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pete smith

Introduction & Allegro for Violin

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Hi.

This is my composition for A-level music and I was wondering if anyone could give me a predicted grade and give me any feedback on my work so that I can up my grade. Any feedback would be much appreciated.

Edited by pete smith
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Good work. The rhythm at the start of the Presto is especially nice. Just why you label a "Presto" movement "Allegro" is beyond me: Either it's "Allegro" or "Presto" ;-)

More to the point: The score would be more readable if you mark the introduction as g minor, the Allegro as e flat major, which are their keys, the many modulations notwithstanding. You have to be careful that the violin doesn't get drowned out by the piano. Often, the violin is just overpowered by those massive chords. Different dynamics for violin and piano can help a bit, or scoring for more than one violin, or thinning out the piano texture. Also, I would advise you to check with a violin player if the part is actually playable. Rapid changes from pizzicato to arco, double stops, two melodies at once (m. 21ff of the Presto) all look challenging.

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Thank you for the comments. The structure of the piece is an Introduction and Allegro, therefore, Allegro is not the tempo that is why it has been marked Presto.

Also, I have had the violin part checked by a violinist and it is actually playable but unfortunately it is not played by him here but rather by Sibelius so the contrast between parts sounds very unnatural.

Thanks again I will see if I can make some improvements.

 

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I see where you are coming from. Yes, in English, sonata form is sometimes called "Sonata Allegro form" or something like that, which isn’t usual in my language. But generally, a piece called "Allegro" bears this name because its an piece in Allegro. If you look for instance in the music book of Mozart’s sister (http://dme.mozarteum.at//DME/nma/nma_toc.php?vsep=201), some pieces are called “Allegro” lacking a better name, but they are of course to be played in the tempo of “Allegro“. Other pieces are called "Andante" (like no. 37 & 38 in the mentioned music book), one even “Presto“ (No. 43). I could come up with examples of other sources as well. Funny tidbit: In German, “Allegroform“ is a linguistic term, meaning how a word sounds if spoken very fast, and has nothing to do with musical forms.

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