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  1. I just completed a piece for clarinet and piano. I would be very interested in getting your comments. There is probably still a need for some revision (spelling issues, slurring etc.). I am particularly interested to know about the potential playability of this piece. I am looking forward to your feedback!
    4 points
  2. I use here my "knowledge" about schemata and other resources I am learning (musical rhetorics). This is not a baroque o or exactly galant style. It's music inspired in it and using its stuff. The first part is a Fanfare in format AABBA (binary). The second takes the form of a ritornello. There's no third part, I don't want to write it.
    4 points
  3. Hey guys! I've been working on this piece for the past few weeks. It ended up sounding a bit more sad than I imagined it. I originally intended it to be for Brass Trio (Trumpet, French Horn, and Euphonium or Trombone) but Musescore's Trumpet wouldn't perform anything above a high concert D (or something). I was under the impression that virtuoso trumpet players should be able to play a high concert Eb especially if its approached by stepwise motion. So I switched the instrumentation to Flute, Clarinet, and Bassoon (again) but because of the way I wrote it, it should be possible to perform it with brass instead. The variations in this piece are all subtitled and I tried to follow a kind of rondo form with them: I - Fanfare, II - Minuet, III - March, IV - Waltz, V - Fanfare 2, VI - Minuet 2, VII - Scherzo, VIII - Siciliana, IX - Fugue, X - Lilt. The fanfares would be more fanfare-like if performed by brass (of course). I'm actually not sure if I'm completely done with this theme. I didn't even make use of any inversions, retrogrades or retrograde inversions of the theme in any of my variations. But I felt like the piece was already getting too long so I ended it here. But it would be easy to continue it later on with more variations just starting where I left off. I'd appreciate any of your constructive comments, observations or critiques! Thanks for listening.
    3 points
  4. Got commissioned by a grad student at my uni for a piece on their terminal recital. Feedback is always appreciated.
    3 points
  5. If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy drinks, frequency of bathroom breaks and risset beats. -Nicolas Cage
    3 points
  6. Starting January, 28th, 2023 and running until March, 26th, 2023 Young Composers Forum invites you to participate in another new and unique music composition competition hosted by @Tónskáld, @PeterthePapercomPoser, @Thatguy v2.0, @Omicronrg9, @Henry Ng Tsz Kiu, and @chopin, all of whom will also judge the competition. In this competition you are given a choice of orchestrating, arranging, re-harmonizing, quoting or writing variations on one of 5 given 8-bit music tracks from old video games which you must listen to in order to extract the musical material relevant to you. The entries will be judged on a scale of 0 - 8 in 8 relevant categories: Melodies/ Themes/ Motives Harmony/ Chords/ Textures Form/ Development/ Structure Originality/ Creativity Score/ Presentation Instrumentation/ Orchestration Execution of Given Challenge Taste Pick your favorite 8-bit track and transform it in as many ways as you see fit! Make it into a fully fledged composition according to your skills and strengths! Please note that the judges will give you more points the more elements of your composition are original and not simply copied from the relevant 8-bit track. However, the judges should be able to recognize at some point that your composition is derived in some way from the relevant 8-bit track. Feel free to highlight for the listener where in your score you used the relevant 8-bit tracks' theme by showing them in the pdf, mentioning measure numbers, or giving them timestamps from your mp3. Also, there will be a cash prize of $100 given to the winner of this competition! Given enough participants (at least 10), there will also be a cash prize for 2nd and 3rd place ($60 and $40 respectively). In order to compete: Your composition must not exceed 10 minutes of music Your composition must include an element of the one relevant 8-bit track of your choosing Any instrumentation or choice of ensemble is allowed No age limit One submission per participant Mp3 submission and score/sheet music pdf required $100 1st prize, $60 2nd prize, and $40 3rd prize Deadline: March, 26th, 2023 Submissions are to be sent to @PeterthePapercomPoser through direct message with the title of the composition as the subject line. He will post the submissions anonymously in a special contest thread for everyone to listen to and consider. Besides attaching a pdf score (without your name in it) and mp3 rendition of your music consider also including a description of your piece for the judges, fellow competitors and young composers at large to better understand your music. Which 8-bit track did you choose to transform "From Bits to Bangers"? Current Entrants: (reply to this thread in order to enter) @sswave @Left Unexplained @WowBroThatWasReallyEdgy @Ferrum @Setthavat @Nico Fantasy Choose which of these tracks you would like to transform "From Bits to Bangers" using any means available at your disposal: (for best results please listen on your computer rather than a phone) If the mp3 player below doesn't work for some reason you can find the 5 8-bit tracks here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VLI_vrvvpFVUxlXAB3ltUcsseC2k6uzz?usp=sharing
    2 points
  7. This was the first large work I wrote and does not reflect my current abilities. I started writing it in September 2019 and finished in January 2021. I'm posting it here because I'd like to make a revised and fully orchestrated version in the future and need some feedback for that. The piece is programmatic with 7 movements, an introduction, and a finale. I will share the intended the program in case there are better ways of depicting them. The introduction serves no programmatic purpose, but does introduce the most important motif, the four descending notes. The first movement is the Prophesy of Simeon and for its structure I state material and then stick that into a slower section in an attempt to imitate questions and wise answers. After the final answer is a musical "pierce" since Simeon says that Mary's heart will be pierced by a sword of sorrow. The movement closes sadly, foreshadowing the fifth movement. The second movement is the Flight into Egypt. In the story, an angel warns Joseph of King Herod's intent to kill Jesus, so they flee through the harsh desert to Egypt. The music reflects that with a slow beginning and then an agitated theme in a mode. Then, for when they arrive and live peacefully in Egypt, there is a calm hymn-like theme. A fugue transitions to repeat the angel section from the beginning, as an Angel tells them they are to return since Herod is dead. The agitated desert theme resumes and when they make it back, a very important theme plays, closing the second movement. The third movement is the Loss of the Child Jesus in the Temple. The movement begins calmly with the theme that ended the previous movement, as in the program, Mary and Joseph are walking home without the knowledge of Jesus being left behind. The structure of the rest of the movement is a series of 3 marches for the 3 days they spent look for Jesus. The movement closes with the hymn-like theme. The fourth movement is Mary's Meeting Jesus on the Via Dolorosa. This is the movement I dislike the most. The idea was for it to be in kind of an arch form, for I imagined Mary in the crowd watching Jesus come into view, walk past, and then leave her view. I don't think it worked particularly well, especially with how repetitively I use the main theme. The fifth movement is the Crucifixion. I begin it slowly with three points of the "pierce" chord from the first movement, for the three nails attaching him to the cross. Immediately after the third nail is a dissonant variation of the theme from the fourth movement. Then, a mediocre fugue on that same theme, which leads into a slowed down repeat of the end of the first movement with more voices, for the death of Jesus. The sixth movement is the Piercing of Christ's Side and His Descent from the Cross. The music starts quiet and relatively still. Then a spear is thrown, so to reflect that, I have flying-ish music. The "pierce" chord plays again but is transformed into consonance with waterfall-like arpeggios, for when the spear pierces his side and blood and water spill out. Then the hymn-like theme plays. To close, the quiet music repeats, but slowly descends, for Jesus being taken down. The seventh movement is the Burial of Jesus, and is in ABA form, imitating funeral marches. Afterward, is the Finale. I have 2 unresolved suspended chords, and then 1 resolved for Jesus returning on the third day. Then, after the greatest build-up I've ever written, the theme which ended the second movement returns, closing the piece. Welp, that's the whole piece. Again, it does not reflect my current style, and I don't think it as particularly good, though I am still proud of it. Feedback is welcome, of course.
    2 points
  8. So as @Henry Ng Tsz Kiu and @Thatguy v2.0 had asked about before, I decided to sort of try getting back into doing music for more stuff. I started with compiling some of the Castlevania inspired tunes I did over the last two years, remixing and editing some of them into loops and now it just went up on the GameDevMarket (Unreal and Unity stores soon to follow). We'll see how it does. Anyway, thanks for your support guys. I have some packages of 20th-Century Style adventure movie music and 80s stuff in the works too, of course, some tracks are just standalone pieces and I'll be sure to post them on the forums like always.
    2 points
  9. Hi everyone, I began a string quartet between the 2nd and final movement of my piano concerto to take my mind out of it. This is the first time i compose seriously for string quartet and would like to know your thoughts... There is only the exposition of the first movement
    2 points
  10. Hi The crab canon (cancrizans in Latin, cangrejo in Spanish) is know (wiipedia) as well as "retrograde canon, canon per recte et retro or canon per rectus et inversus)... is an arrangement of two musical lines that are complementary and backward. If the two lines were placed next to each other (as opposed to stacked), the lines would form something conceptually similar to a pallindrome. The name 'crab' refers to the fact that crabs are known to walk backward (although they can also walk forward and sideways). The most famous crab canon is the one Bach wrote for the Musical Offering. There are no many canon of this type, because it is more an exercise. It has its difficulty. The crab canon harmonizes one melodic line with itself in retrograde. So, you have to write a double (invertible) counterpoint, taking care of the fifth interval, because once inverted it becomes a dissonant fourth. So, fifths should be treated as dissonances. I have written, with time, some crab canon, just for fun and as a counterpoint exercise. But I had a concern with the possibility of writing a double crab canon. That is to say: two crab canon which can sound together. I have not seen any methods to to this. But I developed my own. I wrote a simple cancrizans 6 + 6 measures. Afterwards I wrote. second one in a lower register, having in mind the first. Third, I put both canon together. Fourth, I wrote the result with all the lines in retrograde. I think more combinations are possible, but taking care of the intervals. At least, it was fun. I'll keep this piece... Perhaps I use it in a larger format as a part of an orchestral work.
    2 points
  11. @jawoodruff Thanks SO much! Clearly, to say the least, I'm not a violinist. I can easily eliminate the double stops in the orchestral version by distributing them between the primi and secondi. I'll think of a different solution for the violin and piano. Thanks for the notes about bowing and accents. I'll try and find a violinist friend to help me understand better with concrete examples, but in the meantime I'll just us my imagination and re-bow. Looking forward to writing a new version of this sonata with all the invaluable input of @PeterthePapercomPoser, @Henry Ng Tsz Kiu and yours! Thanks!
    2 points
  12. Hey there Peter By now, I've heard so much of your music that I could probably pick it out of the bunch if it were in a pool of composers here. You have a distinct style, and an even more uniquely-you harmony that I'm always happy to hear when digging around in the YC forums. You have a sense of charm and wonder to your musical voice, something that always keeps me engaged and always wanting to hear more of your music. I love the classical/VGM hybrid style yours has. My immediate thought upon hearing this piece is that it would be really cool in a video game, even more so with an RPG element that I know you love so much. Whenever you create your own game, it'd be cool if you took this line of thought with it. Having a central theme within the game, but sporadically sprinkling variations throughout the progress or current situation the main character or characters are in. You definitely know your styles of music, as this piece was littered with the traces of your influences and studies. Multiple presentations were given throughout of your theme, most of the time with interesting dances and forms that you've learned through your years of studies and composing. It was cool to hear the theme played in so many fun and wonderful ways, you definitely are a connoisseur of the theme and variations genre. Ok, enough patting you on the back. Yes, you're a fantastic composer, and your knowledge shines in this piece as you took us on your audio journey. But let's get into the real criticisms, shall we? 😄 So first of all, the mixing you did was much better then the latest piano piece you posted. I heard virtually no clipping, so kudos on that. There were however multiple spots where there was a weird pop, or something. It could possibly be MS4's sound samples just being buggy, but they stood out to me. I noted a few, maybe there are others, but you might see what I mean (1:20, 2:06, 2:49, 3:19, 6:09, 6:46, 6:59, 9:17). Most were just minor, but I wanted you to know in case there was anything that could be done about them. Again, it wasn't a major thing, but they stood out to my ears. If it is a mixing issue, I'm curious how this is handled on Musescore. Did you import the mp3 to a DAW and raise the volume, or is this straight from MS itself? It could be the samples, but eh I don't know. Just know this wasn't anything major, but something to look out for going forward. As far as the music itself, there were two major issues I had as a fellow composer. One is something I tell you all the time, and you know, this is actually the last time I'm ever going to mention it. I'm honestly tired of saying it, and maybe it's just that we're different people with different tastes, but I'm not going to say this again. You like what you like, and I like what I like. But your texture all the way throughout has a very samey sound to it partly because you have every instrument playing nearly all the time. Don't you ever just want a solo phrase, or a duet? Or if all 3 are playing, maybe 2 instruments are playing a sparse staccato hit point type of accompaniment while your melody sings? I won't hammer this one too hard, but it's something I always hear with your music. If you like it like that, then fine. It's your music. But imo I think it could greatly benefit with drastic changes of texture. I've thought about the video game aspect of your music, and yes, some of that music has this same kind of thick textural vibe to it a lot of the time. But not all of it. And I'm not playing a game when listening to your piece (unless that's the intent?). So...in forever conclusion to this point, that's how I feel about it lol. Another reason it had a samey sound is that nearly all of the time the flute is the melody, the clarinet plays a counter melody, and the bassoon is the accompaniment. Not always, but I started to just look for the flute starting each variation with a Bb or C after a while. If you like it like that, that's fine, but think about it's register. Sure, you mentioned this was supposed to be for a brass trio, but I don't think the two ensembles are necessarily equivalent as far as high, medium, and low "sounds". If your intent is that it could be played by both brass and wind groups, sure that's ok, but the two to me are vastly different. When you made the decision to write for the winds, I really would have considered the flute's upper register, as well as the registers of the other winds that you used. Ok, maybe you start a lot of variation melodies on Bb or C, but why the same one? As you know, flutes have a range that loves those leger lines, take advantage of it! You could have easily bumped the flute part up an octave on several variations and this might have given the textural variation needed to my ears. Why have the flute so dominant with the melody? It would have been really cool to have the flute and clarinet playing some ethereal harmony while the Bassoon got to take the lead with the melody, or maybe having a fun but somber chalumeau clarinet melody while you could get creative with how the bassoon and flute played together. My impression is that you were disappointed that MS4 didn't play your brass parts as intended, so you settled with the winds without fully giving time to think about how the winds might handle your material differently. But to me, there were lots of opportunities to really explore deep with wind textures with any of your variations that weren't taken full advantage of. My only other constructive critique would be the actual form itself. I loved the idea of a form within a form, having a theme and variations molded into a rondo. I was maybe just hoping for more in that regard. It didn't feel like distinctive sections of a rondo to me, but merely just a good ol' fashioned and well written theme and variations. A thought I had to possibly pursue in the future is if you are to do this type of thing again, maybe have the theme and variations that are a part of the "A" section have transitions to each other, where it sounds like one continuous part. And when you finally move to the "B" section, have there be a cadential close like you ended each of your variations with. That way it would be easier to discern the rondo sections, without it being merely what key it's in, or whatever. Maybe having different tempos for the sections of the rondo as well? I don't know, just brainstorming here. Those were my biggest gripes, but I don't want to understate how much I enjoyed this one. I think one of it's strengths was how you employed creative and differing harmonies throughout the whole piece. The minuets were my favorite moments, I loved the darker bassoon lines underneath the other two instruments. I also really enjoyed the Lilt section. I'm not too sure what that form is, but I liked your trademark wonky odd meters used. You develop the theme very well, as always. I loved hearing how you continued to evolve each little moment of the theme as your piece progressed, you do a fantastic job at that. Especially the little descending moment at the end of each variation, I could tell you took great care in your craftsmanship as the music never got boring or stale. The ten or so minutes compiling the duration seemed to fly by, I couldn't believe it was over when it ended! I enjoyed the accelerando at the end too. The ending may not have been completely definitive to me, but I knew it was coming when you sped the music up. Possibly it was your harmoniously dissonant style in general that made me think that, but awesome ending, nonetheless. Overall, I think the musescore file sounded wonderful, a definite step up from the previous version. I'm not sure about all the instruments, but these three sounded vibrant and colorful all throughout. I prefer winds over brass, so although you may not be completely satisfied with the end result because you envisioned brass, I enjoyed this piece the dozen or so times I've listened to it now. Every once in a while I slip into the forums incognito and not on my profile, pilfering around stealthily to see what's happening around here. And more often than not, I'm checking out people's music that I've already heard before, and plenty of times it's your music I listen to, not to find some other thing to mention, but to just listen to out of enjoyment. Thanks for sharing my friend, your music can be complicated yet orderly, dissonant yet smooth, and sometimes bears features that make me comment critically, yet always finding enjoyable.
    2 points
  13. This is my second fantasy for Orchestra. I'm going to give a bit more -just due to the fact I'm planning on sending this to a local orchestra. My inspiration for using the fantasy form comes from Mozart's fantasies for piano. I loved the way Mozart took the improvisatory technique and used it compositionally -where each section is based off material from the previous section. I tried looking for Britten's Phantasie on Youtube -but sadly, couldn't find a good one with score to analyze prior to writing this (but I heard his work did the same thing?) Anyways, I also wanted to go off the idea of a 'dream-like' opening as I did in my first fantasy (which I'm reorchestrating and recomposing sections of). This one opens and ends in a similar fashion. However, I've applied more of what I've learned orchestrating and have more extensive brass parts and a timpani part written out. That said, I'm probably going to redo the ending of this one to make it more final. I'm probably going to compose more of these types of orchestral works. I really enjoyed writing this and love the result of it. Hope you all enjoy!
    2 points
  14. Hi all. This was my first attempt at using loops in GarageBand. The sax is made from standard Apple loops, and the percussion is automated: so the only thing that's actually me is the piano! Feels like cheating really. Not sure it's a good way to make music.
    2 points
  15. Hi again Jason, nice to check you just uploaded another piece. But less protocol and more going straight to the point: • A very peaceful and fascinating beginning. Instruments appear and disappear without troubling or getting in the way of the flow of this piece. When I happen to review a piece and comment something regarding the lack of dynamics, I believe this would be a perfect example of how to make good use of them, damn! • The "fantasy" title is completely fitting in my opinion. I am reaching 5:00 and I didn't even realize. You got me immersed. I hope the local orchestra you're sending this to play it soon. • I agree with you regarding the ending of the piece, it's probably the most improvable thing at first sight, but it's not even bad in its current state in my opinion. Looking forward to check your next fantasies or works of a similar kind! Kind regards, Daniel–Ømicrón.
    2 points
  16. hello everyone, this is my new piece, hope you like it! the video: 【微分音钢琴】作品5之7 无标题_哔哩哔哩_bilibili
    2 points
  17. Well, a couple of things come to mind when I hear these. For one, I feel like you don't have enough material "mapped out". For instance, do you know all of the themes you'll be using? Or the chord progression? With a lot of the multi-instrumental music I write, I generally have an idea of where I want to go because I know I'm trying to go from say an A theme to a B theme. Then the fun part is discovering how you'll get there. It also helps to figure out a rough idea of what form you're going for too. Even if it's some kind of improvisational fantasy type thing, knowing your main sections will help you. The piano helps me as well. Even though I'm a guitarist, playing piano and tinkering with ideas on it is vital to my process, as I'm at least able to play block chords with a melody to get a sense of the mold I'm shaping the music from. As far as your music is concerned, I'm surprised you got stuck. The first movement was flowing nicely, and when the strings and percussion came in you played your main theme, but then it sort of trailed off. I'd continue to develop that theme, using all the basic techniques (expansion, compression, yada yada). Really toy around with the material of your theme before thinking of new ideas. That's one of the hard parts of writing for orchestra; if you don't know how to really milk your material and squeeze every last ounce out of it, it's easy to get lost in playing around with orchestral color, just tossing the same ideas to other instruments and calling it a day. The second piece was a bit harder for me to grasp, as it seemed like it belongs in the middle of your piece somewhere. If I were you, I would focus on the first one, really make a note of the material you're trying to develop, work out some chords that sound good to you as possibly a harmonic theme, and go from there. You could even continue writing this out as a piano reduction, and once you're ready, you get to have loads of fun orchestrating it. One of my favorite things on YC is to hear an incomplete work become polished and finished. I'm excited to hear how you develop this piece, keep us all updated with your progress!
    2 points
  18. Hello Guys, Here's my brand new track:
    2 points
  19. So people have complained about the clacking on the clavichord and it's something that I will deal with in time but for now this is what I have. I wrote this over the summer and it's my first truly multi-movement (as opposed to just multi-sectional) work. It might be inspired as much by the virginalists as by Couperin, D'anglebert, etc. Anyways I hope you like it but either way you are free to criticize/ comment and so forth.
    2 points
  20. Yes, I encourage to take a look to those "old" techniques. My YT channel is an auxiliary tool, in fact. I upload the scores and the music but the explanations are in my blog. Unfortunately, the blog is very big now and impossible to translate everything into English. I'm working on a new project. It is about rhetoric figures in music. They were so importante in the baroque era and later. I am writing short examples examples for these figures to make my own catalog. I am thinking how to publish it (in the same blog perhaps).
    2 points
  21. Hi again, Gwendolyn. Depends, if these are just sketches, that is, they are going to be extended and not only complemented with a third work, there should be no problem building tension as long as you know what prominence you want it to have. In the full orchestral piece you could alternate periods of tension with periods of relative "comfort" but increasing the tension in each "cycle". Something like this: Some more details and opinions: • The first ~15 seconds on the second part do a good job as an "opening" theme, they sound expansive to me. • After listening a couple of times, I do not really think building tension too quickly be the problem if there's any. Do you want to build a theme based on a continuous flow of tension? Do you want rests, balance? Having the structure clear is key in this case (and very often I'd say, it always helps). Do you conceive this as a single movement work? In other words, no long rests and/or thematic splitting? Do you think there's something else that —apart from the general "mood" both pieces may transmit and the, likely, tonality sharing since both pieces go to F right after the beginning or in the very beginning— Is there any further specific connection between these works? Too many questions perhaps? • Despite agreeing with ma buddy here @Henry Ng Tsz Kiu on the thicker texture of the Fantasy two, I consider the first one texture more elaborate and potentially better, as well as more emotionally charged. However, this is likely a consequence from my said judgement and preference of the 1st over the 2nd. As always, thank you for sharing. Kind regards, Daniel–Ømicrón.
    2 points
  22. Hi. First of all don't take my words literally, of course, do what you want. As far as I know, in 4 part writing, or generally speaking, since tonality became common, the fourth is a consonance if it is in the upper part of chord, that is, in first inversion (E - G - C). But when the fourth involves the bass, it is a dissonance. The 4th was used as the normal interval (together with the 5th) in times before the Renaissance (when the 3rd and the 6th were considered dissonances). On the other hand, Fauxbourdon, Faburden and Falsobordone are different harmonization and improvisatory techniques developed in the final part of the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance. They are techniques that harmonize a cantus firmus in three or four voices. Fauxbourdon has its origin in Bourgogne (France), Faburden in England, and Falsobordone in Italy. In these techniques the upper voice was strictly harmonized in the interval of 4th by the middle voice. These devices were used much more later, here you have an example of Fauxbourdon in the Impromptu Op. 29 by Chopin. As you can see, it is a sequence of chords in first inversion. Notice how in every of them the bass forms a third with the middle voice, and the middle a fourth with the upper voice . In your piece, some fourths involving the bass are in passing spots, or they seem prepared. But other ones are in strong places. As I said, you can do what you want. In my opinion, the fourths in this situation provides an "ancient" sound, and it is a bit incongruent with the piece following the tonal rules we all know.
    2 points
  23. Yes, important to recognise the linguistic properties of music - well, any sound really, linguistic being more appropriately applied to music than the many aural stimuli that assail us day and sometimes night, which nonetheless usually have some meaning. (It's about meaning which places it in the realm of semiotics.) But I can't agree that because atonal composers use the same 12 notes - in some ways the 'letters' of the alphabet, that they conform to a language - and certainly not the same language as the tonalists. Rather more comes into the tonal language - phrasing, the syntax, progression, intervals, rhythmic construction, dynamics, harmonic rhythm, selective repetition, all of which have been wired into our "minds" for a long time... which doesn't mean every event has to conform. Surprises - events outside the expected - are sometimes delightful, sometimes not. But it comes down to familiarity and expectation. Which comes down to communication and information theory. When I listen to a "verbal" programme I'd tune into one in English. I may not understand all the words, I may not agree with the presenter's viewpoint or have difficulty with concepts at the outset. But I can get the gist. I know enough of the language and am familiar with its delivery. Not so if it was transmitted in a language I can't speak - or an unfamiliar topic about which my vocabulary is non-existent. I might like the sound of it, sense musical outlines in the undulations of the voice but I wouldn't understand much of what was being said. Same with music that deviates too far from traditional tonality that the listener can no longer get the gist. It's where Schönberg fell flat. Thinking that he could create a new language which magically would be understood by a universal audience. Only Alban Berg who used the system at the time seemed to appreciate that music was the transmitter and the audience, the receiver. To me, Berg did the 'thinking through' at which Schönberg failed. Perhaps if Schönberg's ideas had been introduced more gently reception might have been different. And so with pure atonality (that which avoids key centres at all cost). It conforms to no musically linguistic patterns. It can have rules but in the absence of familiar linguistics it so far remains the province of individual composers. The listener basics are that one learns to listen without expectations. That isn't always easy. What the composer must do is provide means so that listeners have events on which to anchor, so they can reference what's happening at one moment to the next. Unlike serial music, atonal can be approached more gently - more tonal centres - tempi that allow acclimatisation - and gradually build on that. The acceptance of recent, chromatic music suggests that it is starting to enter listeners' repertoire so it's important not to shock them which will simply lead to dismissal.
    2 points
  24. Hello! I'm very new to this platform, but I am a young composer who thought I might find some good feedback and interactions here. Here is my first submission; a short little 'aria' for organ that I have been working on for the last couple of days. It is perhaps more conventional, harmonically and otherwise, than some of my other works. I took direct inspiration from Noel Rawsthorne's 'Aria' (which I am currently learning myself) in many features of the piece, particularly the form and structure. A computer playback version will have to do for now, I'm afraid, but I will try and record this myself when I go in to my local church for some organ practice this week. I hope my registration instructions and our imaginations will be able to overcome the registration of this synthesized version, particularly in the computer's conservative interpretation of ritardandos. Any feedback or suggestions are very welcome!
    2 points
  25. Haven't read everyone's feedback, sorry if I echo someone else. For one, if you're going to edit your piece and post the updates, make sure you edit your original post letting us know you did that. I didn't click every new version you gave us, so you might already know this, but just in case you didn't I thought I'd mention it. I almost didn't see it 🙂 - As a pianist, it's odd for me to see sections with just one staff. Even if you only need say the treble clef, I'd still put the bass clef in with rests. - How come you have 2 notes playing in the flute at times (or maybe other winds)? I don't recall a single moment when you gave us wind harmonies, why not just have the flute and oboe play together. I feel like it was a wasted opportunity to not hear some ideas with the instruments blended. With the type of piece this is, I'd think having solo wind instruments would be more beneficial than whole instrument groups. - Remember that the piano is polyphonic, and although I actually really enjoyed the mystical thin texture you gave us, there were plenty of moments that didn't really feel characteristic to the instrument. You do give us sections of both hands played at the same time, but overall it felt like I could have played the part with one hand. - The rhythms could have used some work, especially in the long whole note sections. Would have been a good time to explore a bit of counterpoint under sustained melodic lines. Again, I felt like the winds were underutilized. Just some random points, hopefully it helps you out a little. I really liked the language you used, and the harp-like vibes in the piano were really cool. Reminded me of traditional Japanese music. Like I said before, the sparse texture overall was VERY cool; I'm so used to people on this site cramming in a bunch of unnecessary notes in every measure of their works, and yours was a breath of fresh air. I'd love to hear any additions or edits you do with this piece in the future, I'm always a fan of hearing future versions in people's music to hear how it evolves and to see if they heeded the advice of others. There are loads of great composers here, be sure to at least consider some issues they had with your music. I've been on this site for years, and their advice has always benefitted me and I'm very grateful for it. Good luck with your music, and thanks for sharing!
    2 points
  26. A little slightly more contemporary piece for solo flute that I have been working on for a while. In the first movement, I make use of a ‘filtering’ technique to develop the material; I began the piece by writing out a progression of modes, a few notes altered by a few semitones each time, which I work through to gradually modulate (with some exceptions!). I went for senza misura for this movement as I was looking for a more contemplative and tranquil tone, hence the title 'Penseroso', and to give performers as much space and creative opportunity as possible, which I something I always strive for. I contrast this with the virtuosic and frantic nature of the second movement ‘Scherzando’. I began by planning a sequence time signatures to be repeated, in such a pattern that an audience would be oblivious, to convey this freneticism. I develop this sequence; I designed an exchange in length within the piece of the high, loud, staccato sections and low, softer legato sections, in which the staccato sections gradually grow shorter as the legato sections grow longer, until roughly halfway, when the staccato sections lengthen again, and the legato sections shorten (I hope I worded that clearly enough!). I am particularly pleased with the sudden shock ending of this movement, designed in contrast to the soft a niente’ of the first movement. I managed to persuade a flautist friend to record this for me, and they have done an excellent job. I hope you enjoy the sounds of a real instrument, unlike last time! Any feedback and suggestions much appreciated.
    2 points
  27. A TV show intro theme I composed inspired by Star Trek, Stargate, and the other usual Star suspects. Let me know what you think of it!
    2 points
  28. The figured bass is there since this is Baroque-tragedy piece; sort of like Bach's BWV 4: Christ Lag in Todesbanden Sinfonia. As for the last two measures, I just forgot to write in the figures, lol. Also, this piece has dynamic markings because I also forgot to hide them in Musescore before uploading the video, haha
    2 points
  29. Though not a fugue per se, I find this vaguely Purcell-ish sonata movement contrapuntally imitative enough to qualify as one of my personal favorite pieces in my production. I am rather unsure as to how a roughly two-minute long non-fugato movement with repeats is supposed to share ranks with my 2nd fugue in B minor, the Anno Domini 2020 fugue in G minor or the Halloween fugue in G-sharp minor, yet somehow my subjective unconscious seems to point in such a strange direction. Probably just me being nonsensically whimsical. Enjoy! Video link: Trio Sonata in F minor - Adagio. - YouTube
    2 points
  30. I am really inspired by @ComposaBoi's Seven Sorrows that I decide to upload an old work composed by little Henry (lol). It's an old work of mine finished in 2014 September, between my ( ) in piano solo and first Piano Sonata. I was way too ambitious then, as I would like to follow the model of Beethoven's String Quartet no. 14 in C sharp minor, op.131, one of my all time favourite piece. It's in the same key as his op. 131; contains seven movements, the same number as Bee's op. 131; and the movements will all be performed in attaca without stopping which also follows Bee's op. 131. At the time of finishing it I though I had completed a masterpiece but of course I am now highly critical of it. But I'm still quite proud of it since it was my first chamber work ever. Detailed are not added there as I didn't have the ability to add those when I composed it. I have some ideas on how to polish it, but I also would like to have you guys' precious opinion on how to polish it since you can always give me new insights and angles to interpret it!! Don't be afraid to criticize or compliment it!! Here is the brief synopsis of the piece: First Movement: Introduction: Adagio mesto e espressivo. C sharp Minor. I was trying to imitate Bee's op. 131, so I used fugue as the opening movement as well, though here it's more the combination of fugue and sonata form. This is my first ever piece in the contrapuntal approach, and I'm quite proud of it despite the errors. The movement introduces three important themes that will appear later on in all the movements: The opening theme (b. 1-11 cello), lamenting theme (b.59-62 1st violin) and a theme I don't know how to call it (b.104-105 2nd violin, appears in tonic b.116-117 1st violin) A quite tragic movement and I love it! Second Movement: Scherzando I: Allegro Vivace. A flat major. Still copying Bee with a scherzando movement follows immediately after a fugal slow movement. Third Movement: Andante. B major. Another fugal movement. I quite like the calmness in it but the fugal technique is not good enough. Fourth Movement: Moderato meastoso. Acts as the bridge to the second part of the Quartet. Fifth Movement: Scherzando II: Allegro Vivace agitato. C sharp minor. Too short and undeveloped to be called a movement. Sixth Movement: Andante molto espressivo. A major. A variation movement as in Bee's fifth movement of op.131 in the same key. The variation skill is not too good though. A transition is used to bridge the final movement. Seventh Movement: Allegro Vivace (No tempo and expression marking??!!). C sharp minor. I LOVE the finale of Bee's op.131: it's so concise and succinct. Here it's a mess. There are some lovely passages but the glue between them fails. Although I keep saying the bad things of this quartet, I am actually grateful for making it. Without it I will never acquire the skills I have to compose subsequent compositions! Here is the full score of the piece: 13-12-2017 String Quartet no 1 Full Score.pdf The score and mp3 of different movements are inserted below. Hope you enjoy it and the day!!! Henry P.S. Thanks to @PeterthePapercomPoser for giving me the suggestion on how to post this!
    2 points
  31. Hello! This is my first sonata for piano trio in a major key. Took me one month to write. I tried to give more emphasis to the violin part that can also be played by flute, and the cello part is a bit less developed. The keyboard part can be played on piano or harpsichord (of course, without dynamics on harpsichord). I tried to maintain a classical style but with some liberties. I. Allegro (sonata form) II. Largo (ternary form) (A major) III. Minuet (and trio) (A major) IV. Rondo (sonata-rondo form) Looking for feedback! Score video (violin and piano): sonata.pdf
    2 points
  32. lol but I also reinvented risset beats on my own without prior knowledge haha 😉 Yeah for the most part the tempo is constantly rising except for the first chorus and the outro. Yes its a linear non linear system I believe. lol "tragedy strikes at a local nightclub, leaving one to ask, how lit is too lit?" No idea haha it was just in my splice folder 😂 thanks man!!
    2 points
  33. The Universe Messiaen is very big. He described several sacale-modes using repetition of interval groups (symmetry). The modes can be transposed chromatically a limited number of times, because the procedure reaches a point where the scale repeats itself enharmonically. The 4th mode has this pattern ST - ST - ST+T - ST - ST - ST - ST+T It is octatonic That is: C - Db - D - F - F# - G - Ab - B You can transpose this mode starting on Db, D, Eb, E and F. So, 6 transpositions (counting on C) Because starting on F# it is enharmonic: F# - G - Ab - B - C - Db - D You can use it harmonically, melodically, polyphonically.... You can make chords that resemble tonal functionality or use it as a mode without tonal center... The transformations you can do with Messiaen modes are endless. He described 7 modes of limited transposition.
    2 points
  34. Vince, I cry while reading your reply. It is so touching and you give me what I lack: confidence. I am not confident and always self-critical. I seldom value what I do and always aim higher. That can be good but it does give too much pressure to myself. You know sometimes it's difficult. Before joining this forum everyone around me do not appreciate my music and playing. I freakingly want to compose, but sometimes lack of encouragement does hinder my progress, as I lack the motivation to compose. I reflect now and find this the main reason of composing the quintet in 6 years. I always say I am lucky to join this forum. It's always great to see talented composers around the world and learn from them. You say I am adamant on sharing my thoughts to others, actually I learn from them each time I review the pieces. Maybe due to the mutual encouragement, I am able to write that wind quintet piece in 9 days. I will definitely post that here in the near future, since I am busying with my piano practicing these few weeks. I can say the same thing to you, except changing piano to guitar (and singing probably)! I always admire your confidence and your ability to encourage others. During these few months' stay I see how many times you are willing to encourage others here. That's thing I treasure you most, not even your great composition. Without you I won't even think of composing that wind quintet piece and joining the call for score, which was a great experience for me. Music-wise I was practicing to develop one motive throughout the piece, and this movement probably inspired by Haydn's monothematic sonata movement as well! You are right the contrast is not great though. Thanks so much for your encouragement, and your appreciation on my works and playing. I am speechless to show how thankful I am. P.S. If you want me to record your piano piece, just tell me and I will play it for free! Just give me practicing time will be fine. Henry
    2 points
  35. Jesus, that's a lot of music! (like my pun? lol) I'm not sure how to begin, so I'll just ramble for a bit. This will probably come across a little random, but hopefully you find some value in my thoughts. So I listened to the whole thing, first of all. I really wanted to get your overall impression rather than dissecting this one movement at a time. I'm honestly glad I did it that way, because your piece is very programmatic which you stated. You constantly bring back themes or perhaps leitmotifs, which I thought was very fitting for the content. After hearing it in its entirety, your piece fell victim to something I predicted when first hearing it. There's lots of sadness and despair to the theme, and even though there can be some moments of joy and redemption, I felt like it would be very hard to capture the mood for an hour of interesting music. Overall, it's a very constant grave/lento tempo throughout, and it was hard to keep interested at times. One thing you could maybe do to enhance the general shape of the music is to have a lot more sections of faster tempos, or maybe more sections with lots of movement in the textures. I know you give us moments of that (mvt. 2 cellos and violas, mvt. 3, but still a walking pace, mvt. 7 with the builds), but I don't think it was enough for an hour long piece. Even if the program element might not literally call for that, I think the music needs it. You probably already know this, but the textures are very lacking. There are lots of tutti and block chords. I strongly encourage you when you begin orchestrating to constantly think of the overall texture. Really think about the instrument groups, the amount of color at your disposal, solo and duet passages, etc. I purposely don't want to give any thoughts on how I would orchestrate any of it, I think that would take away from the fun you'll have when doing so. Just be creative with it is all I mean. Even the several spots where you repeat a theme, really think about the different ways to execute that. The registers were very consistently on the low end of things as well. Vary that up too! You can still paint the picture of a solemn atmosphere by really exploring the instrument ranges as well. I know this version isn't your final vision of the piece, but many of the bass parts could have been given to another cello part instead. Also the 2nd viola going to the violin. Yes you were going for that darker color, but, and especially with the bass, it really sounds muddy with the split parts. You may not like this, but a suggestion I have for you is to nix the idea of the full orchestra and make this for string quartet or another chamber ensemble. For one, it would be much easier to finish a work you have written over the last several years, and you could really learn a ton by giving yourself the restriction in instrumentation to fully utilize the strings. There's a lot of articulations and technique for strings that you didn't use, and maybe it could be a cool opportunity to explore that. There's bowing, pizzicato, glissando, harmonics, and a gazillion other ways to give color for the strings that would be fun to try out. HOWEVER...I know you're very passionate about the material, and this piece is probably very close to your heart, so I'm not saying don't orchestrate it. If that's your goal, that by all means go for it. I'd love to hear this orchestrated. I just would hate for you to spend so much time on a piece without venturing on to new music. You seem to really love orchestral music, so yeah man, do it if it's a major goal for you 🙂 Now, with all that said, I'd like to share some things I really liked about this. My favorite part is the theme at the end of mvt. 2 and brought back in mvt. 7. I love those chords, the harmony is very moving and speaks to my soul. Also, in mvt. 4, around 2:20 and done again later is a really cool section, I just wish it was longer! Mvt. 5 was very cool, I loved the slow chords with the solo bass. Awesome sound, just make sure to add little bits of color, or texture, or movement over the chords, because after a while it tends to get stale. But the idea is very cool, reminds me of something Shostakovich would do. Mvt. 6 had some cool chromatic lines, I really liked that. Again though, think of ways to vary up either the color or the groupings as it wears on me after a while. While I'm thinking of the timpani, also I'd think about what other percussive devices you could use in this. Just remember it's 2023, I'd take full advantage of exploring all of the different options you have in percussion as you go about orchestrating. So in general, congratulations on creating such a behemoth work. I myself have never written anything that long, so kudos to you for being able to see this one through the end. Hopefully I didn't come off as too critical. Yes I feel like this needs a bit of work, especially in your pacing and textures, but I feel like you got the hard part out of the way. You already know all of your themes and harmonies, now you really get to have a lot of fun bringing this more to life by being creative in your orchestration. I'm very curious how this will turn out, definitely let me know once you're completely done if I happen to miss it. Thanks again for sharing!
    2 points
  36. Favourites in that they fire me up one way or another! The tempestuous and threatening - and the jubilant. Shostakovitch's 10th Symphony Scherzo - not alone with this one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCypb--lv1M The jubilant - the Allegro Molto Vivace from Tchaikovsky's Symphony 6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RicAP5l_qr0 (A redering by Boult - far from the most lively. Look up Karajan's) Play both LOUD.
    2 points
  37. Since I also mentioned the ending I thought I'd contribute my 2¢ to this. I think maybe the ending could be made to sound more final by having a gradual ritardando before the end. From my own experience I think even strange harmonies (like in this case a diminished chord) can still give a sense of finality if other elements of the music tend to contribute/suggest it. That's just what I would do. Did you come to the conclusion that it's in C# minor from the very common inclusion of D#'s (even though the key signature is A major and it starts in A major) and the ending chord? I'm not sure if that's enough to say it's in C# minor - to me it seems more ambiguous.
    2 points
  38. I live for the major IV Thanks! Which exactly do you mean by "make scores"? If you mean sheet music, I don't have any sheet music for this atm. Heh, yeah thanks. I remember being really proud of the ending.
    2 points
  39. This is an old piano piece I dug up from years ago (again) that I finally decided to salvage and finish. It's a little rough around the edges but I think that goes without saying with this kind of harmonic style/language. Although I did not actually intend this to be fully atonal - it is quite dissonant and not for the faint of heart! (I mean the bridge is falling down after all - right? LoL) Thanks to @Thatguy v2.0 for helping prepare this rendition in his DAW with a superior piano vst! He probably spent upwards of 4 hours perfecting everything about this little piece that I could pick at! Although our partnership was not without its minor strife I am eternally grateful for his help (even if I seemed at times ungrateful and demanding - sorry!) Thanks for listening and for any constructive observations, comments or critiques you'd like to make! Edit: I've included the original mp3 I exported from Musescore 4. I didn't use Muse Sounds because it wouldn't perform my velocity changes. Thankfully the MS Basic Piano soundfont did take my velocities into account and I added Muse Sounds reverb to it.
    2 points
  40. Hi guys! Have you ever faced some "click moments" in music appreciation, which are sudden sparks and inspirations for you to get into the music and the composer? When you listen to a new work or works from composer that you are not familiar with, you probably have to use some time to get familiar with it to understand what the music is telling you. Sometimes the process can be very long and difficult, while sometimes you can instantly get what the composer is doing and unlock his works easily! I have several moments like this. First it's the example of listening to Mahler. I started with his sixth but didn't get it. I then listened to his seventh and first but I didn't get it. I then listened to his second and at first I didn't get it, until I reach this moment: Those big chords suddenly woke me up from the sleep chamber. I got it! And after listening this I re-listened his 1st, 6th and 7th and still got it. Another example is Beethoven's String Quartet op.135 in F major. I am a huge fan of Beethoven especially his late quartets. But at that time I didn't like his op.135, thinking it "diminutive, classical". Then suddenly I listened to the minore section of the third movement of it and could not stop crying, and I got it again: (I want to use the Yale Quartet Recording but there is none in youtube, so I use this one) These are just two examples of the "click moments" of listening music for me, as I have many others too, but these are the most memorable ones for me since they completely change my perception of the music and the composer. Do you have similar experience and face the "click moments" of listening music as well? Feel free to share them here and post the music which you have instant sparks and inspirations!! Henry
    2 points
  41. Yes! It works. I reset my password using my email. After that I entered using my display name (Luis Hernandez) and the new password. It works in my iMac and iPad. Thanks!!
    2 points
  42. Wonderful miniatures! Very interesting chord progressions, you definitely have a flair for interesting harmony. Well done
    1 point
  43. Thanks for your insight… this was written, as you say, based on intervals. If it has some interest I can show how I thought about its internal relatioship.
    1 point
  44. A great first foray into writing for choir! A couple of thoughts if you want to develop this further: 1. Your soprano part goes too high. You really only want to write notes that high if you are composing a commission for a particular super-soprano soloist who you know can hit those notes and do it gracefully. For the average choir, writing to around a G above the staff for sopranos is about right. If you add a second soprano line in that section, so the lower-voiced sops have something lower to sing, you can stretch the upper part a little. (But not this much!) Another option is to add an accompanying instrumental part and give those upper notes to the player. You could write a piano accompaniment, or add a solo instrument like violin or flute. 2. Find a text! Choral singing is about poetry and the beauty of what is being said, as well as the beauty of how it is said. The only time you hear a choral sound without a real text is movie soundtracks. (It's fine if that's what you want to do, too, but then you'll want to specify if people are singing "ooh" or "aah" or some other filler syllable). Part of the challenge of writing for choir is fitting the notes to the text or the text to the notes well, so if you are working on writing for choir, think about working on that skill as well. 3. Finding your text will help you figure out how to split those long notes up with logical places to breathe. You may want to make a whole note into two half notes on repeated pitches, with each note belonging to a different syllable of text, or remove a tie and do the same thing. Try singing your way through and feel where you want to breathe. Your intuition will probably be pretty good. 🙂 This has a lovely ethereal sound. Try listening to some choral works to get ideas about how to use text and build sound. Here's one I like a lot that has a similar slow cathedral sound, but with funkier harmonies and more parts. The text translates to " O Master of all living, bestowing priceless gifts upon us."
    1 point
  45. I'm highly against this, but it no different than samples being used in rap music and other electronic art forms. Would have been cool to cut the sax out or just have it play hits so we could hear the piano get some time to solo.
    1 point
  46. Hi everyone! I’m a newbie here I’m from Ukraine, Kyiv. I'm the composer & National Music Academy student, Dima Kravets (dersounder). Have experience in music since 5 years old, firstly as a professional pianist, and as a composer later (few years ago). I’m expired by classical, cinematic and contemporary music, playing and composing both. Since Russian-Ukrainian war begun, I feel extremely pain about my Country and our people, about inhuman war we should live with. And it is impossible to imagine our future now without tears on the eyes. I decided to write an orchestral piece about my feelings and what we are living for last month - Freedom and Independence of Ukraine. Honestly, I composed only piano and chamber music pieces before this work (that was a mix of classical-romantic-modern style). Now, as I have no instruments in bomb shelter, I’m trying to Use Logic Pro X to sound my Musical Ideas. Sharing with YOU demo-version of my music musical composition. It is almost complete, but I have some troubles with Mixing and Mastering. I feel this is what I’m not quite good at. Is in unmastered and no-mixed version. So, it will be better to listen it with headphones. Need any of your suggestions, professional advices (both composition and music production), your opinion or just a short comment. I will be grateful for your attention! Link to my music: The Orc Invasion of Kyiv UPD: added a score, generated by Logic Pro. The score is without Drums (as an audio file) and Sound Effects (have no idea how to write down it easily).
    1 point
  47. The number one principle for good balance is to remember that brass is louder than woodwind in loud dynamics, however in quiet dynamics it can play as quietly as the woodwind (the latter group's biggest advantage is its projection.) Trumpets The most powerful brass instrument. Besides its obvious use for fanfares, you can see it used a lot to punctuate loud sections. An interesting point, and one that leads to a good discussion. The thing is, that modern trumpets are very different to the trumpets of yore. All you have to hear is the contrast between a baroque trumpet or F Tromba and the modern Bb trumpet to understand why trumpets used to only be used in loud sections. Even current D/Eb trumpets have a much brighter, more martial sound. Nowadays, trumpets, especially in their low register, can be used to fill out gaps in chords, and can carry beautiful solo lines. Overuse of trumpets is one of my personal bugbears in much music of the Romantic period. Auxiliaries: Cornets have a round broad sound - listen to a British brass band or authentically performed old concert band music to hear them in action. Flugelhorns can act as a bridge between trumpets and horns or play a descant harmony to the horn quartet. Horns The brass instrument that is most like a woodwind. It can play loud, soft, chorales and martial melody lines. It has a huge range, although notation is notoriously odd (horn players are often able to transpose accurately on sight because of this.) In loud passages, horns may need to be doubled to balance with the rest of the brass. Flutes, oboes and clarinets can then double above the trumpets. Auxiliaries: Ah, the Wagner Tuba. Despite its name, it is very much a horn. It can be used to form a quartet below the horns, due to a slightly lower tessitura but a similar range. Trombones Don't write glissandi if you aren't sure of them. Google a slide position chart if you are unsure! Trombones are well used in the orchestra, for good reason. A trio sounds broad and expansive, even at quiet dynamics. It is best to score 1/2/Bass as this is what many orchestras will have and forms the most resonant grouping. Trombones cannot play extremely fast because of the slide, so watch out for this. Auxiliaries: Alto Trombone. I wish this was used more. It has a much lighter sound and a slightly faster technique. Leopald Mozart wrote a concerto for this instrument, and many orchestral trombonists double on alto. Tuba I have no idea about the tuba. Like Caters, I very rarely score for it. All I know is that its timbre is very different from the trombones and should be treated differently. Many composers preferred to use Contrabass Trombone instead. Don't worry about the brass overpowering the woodwind. Generally speaking, orchestral players are well versed in the fact instruments have naturally different volumes. Brass instruments were invented to play loud, but due to modern developments they are gaining a range of expression not unlike the woodwind. Scoring for the brass is less difficult than the woodwinds because the register changes are smoother. If you want to find some good setups, check out the 'Harmony in the Brass' section from Rimsky-Korsakov's Principles of Orchestration. Also, you could have a look at https://bandestration.com. I have not looked at the brass section on this blog, although the woodwind is excellent - very detailed descriptions on each instrument. Nb @caters I believe that the "crescendo of mass" that you speak about is known as a textural crescendo.
    1 point
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