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  4. Monarcheon

    SUMMER 2018 Competition: Results

    @Gustav Johnson @Noah Brode @Ken320 I am interested in examining the relationship between your pieces and your stories further. Would you consent to me using your pieces and stories as examples in an analytical semiotics research project I'm conducting?
  5. Gustav Johnson

    SUMMER 2018 Competition: Results

    Ditto to all of the above. I meant what I said in that these are helping me so much as a composer, and I can't find a substitute for them anywhere else. Thanks all, and good job @Ken320! Until next time? 🙂 Gustav
  6. Luis Hernández

    Original Piano Composition No.2

    Definetively, you are under the influence of Conlon Nancarrow. In fact their compositions were much more complicated. In that sense, soime parts, as they are definite, sound like a piano roll in a Far West movie. Interesting. If your intention is writing for this kind of piano roll, you have no limits.
  7. Luis Hernández

    SUMMER 2018 Competition: Results

    Contratulations to you all. I think it's a wonderful work and effort including Monarcheon as a Judge.
  8. Luis Hernández

    My best try at a 4 part fugue

    You can do a fugue with only two voices, it's easier to control. And with time, go for more voices.
  9. Alexblog

    Zdravas Mária(Ave Maria)

    Excellent!!! Filled with inspiration !!! I want to make something similar too !!! is there a score?
  10. Ken320

    SUMMER 2018 Competition: Results

    It’s nice to win things and it doesn’t happen that often to be blasé about it, so I’m very happy for the win! It was never assured in any case. I am also happy that the two remaining contestants, Gustav and Noah, kept up their end of the bargain and produced fine works of their own. I wish the others had done so, but they did not. It would have for a more interesting competition. Similarly, I wished there was more than one judge. It’s really not fair to the competitors, and especially to Monarcheon, to have to shoulder the burden alone. But she did and I’m very thankful to her as well. I can’t quibble with the scoring. I agree with most of her appraisals, from concept to execution to presentation. I got such a late start, which is a little uncharacteristic for me. I like to think that I would have mitigated some of the problems with more time. But as Judge Judy is fond of saying, Coulda woulda shoulda. Thanks, YC's
  11. Pacman12

    My best try at a 4 part fugue

    What are the other types of fugues?
  12. Luis Hernández

    My best try at a 4 part fugue

    I still wonder why many of us want to write this kind of fugues. The idea of counterpoint is very attractive in our minds. But to resemble classic counterpoint, we have to follow the basic rules. There are many collisions in the writing for example: First you have C+E+D, in strong point Second you hae D + B + C, idem Also there are parallels: here a fifth Controlling four voices is quite hard. I think that if one wants to start with fugues, do it with two voices.
  13. Congratulations to all that entered! You all picked very unique ways of portraying the end of the world, ways I wouldn't have expected going in. It was a refreshing experience for me and there was serious merit to all the entries submitted. I don't think we're going to have another competition in a while because of the low turnout this time, but we'll play it by ear. Because of these same circumstances, I can't grant the main prize we had going, but the HoF will still be considered. Thank you all again for participating! SCORES: 1. @Ken320 - 69/100 2. @Gustav Johnson - 62/100 3. @Noah Brode - 59/100
  14. AngelCityOutlaw

    Form Up!

    Thanks a lot, man!
  15. Last week
  16. Ken320

    The Emissary

    *** Firstly, let me say that I would love to have observed you as you made the audio for the prologue and epilogue - I'm fascinated by the sounds you used and the way you used them together, and would love to know how to do that. Secondly, electric clarinet?!?!?! Does that actually exist?!?!?! **** Thank you, Gustav. Me too! I was in great shape for the beginning and the end, but frazzled during everything else. I definately mean for it to be playable by real musicians. Some of your questions would be answered if I had remembered to subimt an appropriate abstract for this, along with performance notes, etc. As it is, the judges will have to infer everything from just the story and the music, if they so choose. If you uncompressed the little story here it would take up years, and then the music might be of shorter movements, more episodic. But in the compessed version I had to make the transitions more immediate. So I limited it to ONE. When the music changes from the drones into rhythm and finally song, that represents (one) spontaineous happening in London, with English musicians, etc. Make sense? All in all, the melodies near the end are based on the drone theme which is based on the opening theme and finally coalesced as the Brits might do it.
  17. Starting out with a bang really got my attention in a hurry! I also liked your depiction of the "eerie" in that the harmonies were actually lovely and maybe more fanciful than "uncomfortable." That was a good choice which kept it firmly in the realm of music and not sound painting.I especially like the minor key meloies and the references to "The day the Earth Stood Still," whether intended or not. I'm glad you took the time to contribute with this brief but memorable journey. Good luck to you in the competition!
  18. This is a very fine achievement, Gustav. It is both episodic and cohesive, both within the movements and between them. Never boring, you carried a high emotion throughout the momentum and essentially never let up. All good qualities for battle, and music. I didn’t walk away with a melody to hang onto but that’s fine. I think you challenged the limits of some of the players with lengthy ostinatos, and I agree with Luis about leaving the repeated notes naked for too long. Not at the beginning, but for me, at the end. And a melody superimposed over them would have been icing on the cake. And in any case, it's back set driving. Good luck to you in the competition!
  19. Musicworks’ 2018 Electronic Music Composition Contest is now open. Musicworks’ annual juried contest spotlights new musical talent from around the world and offers cash prizes and opportunities to be published and heard. First prize is $500 CDN, a composer profile in Musicworks 133, Spring 2019 issue (both in print and online) and the composition released on the Musicworks 133 CD. Second prize is $200 CDN and composer coverage on musicworks.ca in 2019. Third prize is $100 CDN and composer coverage on musicworks.ca in 2019. Compose an experimental piece in any electronic-music genre—acousmatic, electroacoustic, glitch, soundscape, intelligent dance music (IDM), turntable art, or video music. The contest is open to entries from anywhere in the world and from artists at any stage of their careers. Pieces must be previously unpublished, i.e. not released on a commercially available recording at the time of submission. Maximum length:10 minutes. Accepted file types: MP3 or MP4 only. Contest entry fee is $25 CDN and includes a one-year subscription to Musicworks—less than our normal subscription rate! Additional entries are $5 each, unlimited. Contest closes October 26, 2018. Prize details, eligibility and assessment criteria, rules and restrictions, and entry portals can be found at musicworks.ca
  20. JBegley

    Mushroom Grassland Level

    Oh. I meant the syncopation gave the percussion more variety than if it were just a straight beat. I should have said ''syncopation.'' I guess ''variety'' was the wrong word to describe what I was thinking. haha.
  21. Ken320

    Ruining the Grass

    Well, you’re right of course. I found it amusing that you would ask pointed questions, then consider it and more often than not say ... Naa, I'm stkicking with the original. I Think your work has matured a lot since the earlier days here. I hope you don’t mind me saying that. It’s obvious that you take your craft seriously, and you should be happy that you’ve achieved an overall level of predictable quality in its artfulness and musicallity. Often times we get bogged down with minutia and lose sight of the bigger picture. Funny thing about quality thogh. It's a beast that requires more and more care and feeding over time.
  22. https://musescore.com/user/28048203/scores/5196302 I still need more practice, but I felt this was decent!
  23. Arthur1124

    Mushroom Grassland Level

    Thanks. Could you please define the "variety" of the rhythm section you're talking about in this topic?
  24. Muhammadreza

    Un Chien Andalou

    I love the movie "Un Chien Andalou" or "An Andalusian Dog", which is a 1929 short film by Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali (glorious names, aren't they?). I also love alternative and avant-garde style of metal music, so today I made this track. Actually, the first riff was a little warmup for me, I connected my guitar to laptop and recorded it. It actually sounded "metal" to me, so I decided to use it in a song, I glued three parts together and "Andalusian Dog" was born 🙂
  25. RaphaelWalsh

    Andante For Strings in C# Minor

    Thanks for your feedback everyone! @Luis Hernández Listening back, I definitely used the wrong string patch, and it really doesn't do the piece justice. I have since upgraded to LA Scoring Strings and will probably release a version with that patch. I also agree about countermelodies, I will probably revise this piece after I finish a larger project. @Maarten Bauer Appreciate the tips greatly, I'm still new to scoring and so I wasn't sure what the layout should be. @Kvothe I screenshotted parts of the score, then put them together with the track in Final Cut X
  26. Gustav Johnson

    The Emissary

    I've read the story, and the piece makes much more sense now. Beautiful to listen to. Firstly, let me say that I would love to have observed you as you made the audio for the prologue and epilogue - I'm fascinated by the sounds you used and the way you used them together, and would love to know how to do that. Secondly, electric clarinet?!?!?! Does that actually exist?!?!?! There are a few places where instruments are doing impossible (or at least highly irregular!) things, like the trombones hitting B's and C's above the Treble staff! Mind you I'm looking at the condensed score, so maybe that's not actually the trombones, but if so I'm not sure how possible that is. Stuff like that, but I have the impression this isn't meant to be performed live, rather performed via keyboards/etc. and mixed into a final track. In that case, do whatever the heck you want because computers can do anything. Compositionally, I don't have much to say because it's very good. The instrumental lines worked together quite well, each waiting as another moved or else complementing it in some way. I don't feel a solid melody take me until the Electric Clarinet finishes its eighth notes. Then things started to feel more melodic. Good violin line soon after, nice to have something to hold onto. Now you're wrapping up the prologue in a very satisfying way. Enter the violin and others, I'll be interested to hear how the others become affected by the violin melody, as your story suggests. Interesting harmonies and harmonic rhythms. I hear some of the violin work in the woodwinds/brass, that's nice, especially with the fragmentation. The separation (in pitch range and in texture) between backgrounds and melodic content helps to clarify things as I listen. Now I'm at the lighter section, more staccato. Nice! A beautiful change in character, well executed. Not sure I understand what point in the story it aligns with, except the general hopefulness as people join the music. This section is probably my favorite as a listener - it has an EXCELLENT balance in rhythmic movement and sustained sounds. What's with the new themes at K and beyond? They're nice and well executed, but unrelated except in style to the previous ideas - at least to my ear. Maybe there's some music theory thing I'm missing that ties them into the previous ideas. Beautiful ending, perfect for the story. Your work has made me reconsider the sounds of the Apocalypse, thank you! Good job, sir! Gustav Johnson
  27. pateceramics

    Ruining the Grass

    Thanks for the vote of confidence, but I still like to check in, in case there's an issue I haven't thought about. Published composers get editors assigned to them who haggle with them over the best ways to present their scores and act as an extra set of eyes for stupid mistakes. The rest of us have to hope to achieve a level of polish that will someday earn us an editor to debate with. More opinions are ALWAYS welcome. And it feels like we're more likely to give each other honest critiques here on the anonymous (sort of) internet than we would to musician friends we know in "real" life. It helps that the whole stated purpose of this website is to give and receive feedback. In the real world, people have other reasons that they know and spend time with you musically that may affect their ability to be be entirely honest and forthcoming even if you ask them directly for a critique.
  28. Gustav Johnson

    Cataclysm (Summer 2018 Competition)

    This is good work, Noah. I like the themes and the way you build it/etc., so points there. A really nice contrast with the lyrical section in the middle. Watch for unconventional orchestration things (i.e. the flute in the lower range would be way covered up by the rest of the instruments accompanying it). The chords in the third section are truly awesome - they have the right character for an ending. I think that really highlights one of the strengths of this piece: your harmonic ideas. The melodic motifs were developed in as much as they were passed around, but you might have strengthened the development by choosing a snip of the motif and altering it as you developed. For example: On the last notes of this theme in the viola solo, you added sixteenth notes as you passed it around. Try maybe altering the interval between the third-to-last pitch and the penultimate pitch? Or altering the interval to get to the lowest pitch? Or something similar. The rhythmic ideas and harmonic ideas are good, and you made good use of instrumental "gestures". Strengthen the melodies (at least at points, doesn't need to be all the time!) so the audience has something a little more obvious to follow. Honestly I struggle with these skills a lot, too, so take my thoughts with a grain of salt! Loved listening, thanks for submitting! Gustav
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