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Lotsy piano

My first piano etude (easy-intermediate)

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This my very first piano etude.

I'm not very good at identifying the grade level of different pieces, so I just say it is around "easy-intermediate" level. 🙂


I was thinking a lot, what should be the title of this,
and finally I've found a very creative title for it: Etude No. 1

 


The ossia staff line is there just to allow people to play the piece easier who have smaller than 9th white keys interval hand-size.

Thank you for your feedback, and

have a funny day Everybody 🙂

Edited by Lotsy piano
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Very very good job!! You could call it étude in C major.

This was bad for me, because I'm currently doing a set of 24 études (intermediate, maybe early advanced, 4-6 in 8 grade level) and one of the études I was preparing was very similar to this. I was going to take a walking bass and semiquavers "answering" up, but I guess even if the factors are neighbours, the product doesn't have to be equal, (Key was E minor).

If i had to criticise one thing is that the end of C chord with E as as the root note instead of C, doesn't convince to and end, but if you wanted to produce a end that represents that there's something else coming, then it's good. Great job again!

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@J.Santos Thank you for your thoughts J! 🙂

I will consider your Étude in C major title idea!

If you find something interesting in my music that you like very much, you can copy some of it to your music, I don't mind at all don't worry. I'm here to learn too, as we never stop learning, so let's learn together! 🙂

(PS. Maybe you missed the clef change, the last 2 bars are in treble clef, but I think the smaller size of that treble clef makes it easier to miss, especially if the sheet music shows only 1 staff line at a time (1 or 2 or 3 bars in this case), especially sight-reading fast stuff, which I'm very bad at, in my country we don't have (at least I never ever had) sight-reading exams or exercises or class, etc.. I have a bachelor organ diploma (3 lines of staff for 2 hands and 2 feet), but I'm terrible at sight-reading, if I could go back in time, I would learn to sight-read much better before I start to learn my harder and harder pieces, that way I would learn at least the new notes much faster too, because the way I had to do is just to memorize the cr.. out of it 🙂 and that made my learning time painfully slow while I was in the "learning-new-notes"-phase of the new pieces, so my sight-reading level is at around Grade 2 ABRSM piano, Grade 3 at best))

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Very good work! Just right for a beginner/intermediate student. It is a simple etude but to write a simple and good piece is not always so simple. I think that your harmonic and melodic progression is excellent. Also, when listening to your other uploads, I must say that you actually have a feeling for this, which is great.

The rhythmic structure of the piece is a nice choice. Of course, this structure has been used  many  times by other composers ( my first thought, when looking at your piece, went to the 21th prelude (in B-flat) of the first album of “ Das Wohltemperiete Klavier”)

Funny to say that I have also considered writing an étude using this structure (and so, apparently, has J.Santos). But I  think that this is no problem at all. There are an infinitive number of new possibilities!,

Thanks a lot for uploading this little piece.

  

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@panta rei
Thank you very much for your kind comment, I really appreciate your encouraging words!

I can't remember any (specifically)piano etudes that uses this same pattern, because I'm not a pianist, but I'm an organist, and in my school organists had to learn some (usually easier-intermediate level) piano pieces and I remember playing patterns like this one in some mandatory piano piece which I forgot the title, but I think it was Haydn, which was a little bit surprising to me, because at that time I considered this pattern as a typical baroque pattern, and I actually almost never learned any classical piece on the organ (I mean classical classical if you know what I mean :), not classical baroque, but classical classical), my only classical piece was a 4-handed 4-feet organ arrangement of some less known classical composer whose name I forgot by now, but as an organist I can say that this pattern in organ music (at least baroque) is very common, probably most common in preludiums or toccatas especially when the composer want his piece sound flashy. Even earlier baroque like Buxtehude pieces has this pattern many times (not as a whole etude piece, but maybe just a short part of a toccata or something like that), so I thought I will try to make my first etude with this kind of "standard" pattern, because I wanted to keep things simple for the first try.

I think it's a good idea that you and J.Santos (an now me too :)) write etude with the same pattern, because this makes it a little bit easier to analyze our pieces (if we want to analyze them), because we don't really have to analyze anything about the pattern itself, so this way it becomes easier to learn from eachother's pieces which is always useful I think.

I'm looking forward to listen to both of your etudes, I'm sure they will be great! I checked your musics too, and I think I can definitely can learn a lot of tips/tricks from them!

Happy composing and happy weekend! :)

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