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This is a piece I wrote last week. I have separated the ‘movements’ by one measure long rests, and I understand if that may seem a bit too long; I have made them shorter in my more recent pieces.

The reason I named it “Try, Try Again” was because the second and fourth movements reminded me of someone making a mistake whereas the other movements sounded like someone achieving or succeeding. I also included a quote on the last page of the score that I felt went along with the title of the piece.

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Also, I forgot to mention that I was having a bit of trouble with Finale playing the first and second endings in movement two so if you see that in the score but don’t hear it played back that is why.

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musically beautiful. If you are going to double the sounds, you probably don't need that much instrument ? or you can use the 3's and 6's in other instruments. The piece you wrote can be easily arranged for flute and piano.but this is your choice, just a little advice. it is also nice this way. 

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It sounds to me like this is mostly diatonic.  Changing up the harmony a bit aside from the chords you seem to get from just staying to the key signature would add more depth to your music.  I don't know if this is too easy or too hard for you but check out this video:

 

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On 7/12/2020 at 12:27 PM, Monarcheon said:

Why is that a problem?

 

I would say that staying diatonic restricts your tonal language and thereby restricts your ability to convey meaning, unless you use it intentionally as a device, for example at the end of a piece or in a finale in which staying diatonic conveys a sense of solidity in the key. It is by no means bad to stay diatonic but it opens up a world of possibility-SONATA FORM, among many other things-expressively and compositionally. 

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19 minutes ago, wesleymiller said:

 

I would say that staying diatonic restricts your tonal language and thereby restricts your ability to convey meaning, unless you use it intentionally as a device, for example at the end of a piece or in a finale in which staying diatonic conveys a sense of solidity in the key. It is by no means bad to stay diatonic but it opens up a world of possibility-SONATA FORM, among many other things-expressively and compositionally. 

 

I don't know why sonata form is something to be necessarily sought after...

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10 minutes ago, Monarcheon said:

I don't know why sonata form is something to be necessarily sought after...

 

It's an excellent way to learn as a developing composer. It also provides a nice dramatic structure 

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