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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/23/2020 in all areas

  1. Okay, so today I was feeling pretty bad and for some reason I thought I needed to improvise something dark using the Dies Irae theme. I wanted to portray my feelings in the freest possible way but at the same time record it just in case something interesting would happen. This wasn't my first take, but I didn't do many tries either, so you can be sure that 97% of it is pure improvisation. Anyways, share your thoughts about this. I know it is pretty mediocre compared with good improvisations, but I'm still an amateur and I don't have tools that would be helpful like perfe
    3 points
  2. I suppose this comes back to using instruments well - keys which take lots of instruments low into their range will sound heavy and muddy. Sometimes the only option is to transpose it, but this might affect another instrument! That's why, when writing for a group of instruments, you need to be thinking about their ranges from the start to make sure that your piece will fit nicely under them. In my workshop experience, I try to write idiomatically for the instruments, in keys that will suit them, and this has been picked up on a few times.
    2 points
  3. Piano piece I made a little bit ago. Nothing fancy. Let me know your thoughts!
    2 points
  4. Hi, after having studied John Field's 18 Nocturnes, particularly his left hand patterns, I wrote a couple of short, tonal, and simple pieces However I couldn't help it, and some "more modern" harmonic changes are present. Or some kind of metric modulation. And other devices. I was interested in this composer as the father of the Nocturne.
    2 points
  5. First time writing for an ensemble this big, took a while, includes a small cello solo. Let me know what you guys think!
    2 points
  6. Hello everyone, and a belated Merry Christmas. Thank you to everyone who was involved in putting together this competition, particularly @Tónskáld, who managed the member voting survey, and @Monarcheon, who selected the list of themes that members voted on as the subject for this competition. Thanks also to all of the entrants for their fine submissions and all who voted. I hope that everyone is pleased with their finished works, regardless of whether they won or not. After all, that is the purpose of these competitions – to spark creativity with a bit of friendly competition. Please feel
    2 points
  7. Thanks a lot PaperComposer for your comments. I agree that there are some similarities when comparing the harmonics and the kind of rag-time like rhythm, which Debussy has used in his Golliwags Cakewalk. But he was actually not the composer who inspired me to write the piece. It was Nino Rota. I suppose that this was difficult to guess. You may be right that I over-complicated some of the harmonies. I have not composed something like this before, and I agree that my writing has to improve. Thank you again for your valuable feedback! Thank you very much for y
    2 points
  8. I'm just starting on this forum and just wanted to share a piece i made recently.
    2 points
  9. Great job! I love the major/minor cross-relations you make in the melody in the beginning on saxophone solo. I once had an idea to combine the Polish National Anthem with the American Anthem in a sort of variations piece that would be titled "The Polish-American Heritage Anthem". That piece never came to fruition (it was a little too ambitious for my abilities as a composer at the time I think). Glad to hear your attempt was quite successful! The piece was definitely in good taste and never ventured into any kind of sacrilegious territory so well done!
    2 points
  10. Thank you for this. 🙂
    2 points
  11. So I wrote this hoping to base all of the melodic material in my piece on the original theme by Yoshimatsu (Waltz of the Rainbow Colored Roses). However, I deliberately didn't listen to the original piece (only the first couple of seconds where the fragment of the theme is presented) so as to, hopefully be inspired only by the fragment and allow for more possibilities which might have been tainted had I known how Yoshimatsu developed it in his piece. I came up with many versions of the theme in my musical notepad and then more extensively in my notebook without really any idea of how I was g
    2 points
  12. This is a repost of the Confutatis movement of a Requiem, I have been working on for quite awhile. I made some minor changes in the orchestration, mostly in the second half of the piece. The first half is written as a simple, mournful canon intending to depict those condemned to the "flames of woe" resigned to their fate as their punishment is carried out. The second half is intended to depict angels descending from heaven, represented by the tremolo strings, to comfort those who have been saved by their contrition.
    2 points
  13. Yes, I can send the vote tally for your respective pieces in a private message. As for the tallies of the three winners, I'll see what I can do.
    2 points
  14. Nice job! Where's the score? LoL I voted for your piece for 2nd place because I felt there were other pieces that developed the theme more fully. You definitely had the most unique reharmonization of the theme and overall won my greatest overall impression that the music made on me. You chose to tell a unique musical story after the presentation of the theme but I didn't really feel like it was really related in any way directly to the theme. I felt like you could have used the theme more extensively throughout your piece and maybe explain the story behind the title and the lyrics mo
    2 points
  15. hello everyone, I am back, this is my new piece in Japanese traditional style, hope you like it. instrument: koto & piano koto is a kind of picking string instrument the video: https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1rA411s71K/
    2 points
  16. I understand where you're coming from, but I think my argument has been misinterpreted. In no point of my answer was I implying that a piece I made would not win or be hampered due to bias, I stated clearly I am not trying to downplay orchestral works, or trying to blame external factors for faults that I've made in my composing. My intention of typing out such a lengthy post was to ask for a traditional judging component as I felt that it would minimise at least some bias as aforementioned. I am not trying to abolish such a system, or deny its benefits as stated very clearly in the last parag
    2 points
  17. Thank you very much! I definitely am very much influenced by Mozart's Requiem when I was working on it. I do think this is one of the better movements in terms of having the music reflect the text. Thanks for the kind words! The vocals are from Symphonic Choirs by East West which has a word builder that allows articulation of words which sounds really great but very tricky to implement properly. A very kind member here (who unfortunately isn't really active here much any more) who was more experienced with it generously helped me with it for this and the other completed movements.
    2 points
  18. I like this but I feel like you limit yourself to only harmonic and melodic variation. You could also change say .. the tempo or the register at which the individual instruments played. Correct me if I am wrong but it sounds like you write for the instruments in basically the middle of their range. Also maybe this piece didn't particularly need a tempo change anywhere but it's just an idea which could really make your music much more diverse even within the span of just one piece. Of course it's still quite atmospheric and heady. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  19. Original Hymn I wrote and PaperComposer transcribed. Enjoy
    1 point
  20. Hi everyone. This is a Sonata for Horn and Piano which I wrote recently. The description file explains what each movement is depicting. The recording has real musicians. Hope you enjoy it. Any constructive feedback is appreciated.
    1 point
  21. Well, a very nice piece indeed. Modern, energetic and something to re-listen to again and again not just because the contrast in the variations sustains interest but the contrapuntal interleaving of parts suggests a listener will derive new experiences with each audition - like, notice new things. I liked the 'differential dynamics, example bar 15 and on where you're crossfading parts, dimming down one while crescendoing another. The phrasing seems excellent. Are you a string player? The vertical (spatial) layout gives the piece room to breath properly if that makes sense, no muddin
    1 point
  22. Put the link between two brackets of the word YouTube, like this: [youtube] [/youtube]
    1 point
  23. Same, I have not received it as well. I think @Tónskáldis pretty busy with external matters, perhaps we could give him a bit more time.
    1 point
  24. Comments from the composer: "The theme follows a simple A-A’-B-A structure as an abridged version of the original Waltz of the Rainbow-coloured flowers by Takashi Yoshimatsu. The theme reorchestrated in the variations follows a mainly violin melody with the cello and piano largely as accompaniment. The theme’s tempo marking is Allegro con Expressivo and is in D minor. The following variations are in the ascending chromatic scale. Variation 1: Allegretto con Spirito in D# minor How the Theme was developed: Heterophonic texture in A section, with all 3 instruments playing the them
    1 point
  25. May I humbly invite you to listen to Theme and Variations for solo piano, composed years ago but recently recorded. Heavily influenced by Ludwig! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loA2GX6cof8 Many thanks.
    1 point
  26. A band director I've known for many years had always wanted to commission a piece for his band, and as he was preparing to retire, he approached me with this idea. This was in 2016 during the political upheaval of both parties and the eventual election. In 2020, I decided to send this to my publisher for release. Indivisible "fractures" the US national anthem, then puts the pieces back together again, more or less. The introduction is dark and haunting, takes off in a fast "angry" section, a slow lyrical section, and a celebratory finale of the final verse of the anthem. Each section cor
    1 point
  27. I found it really effective, creating a powerful, evocative atmosphere. I'm very interested in background music for film and slideshows, so I think this would work brilliantly for a dramatic scene in a film where the director needs strong energy and emotion. I really liked the abrupt ending with that quiet sound left hanging. It's a very realistic emotional effect, where you've just gone through a very moving experience and are left a little dazed.
    1 point
  28. So this christmas I've been working in this small piano sonata that is based on the theme from @Ivan1791 All movements are directly or partially conected to the theme. The first movement is in sonata form and has the theme as subject A. The second movement has the theme as a baseline (4 times slower). The third has little motifs from the theme in the scherzo, and in the trio there is a fugue wich subject is based on the theme. Finally the finale is in theme and variations based on the theme. I hope you all enjoy and any feedback is welcomed!🙂
    1 point
  29. Hmm that is true. If I were in your situation, I would have notated down a crescendo or dim. over just that single note and maybe play around with and increase the velocity change in the crescendo or diminuendo. However, both methods are not a great workaround and hence when I was still using Musescore I tended to avoid sharp hairpins over a single note because of this. The paid software, such as Dorico (which I've switched to now) and Sibelius, both have hairpins so you could try looking to upgrade your software if this is a really pressing issue.
    1 point
  30. youre literally chopin man.. nice
    1 point
  31. Hmm have you tried using invisible accents? The accents (with tenuto) increase the dynamics for a particular note temporarily for Musescore so you could use that? But it does come with its own side effects like sounding too forceful. It appears that this is an issue with most notation software, note just Musescore, as sudden cresc. and dim. are normally not well articulated. The other option is to put in an invisible dynamic marking on that note and put another invisible dynamic marking on the next note with invisible crescendos and diminuendos between
    1 point
  32. Beautiful feedback! Thanks a lot 🙂
    1 point
  33. I really like the double time sound, not sure what it is called starting at second 44. During the intro, the melody reminded me of building into something remeniscent of "for he's a jolly good fellow". It just sounds familiar, not sure if anyone else is getting that. But hey, I really enjoyed listening.
    1 point
  34. Thank you! I am glad to hear that you found my style in this piece unique. When composing, I felt like my melodies were inspired a bit too much by video-game music but I think I orchestrated it quite differently than that. I think you're totally right about all that - I just do not have the capability to do anything about this currently with MuseScore 3. I am hoping however, that when MuseScore 4 comes out some of these capabilities will be added to the program as it will be both a notation program and a sequencer simultaneously from what I heard. Thanks for your input!
    1 point
  35. I'm usually not a great fan of such "experimental" music, but I must admit I really enjoyed some areas, e.g.: from 0:23-0:35 or 0:46-1:00, very interesting ending. The beginning was too an-harmonic to my taste. As for 0:35-0:46... I would not dare try it on the piano. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  36. Congratulations to the winner and the 2nd and 3rd place winners. I wonder if we could be provided the number of votes each of the three winners received as well as the total number of voters/votes. Also, can the rest of us participants get a private message of the number of votes that we received, if any?
    1 point
  37. a seasoned composer who knows exactly what hes doing, when he's doing it. I envy that. Very bright and colorful piece and orchestration. Love how its always moving around quickly.
    1 point
  38. In meas. 42 I felt like it would have been cool if the bass voice played an Eb on beat 2 to transition between the E natural and the D. I think the pitfall of including so much free counterpoint in your fugue is that the associations between the subject and the surrounding material are lost and everything starts to be perceived as a sort of contrapuntal noodling. I know you said you included lots of invertible counterpoint but if you don't give the listener space or a melodic hook to let them know they're hearing something familiar then they get buried in the complexity of the incessant coun
    1 point
  39. I think all the parts work really well together! I really like how you harmonized the main theme in the beginning by starting on the subdominant (or is it a supertonic in 1st inversion?). Just by looking at the theme by itself that kind of approach is unexpected and it really gives your main theme harmonic freshness. The part that I would modify if this were my composition is the part where the viola melody is accompanied by the rest of the ensemble pizzicato. it seems like just straight quarter notes makes it sound too march-like for me. Really quite an enjoyable and quaint little theme
    1 point
  40. Long time no see. I was busy with military business, romantic relationships, covid, etc. Now, at long last, I managed to compose a music piece after more than half a year. The piece is based around the coda of the known Bach piece "Toccata and Fugue in Dm", reimagined as a boss fight with three loop-able phases and transitions. Would love to hear your thoughts and opinions. As usual, constructive criticism is most welcome. This piece has no score because I don't think it's perform-able.
    1 point
  41. Thanks a lot! I will try to remake this invention with the ideas you provided me!
    1 point
  42. I like this one too! This time you included a dominant-level statement of the motif in the exposition. Your episodes venture into F major and A minor territory and you build some nice sequences and canonic imitation between the two voices. I also agree with @Jean Szulc that your material sometimes seems accompanimental because it's so triadic and just outlining chords. To counteract this kind of impression in a melody you could try including some passing tones or neighbor tones or appoggiaturas or escape tones in between the chord tones of your main motif. For the counterpoint to the main
    1 point
  43. Your tenor parts are pretty low so although I'm usually a baritone I could totally sing your tenor and bass parts if you want, however you need to set up some practice tracks of JUST the sections you want recorded. Also for the solos I suggest adding a piano reduction (if you're on finale this is easy because it's an option in the tools section I believe, you just highlight the sections you want in the piano reductions and boom you're done besides some formatting) so the soloist can know what they're supposed to be hearing underneath otherwise its hard to tell if you're singing the right notes
    1 point
  44. Thanks for the observation I forgot to correct that Eb. About the breathing, I know is hard that's why I played it at 100 BPM, because the original 120 are almost imposible for me.
    1 point
  45. Although this is not my favorite style, I like your piece. It is interesting enough with some harmonic surprises. Perhaps the dotted rhythm becomes too insistent.
    1 point
  46. If you continue to make music as sincerely, interestingly and honestly as you do, then I'm your listener for life. But, to be honest, I like miniature cycles of pieces a little more than large forms. Anyway, thank you for your music.
    1 point
  47. I like this! There's some nice use of augmentation and diminution of the subject throughout! Although I do take some exception to how the subject was derived from the name (I do understand that it had to be done selectively as not all the letters of the name could have a musical meaning) since La in A would be F# (the correct syllable for F in A minor is Le which occurs later in the name but you don't use it as such). Also, you interpreted the S as So but you could also have interpreted it as Es which in European would mean Eb (although that's just an option - understandably there's many wa
    1 point
  48. I think, with equal temperament now the standard, the keys no longer really have unique feelings associated with them in any scientific sense -- other than the range of the instruments being used producibg different timbres. But people still tend to assign the keys general moods based on (or simply inspired by?) the days before equal temperament, when there were very real differences between the keys. In Ye Olden Days, there would be quite a bit of difference in the ratio of the sound waves in, say, a major third in one key versus a major third in another key. One might be much closer to
    1 point
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