Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jan-Peter de Jager

Een vorig leven

Recommended Posts

I was experimenting today with the following 'scale': C, C#, D, E, F, F#, G, A, A#, B, C.

This was just an experiment... Hope you like tho :-)

PDF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Utilizing synthetic scales like this is tricky -mainly cause one has a tendency to attempt to maintain major/minor tonal structures and functions. Sometimes, the chords derived from the synthetic scale can be used in much the same manner as they are in major/minor tonal structures -more often then not, as is the case here, they don't.

So... my thoughts on this....

1. I think you noted at the beginning the differentiation between harmonic structures (your synthetic scale vs. M/m tonality). This is clear in your avoidance of homophonic/monophonic textures. In other words, you decided to write contrapuntally. This was a good choice -and I think it lent itself well to the scale you used.

2. That said, I think you didn't explore the scale or your material as well as it could have been. One of the niceties of composing with a synthetic scale is that you have the liberty to explore more strident tonal relationships built into the intervallic sequences of your scale. So far, there's very little -if any- exploration here. I would have loved to of seen more.

3. The ending doesn't quite work. It seems to waiver in a sort of resolution that is unfulfilled -which the material is in striking contrast with. Again, I think this is more to do with the lack of exploration of the scale itself. You hadn't given foresight into how to resolve the material within the environment setup by the basic scalar foundation. More exploration of the harmonic potential of your scale would fix this easily.

I've always been a fan of synthetic scales and highly advocate their use as an alternate means to tonal writing. When done well, you can present compelling ideas that lend themselves well to musical development and capitulation. Nice work here. Would love to see more!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little more explanation and a response to the comments:

After choosing the scale I chose the melody. I applied these durations to the pitches of the melody (there are four phrases): 1. Long short short long long long short long | 2. long long short long short short long short long | 3. long long long short short long | 4. long long long short short long long short long short long|
In the cello and contrabass I used the same durations but slower and of different lenghts (since long-short are broad categories).
The violas go at times with the violins rhymically, at times with the cellos/contrabass and sometimes have there own rhythm. 

After 12 bars the melody repeats but starting at the G. The lines of the viola and cello/contrabass are different.
Thanks for your comments @meastrowick and @jawoodruff! I will explore this further. It was an experiment, a free exploration. I realised it needs more boundaries and the suggestion of jawoodruff ( Explore strident tonal relationships) is a great way to do so. Thank you! You might see more of this 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...