fell rather short on resources: more vowels and isolated consonants would have been useful. Even so, I decided to keep this piece, limited as it is, and perhaps use it as a launch for a larger work with full orchestra. I'd probably go over to the EW choir for something like that. The library came up as a bulk deal. I wanted the 7 soloists (they include a coloratura soprano) and the choir came with the bundle. About the score - I haven't tried to organise the percussion conventionally. It is scored. The work is unlikely to be performed live so it would be a wasted effort. The file dates are the final revisions. Any comment would be gratefully received. Many thanks if you can give it a listen.
    2 points
  11. Hello Guillem, This is a very good piece of music. I love your musical ideas. For me the style is a mix mid italian, late german and some rokokko/classical twists. Very interesting. You have a strong themes. I really love bar 41 - 45. The choir entry 44 is very german. My only critic is the following: - The modulation to man theme in minor could be smoother - You could have used more counterpoint and imitation with your themes. - Where is the text? 🙂 As i said, i really liked your theme. Very majestic. I think it fits "Cum Sanctu Spiritu". I could not help myself so I made a little tune of your theme, with text, and a bit more counterpoint and imitation! 🙂
    2 points
  12. I've been arranging The Nutcracker Suite for Piano Duet over the past several days and I've reached a dilemma in my arrangement. To 8va or not to 8va for Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy? I mean, with 8va, it does sound more like the celesta since it is an octave transposing instrument(the Celesta is), but it makes the already existing dynamic difference even more pronounced(which I made it piano dynamic in Piano Primo instead of the notated mf because I know the Celesta is quiet) and it's way up high towards the limit of the piano's range. Plus, I'm not sure I'll be able to get every note the Celesta plays in this movement if I use the 8va. And it's cumbersome to have to notate 8va in 2 staves for over 12 bars. I know I use the very low bass in this piece, like E1, but that's because I have to when the cellos and double basses are in octaves as they are a lot of the time(plus, octaves sound good and give that more orchestral sound to the piano). With this 8va, I don't have to do it, it's a question of whether I should or not. I'm leaning towards the no 8va option, but I want some input from others before I go any further with this. The PDF shows the no 8va option. The movement I'm asking about starts at Page 28 of the PDF.
    1 point
  13. yeah. Usually on harpsichord and i try it out on clavichord. I haven't written any non-keyboard pieces in a while but i used to. I actually clicked this thread thinking it was asking about, does this music you perform influence the music you play, to which my answer would be i try to deliberately pick what i play based on how i want to write
    1 point
  14. I like some complex rhythms here and there. A very effective piece.
    1 point
  15. Hello together, I recently got into composing and i want to present to you my latest Work, a piano Ballad in E Major. Here is the link to the performance: If you want me to Upload the score, Please Let me know in the comments
    1 point
  16. Hi. Currently listening to it and reading the score. It is indeed a very beautiful and brief piece, plus an human interpretation always sums. I noticed that there are several parts of the piece you play that aren't shown in its score, like the trills and flams and some passages in the left hand but since you said you ain't fluent in musescore I suppose I'm telling you nothing new so I'll not enter in details hehe. That said, all the adornments you use fit very good in my opinion and contribute to make your ballade brighter and more pleasant to listen to. Sometimes adornments can get some passages dirty or more ambiguous (and that might or might not be done on purpose) but this is definitely not the case. Hope you keep sharing your work here! Kind regards, Daniel–Ømicrón.
    1 point
  17. My math teacher (who is also the choir teacher and loves classical music) says the thing he’s most impressed at is how effectively I was able to convey a story with impressionism
    1 point
  18. Youre gonna change the world soon at this pace. Congratulations on such a moving work! Reminds me of Une Barque Sur L'Ocean but honestly I find this more interesting.
    1 point
  19. So I did a quick search for "film music" in the content titles only and surprisingly didn't find a thread for ppl's favorite film music tracks. So if you have (individual tracks - don't post the whole soundtrack LoL) favorite film music you'd like to share with the rest of your fellow Young Composer film enthusiasts, reply here! I'll start with this track from the original Jurassic Park movie - Dennis steals the embryo - music by John Williams. I love the quiet intensity of this track with its midi trombone that was probably state-of-the-art at the time! LoL
    1 point
  20. No it will not be. Not if I post often. I appreciate enough John Williams stuff of course, but I do not worship the man. I am well verse in all film music and am a damn huge fan of it all. Honestly, making posts in this thread that come from my true opinion wouldn't even lead to a 33% John Williams saturation level.
    1 point
  21. Thank you Peter! The words are not Hungarian. There's a choir Kontakt library called Cinesamples Voxos 2, the choir can sing only specified phrases so the librarie's abilities are very limited, but it's lifelike, so I really like it.
    1 point
  22. The Ballade in E-flat minor was written in 2021. Though it is written for solo piano, I had intended to write it for piano and orchestra, and may make a version of it for this ensemble in the future. The piece is about 8 minutes long. I hope you all enjoy it 🙂
    1 point
  23. Hi, what do you think about this work? It's the piano part playable? Thanks for the suggestions
    1 point
  24. My opinion is that if it sounds like this in MIDI, I would pay some bucks to see it in a live performance. I cannot resist baroque music, and in this case I do like this rondo's ritornello. I like the first "episode" a little bit more than the second and the third one. The structure is very clear as you stated in the post. Here's your like sir, thank you for sharing :B Kind regards ^^!
    1 point
  25. Many thanks for listening and your comments, Peter. In the absence of commenting on the click track I'm hoping it didn't pall too much! In a way it was a pleasant change writing just for unpitched percussion. It started with pastels on black Ingres paper! Not the first time sketches have started like that. Cheers.
    1 point
  26. This was titled "sleep music" in my orchestral folder - soothing after some of the abrasive stuff I worked on late last year. It's tonal, somnolent, much of it in half-light. Rendered on 25th April. It emerged with a couple of other pieces for strings (all muted except the solos) and small orchestra. I'm wondering if it holds together enough to be worth doing some final work on it. If you can please give it a listen, many thanks indeed, and any comments good or bad would be really appreciated. I had hopes for it but it might be just too boring and put people off to sleep. Bests, Quinn.
    1 point
  27. Thanks so much for listening! I think adding timpani is a great idea: will definitely try that! I agree the clarinet is jarring, especially when it first comes in. It sounds clumsy and too much in your face. I've tried taking down the velocity; but it doesn't help. Probably need to use a better instrument library. I could certainly make the woodwind more legato; though I think I already tried that, and didn't like the result. The second theme is in tenor trombone, accompanied by horns. The sudden removal of the church organ was designed to create a dialogue between instruments, as you correctly guessed. Maybe it didn't work so well. Could certainly try adding more organ underneath the chorus. The tubular bells are supposed to represent ship's bells, or the bells attached to buoys bobbing up and down on the ocean. The lack of rhythmic variety has been mentioned to me before: so I agree that's something I need to work on! Have created all my music so far with Music Studio for iPad (developed by Alexander Gross). I find it really easy and intuitive to use. Some of the virtual instruments are from the Sonatina Symphonic Orchestra library. Am trying to learn Reaper; but I find all the technical stuff about ports and channel routing quite hard to grasp. Also downloaded VSL at the weekend; but have not been able to wrap my tiny brain around it! It looks like it can be used a stand-alone music production suite: so I'm not sure why I would want to load it as a plugin through Reaper? That seems to add an extra layer of complexity, and would probably be more draining on my CPU.
    1 point
  28. I began this discord server focused on Early Music (for simplicity's sake, we could say before 1750 though this is something that is hotly debated on the server), and it is both active and serves as a good place for information and discussion pertaining to its focus. It also has a section for people to post their compositions and performances, music they just happen to be listening to, scholarly things they're working on, instruments they've acquired or constructed, or even things not pertaining to Early Music particularly. So in short, it's a place to facilitate community and exchange for musicians, performers, instrument builders, composers, theorists, and music lovers who want to explore Early Music (or dispense their own pearls of wisdom)........if you're interested, here's the link: https://discord.gg/myuSdpXF
    1 point
  29. Just wanted to share this simple piece I wrote for piano. I don't know if it's any good; but thought I'd post it anyway. The influences are Sondheim and Chopin, with a bit of Bach thrown in for good measure!
    1 point
  30. Thank you, Peter! Your comments are always spot on and encouraging. I appreciate it! Especially the point about breathing. I can tell (better after your observation) that there often is a lack of "punctuation" in what I write. Also, I remember your reservations about slow movements and I was very proud that you didn't dislike a slow bassoon movement I posted some time ago 🙂 I see your points about uniformity, and I'll keep them in mind for next time. Thanks again!
    1 point
  31. Hi, here's the complete sonata of which I posted the first movement a few months ago... I would be very grateful for your feedback!
    1 point
  32. Thank you for your compliments. Happy you could feel the joy I meant it to be. I could look if/when other meters are needed. Have you heard of 'fuzzy logic'? It determines input somewhere between 'completely true' and 'completely false', between 0 and 1. I like the idea since we humans see often so dimly, so vague, so imperfect. If art is a testimony of life it sure should express this fuzzy side of life too. We like so much to have complete clarity and for sure nothing is wrong with clarity. But our clarity is surrounded by uncertainty. Anyway I should stop here, I'm no internet guru today. But I guess if there is meaning to such piece, besides the fun of writing (primarely that), this is the point. Thanks for your comment! 🙂
    1 point
  33. Pleasant little piece. A bit out of my musical range bordering on the Haydnesque or somewhere between the Elizabethan era and Haydn. Were this the turn of the 20th Century it would be the music I'd expect to hear on the lawn of a summer evening at a posh soirée - but it would equally do at a wedding reception where something more sophisticated than pop has been requested! Easy to listen to. And I'm glad to think here are other composers who prefer to work drunk! .
    1 point
  34. This is a wonderful piece. The opening reminds me quite a bit of Mahler, and his influence is distinct in many of the thematic and orchestration choices you made. I think overall it has an incredible amount of structural cohesion, lent to it by your obvious skill with developing thematic material. This is something to be proud of, and is worthy of live performance in every aspect.
    1 point
  35. Yeah, I should've decrease the reverb and lower the piano a bit. Although it does give that distant feeling, the sounds do get muddied in the faster passages. Glad you got that nostalgic feeling out of it. Thanks for the feedback!
    1 point
  36. Great piece! The clarinet part sounds a bit muddy and distant and echoey to me though. The piano sounds clear and in the foreground. As for the music itself, your treatment of thirds in the beginning and when that idea returns throughout the piece reminds me somewhat of a piece I happened to hear in Jr. College for two pianos by Rachmaninoff. You do however bring your own individual spin on it with a unique rhythmic identity. I love the extended clarinet cadenza - like I mentioned though, to me it sounds like there's too much reverb. But if you're happy with it, no need to change it at this point since you've expressed that you want to move on to other projects. I do get a very nostalgic feeling when listening to this work which I think you said was your intent. Well done!
    1 point
  37. Pertinent to this topic, I happened to pick up one of AngelCityOutlaw's comments on a different topic (Elitism in music, about which I choose to read only a limited number of posts and didn't watch a video apparently embedded in the root post). I think he has much relevant to say. "The growing majority of people who come out of music education today wind up writing inane, abstract conceptualism like he did because this is praised by the professors. Maybe not always literal serialism, but abstract conceptualism all the same. It's the exact same, and actually worse, in the visual arts. Look at how fast JJayBerthume's music went to hell after he graduated. He was a better composer when he was 16 and self-taught!" Seems to echo my thoughts about college and "degrees in composition." Edit: There's a possible case for an artist to produce work just for their personal consumption - those, maybe, who enjoy the process as much as or more than the result but with no intention of revealing anything to anyone else. But much is about attempting to communicate something to others. There are kind of 'sense data' rules about communication, aside from it being a science anyway involving semiotics and information theory, however loosely. One rule is that for a communication to succeed there must be enough common language between transmitter and receiver. Neurophysiology enters the equation too. Much contemporary music falls flat because that common link isn't there. Gets more complex when there are 'receivers' able just to listen without comprehension but stimulated to some kind of acceptable experience. I haven't a clue what they're saying to each other but the blackbird song on a warm May evening I find most pleasurable. Some listeners perhaps are happy at that, the sound of traffic or a building site are as edifying as a piece of serial music. '
    1 point
  38. Hi, I enjoyed the mood very much; I wonder if you incorporated some contrasting/conflicting musical lines against the main theme - would it enhance the feelings of conflict and dread? At the moment the sparseness of the orchestration creates an image in my mind of the"no man's land" - desolate wasted fields of world war 1. Mark
    1 point
  39. The augmented second theme you used is effective in the sense that it never resolves, resembling never-ending qualities. To me, the quality is more like eerieness, doubt and scare, instead of any from of tradegy or anger. I particularly like your addition of cymbal and vibraphone, which adds white noise to the piece, giving a sense of "I don't know what to expect". The muted strings are well-chosen in this theme. Nice touch. Could be a nice music in cinametic settings.
    1 point
  40. I think the aspect that works best here is the juxtaposition of the 12-tone and diatonic ideas, although it feels like the diatonicism takes over pretty early and doesn't look back. There's a Bartok-like character (I'm hearing echoes of the Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta) in the middle parts that's appealing to my ears, but of course I don't know if that's the voice you were going for. The opening and the ending don't work so well for me, mostly because I'm not hearing the material there reflected elsewhere in the piece. They seem to stand on their own but not say much. The last bar is kind of the harmonic antithesis of the first bar, but it's not clear why.
    1 point
  41. Hello, this is a piece for solo piano I composed last summer, titled Berceuse. It's being played by Gamma1734 on youtube. I'd be happy to know what you think 🙂 François
    1 point
  42. Greetings everybody here! The following is another piece of work in the same set as the previous work: Miroirs et Fleur et de Lune. This work is entitled as Jeux, trying to picture a game of light and dark, switching from dissonance to finally a pentatonic scale, a joy atmosphere at D major. This work is finished in a rush, so... there might be a lot of flaws lol, so please comment on my work to help it become better 😀 Imago_III_V_Jeux.mp3
    1 point
  43. I'm flattered that you think so. Are you going to enter Ryan Leach's composing competition on YouTube? Also, I liked your score. Great touch adding bit of that menacing brass at the very end. Most people I've seen score this just leave it all happy sounding there.
    1 point
  44. Pretty great piece. The recording and video itself is awesome as well. I had no idea those instruments could blend so well?
    1 point
  45. I just gave your piece a listen and read along. A short summary: M. 7: This cadence does not really work. The i7sus4 is neither suspenseful nor consonant, just jarring. This is exacerbated through your bass movement, jumping from the minor seventh between g# and f# into a perfect eleventh. No style I know would use this movement to end a section. MM. 9 ff.: Weird chromatic movement, ending abruptly again MM. 13 ff.: s. above MM. 17: An almost pleasant Cmaj7 on the second beat MM. 21: Almost climactical, but Emin6 - G#minadd9 crashes it yet again MM. 23 ff.: Off to an interesting start(nice rising figure topped with an apoggiatura), only to go wrong again MM. 26 - 49(fin): This does not work at all Now, not to leave without proper constructive criticism, I might add: I skimmed through other works of yours. In your Fantasy for Violin and Piano, you mostly manage to deliver a coherent(although very diatonic experience), leaving odd jumps aside for a second. Your Concerto Sketch does this even better, despite being just a sketch. The beginning up to M. 7 works quite well. MM. 12-21 are also fine. Elsewhere, however, it is really disjointed. Especially the second half is just odd, the ending coming out of nowhere. What I think you fail at is subverting expectations: Instead, you introduce nice ideas and then go off the rails, leaving the listener behind. Maybe you should try your hands at a smaller, simpler form. This piece does neither work as a sketch nor a fully-fledged work.
    1 point
  46. Marylyn here, the "real" owner of the account LOL. I looked at the score with your introduction explaining the special effects. If you don't mind me saying so, I hope not, I think these would be difficult to render unless your note player can do them but even so, they appear to detract from the piece. Modern or contemporary doesn't have to depend on unusual effects unless you really want them. They're probly too extreme for this experiment and would be great if the entire piece was written in a contemporary vein. The blend would be smoother with only standard playing techniques : naturale (obviously), sul pont, sul tasto, pizz, gliss, portamento (all muted and not) and col legno and harmonics natural and otherwise. Just a thought or two. An ambitious piece and the tonal aspects tell that you know what you're doing!
    1 point
  47. Wow! Its a really nice and beautiful piece! Well done! I wouldn't call it a symphony, I would call it a symphonic poem. One thing, it's kinda stuck in one place. Maybe its the dynamics and automation but I think its more about the felling, which is kind of the same - which makes this piece "not by itself"
    1 point
  48. @PaperComposer thank you for your insightful comment! I see what you mean. I don't intend to go back and add a development section because it "should" have one. This structure was my plan from the start. Since the Recap is mostly the same as the Exposition I wondered if the piece might come off as a little repetitive, but it sounds like it was still enjoyable (at least to you). The reason I omitted it in my original plan was this is the first piece I wrote of this magnitude, so I didn't want to overwhelm myself. Thank you! You know, you're the second person to say that section reminded them of Brahms. While I respect Brahms and everything he accomplished, I've never really been able to get into his music. I've tried on several occasions, and while I didn't dislike it, I never found anything that really grabbed me, you know what I mean? Do you know of any specific passages of his you would compare this section to? That might help me find a spark in his music. Thank you! I think I'm happy with the string writing itself, what I meant was that I don't know as much as I should about bowing and other technical aspects of string instruments. In the score I mostly just notated what "felt" right, but I'm not sure if the bowings I put in there make sense or are feasible. I guess if a string player didn't like what I wrote, they would just change to whatever they like, but I would like to give them at least a decent starting point. And, I'm a (former) horn player too! 🙂 Hopefully my bias isn't too obvious in my writing lol. I agree. With this piece I was experimenting with a more extended introduction, rather than a short one that leads right into the exposition. My goal was to write an introduction with standalone ideas from which I derive the themes I used later in the piece. For example, the opening motive in the oboe and clarinet below (m.3): was transformed by retrograde inversion to build the first theme of the Exposition in the clarinet (m.99): In this way, the introduction provides the material from which the rest of the piece grows, while still having it's own independent identity. Thank you! I wanted a very dramatic contrast here, I'm glad it was effective. Good point, I'm not as educated on these type of nuances with woodwind playing as I should be. It would make sense to have the 3rd flute double alto flute to play this. I hope you're not too offended if I don't do this immediately, as it would take some time to work this into the score, and at the moment I would like to concentrate on other projects. But I will certainly incorporate this idea going forward. Thank you for listening! I am very close with finishing another piece of this scope (this one with a proper, and intentional development). Hopefully I can have it finished within the next month or so.
    1 point
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