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Found 95 results

  1. Fin.mp3 A short piece intended for film
  2. This is a violin and piano accompanist piece that is made to depicted snowfall and anything related to snowflakes. You should be able to hear this and enjoy the piece too.
  3. A short piece for violin and piano 🙂 Sounds very classical. I also got a little limited by my poor knowledge of keyboards… One has to practice … 😉
  4. Seni-G

    Romance

    What can I say about love? It never turns out quite the way we expect. Then again neither does life. The years stack up, and the weight of all that time compacts our experiences, until we are forged into something new, like metamorphic rock. A good marriage has the same effect. As the years pile up, any cracks that once existed between us are compressed, our minds and outlooks are reformed, until after a while we have been reshaped, remade together. This music chases love, chases life. It races ahead, keeps the fire lit. It’s hunting, sniffing something out, hungrily searching through the night. The years fly by, but the fire stays lit. It’s a dance, a celebration, though a frenetic one. While you listen, stomp your foot! How about one loud clap! Why the hell not! I have a limited vocabulary for describing how it feels to experience love, real love, so I have to compose instead, to try and capture the uncapturable. This music gives just a taste of that. Love has many flavors, and this is one flavor I’ve tasted, and I want to share the feeling with the world. It may not always be pretty, but it tries hard to live passionately, to expresses itself freely, to communicate something meaningful. It doesn’t give up, even when challenges arise. It reaches out to feel a connection. It aches for it. I have experienced this love. In fact, I experienced it today, while watching my wife walk across the room. Sometimes my heart starts pounding for no reason, and this music appears inside my brain. Makes me want to spin around and around, until everything is blurry. The life we have built, the family we created, the years and shared experiences and adventures are all stacking up before me, until all I can do is marvel at the structure. Keep living! Keep love in your heart, and share it with someone whenever possible. Stomp and dance and spin. And also, lay silently on your bed in the afternoon with the person you love, and watch the sun’s rays poke through the blinds. Compare the sizes of your feet, tell a silly story, share what’s in your heart. Grow together, always growing.
  5. The piece begins with a cadenza and then transform into a beautiful piece about the line between life and death. You should hear the voices of past people as this piece grows. There's much more I have to add to this, but for a start, I'm happy with it.
  6. Hey gang, I posted this piece earlier when I was in the middle of writing it. Here is the finished product. This is the piece I composed over the spring semester during my first semester of composition lessons at the university I am attending. Please enjoy and let me know what you think! (P.S. Evidently when you use Petrucci font in Finale, the tremolo stops working, so that's why it appears in the score, but is not in the MP3 [do the midi problems ever end...?])
  7. Guten Tag! This is one of the projects I have been working on this semester! Feel free to check out the concept behind it at this blog post: Composition Notebook: "Morning Birds" - the story. What I am attaching for ya'll is the full score (which includes the cues for the three different flute parts, but not the actual parts), one of the flute parts (so you can see what they look like), a MIDI rendering of all the orchestra and flute parts combined, and a MIDI rendering of just the orchestra part (Titled "Three Violin Version..."). One of the flaws of the combined MIDI file is that the flute parts are made up of several short fragments/'bird calls',as you will see in the attached flute part, and the players will be improvising which bird call they play when. In other words, it will be a much more organic process than a computer just playing them all in order, as happens in the recording. I think the MP3 of everything combined sounds pretty terrible and clamorous which is not at all the intent of the piece. I suspect that this chaos will be lessened considerably when real players are performing this. If anyone has experience writing this sort of thing, I would really appreciate any advice you'd have to offer. Also, I am happy to hear comments from anyone about this piece, whether they be about the orchestral writing, the special effects, or anything else. Thank you and enjoy!
  8. Hello everyone. I'm new to this forum but i'm hoping i can get some much needed help. I recently started working on my very first musical composition and it has multiple sections. The "B" section is a Waltz that preferably needs to be in E Minor. I've never written a Waltz or Classical music in general. so it would be much appreciated if i could have some ideas on how to take it. Thanks, Weston
  9. Hey there, Here is another piece which I have been working on this semester! I really need to come up with a fun title, so if anyone has any ideas, please share! Also, I am happy to hear any comments on this work. It is in four movements, and I hope that you enjoy each of them (my personal favorite is the third one - 'Largo').
  10. This is my first attempt to write a piece for unaccompanied violin. I'll try to make a recording in nearest future
  11. My master's degree is starting to draw to a close, and I'm very aware that every piece I write now will be one of the last while I still have my tutor. For that reason, I've really tried to push myself beyond my current boundaries wherever possible. This piece, while not incredibly 'contemporary' sounding I suppose, in some ways represents the culmination of my efforts and explorations while at this institution. I've pushed my harmonies and chord progressions as far as I'm personally willing to right now, and also used some new string techniques that I'd not really explored before. Some of this piece, especially the second half, is definitely among my favourite music I've ever written. I've still kept to my usual style of working with very short bits of material and seeing where I can take them, but this piece is roughly divided into three or four smaller sections which have their own separate ideas as well. I've also become very interested lately in sounds that 'morph' over the course of a single note. Usually, that just means fading multiple instruments in and out on the same note. I feel that this is an area that isn't adequately explored in a lot of the more widely played contemporary repertoire, especially in more amateur-aimed music. This piece will be performed at the start of May by a professional ensemble (including a very skilled concert pianist, fortunately). It'll be conducted, which is why I put the piece in this section. I've put it on Soundcloud as well if that playback is working better than this site for whatever reason. There's a couple of really minor changes between the score and the recording, because once you start polishing the score in Sibelius you often kind of ruin the playback.
  12. @ComposerMITA wrote a piece a few weeks ago based on a concept of lines which function relatively independent of one another and which also change 1) tonal centers and 2) modes every couple measures. It sounded like an interesting experiment, so I thought I'd give it a whirl. I-dunno, I don't hate it exactly, but it sits with me the same way that free jazz and 12-tone music do. *shrug* It's definitely a good exercise in modes, in part writing, and in trying to make each line work on its own regardless of the others. The original project requirements call for no thought given between the lower two voices and the upper two voices, but I must admit to breaking that a little - if it was possible and convenient to the line, I definitely gravitated towards tones that worked relatively better with the other parts! Viola! - erm, I mean VOILA - c'est mon "chef d'oeuvre". Gustav
  13. Audio: Allegro.mp3 Score: Allegro TOTALLY DONE.pdf The date was September 24, 2006, my 22nd birthday. Erica and I decided to have a picnic in Meadow Park, share a bottle of wine, and take a nap. It was during this wine-induced nap that somebody walked into our house, in the middle of the day no less, while we slept peacefully in the bedroom, and stole my laptop. This particular laptop happened to contain all the music I had ever written up to that time. Was it backed up somewhere? Of course not. After all, my laptop had never been stolen before, so why would I need to back up everything I'd ever created. Nope, it was all right there, and someone stole it right out of my house in broad daylight. I never saw it again. The thief did not take our DVD player. He did not take our television. He did not take my car keys or the stereo either. He didn't even take the laptop's power cord. Just the laptop. And of course my very reason for living. When I awoke from my cat nap, it took me a good half hour to realize the laptop was gone. I won't try to put into words what went through my head except to say this: all of my art was destroyed that day. I had no website, no hard drive, no printed copies. I felt like a victim of fire. I was completely alone with my grief. Ok I was able to salvage a couple things. While ravaging through my belongings looking for any sheet music I could find, I miraculously discovered some printed pages stuffed down into a drawer. The pages were the original versions of what would later become the third and fourth movements of my first piano sonata. I was also able to copy down from memory the scraps that would later become the last movement of my first string quartet. Other than those tidbits, everything else was taken forever. My entire career as a composer up to that point was a blank page. I'm not sure how long I waited until I tried to sit down and write something again. Maybe a month. Whenever it was, when I sat down in front of that blank page, I actually felt very free, despite my sadness (and rage). It was as if all my musical baggage had been tossed unceremoniously in the trash can. Whatever genre I had been trying to fit into, whatever musical puzzle I had been wrestling with, whatever inadequacies I felt about my completed work - they were all completely moot now. I was born anew. So I sat down and wrote a violin sonata. I had never written for the violin before, but my approach was to write as if the instrument could do anything I wanted it to do. I wrote that way for the piano too. No more feeling constrained by my own lack of pianistic ability. I put on that page whatever I damn well felt like. It felt good. And somehow, despite all the pain, the music was chipper. Even at my darkest moments, my music comes out chipper. Maybe it's just who I am, or maybe that's how I cope. My brain might feel all doom and gloom, but my music is sunshine and rainbows. This first movement is the first piece I wrote after my babies were taken from me. I completed the movement in March of 2007. It is very much a classical piece, straight up sonata form, repeat bar and everything. It might not be genre shattering, but it was a very open and freeing experience for me to write it. It's what I was feeling at the time. It's what had to come out.
  14. Hi everyone, I am starting to plan my next symphony, for a standard orchestra. I am having trouble with knowing what difficulty to make the second violin parts. The 1st violins play semiquaver triplets, with 6 to a beat at 90MM (ish.) I have been told this is okay for 1st Violin, but should I give a part of this speed to the 2nd violin/viola? The other thing I thought of doing was dividing the sections, and having the other half play pizzicato on every quaver. Would doing this cause the strength and resonance of the strings to be lost under the winds?
  15. This is my first piece in italian style and generally my first concerto (I don't think it's succesful), I write mostly solo music. What do you think? What do I have to improve?
  16. Perendinare is a latin word that has no representation in Spanish. It means: "to leave something for the day after tomorrow".
  17. This is an original composition by me Christian "Cj" Rhen featuring flute, clarinet, trumpet, violin, cello, and piano. This will be performed at various events and professionally recorded by me for competitions and college apps. Tell me what you think. Instagram is @wind_player1
  18. This is my Soliloquy for Violin No. 31. Here is the link to my previous soliloquy for violin: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t35725/soliloquy-for-violin-no-30/
  19. I wrote a piece for accompanied violin. It is mostly melodic. Roberto Zini - Elegia Violinistica I hope it is interesting.
  20. I went over this piece once a teacher I had (on counterpoint) told me I should notate the different tempi for each instrument. What do you think? The world of polyrhythm-polytempi is wide. This is a canon in prolatio where every line is the same at different ratios.
  21. Hi! I am a 12-year old boy that likes to compose music. This is my first string quartet. It is written for two violins, viola, and a violoncello. I hope you will like it. Feel free to leave your opinions in the comments - every feedback means a lot to me.
  22. Very happy to share the recording of one of my recent pieces, "Your room at midnight" for solo violin. I hope you enjoy it and feel free to tell me your honest feedback guys. Your room at midnight (soundcloud) * I'll share the score if someone is interesting!
  23. Okay so here's my first kind of 'major' piece I've written for my degree. It'll be performed by a professional ensemble in May, and I'm sending off the score this week. The brief was to write a piece of maximum length 12 minutes, for an ensemble of maximum size flute/clarinet/perc/2 violins/viola/cello/bass. After a bit of agonizing over what on earth I would do, I did what usually works for me and just sat down and put some notes out to see what happened, and then went from there. The piece is kind of loosely following around a character as he explores a world. I haven't put too much more thought into the precise story than that, except that the first movement is introducing the character, and the second and third are two little adventures of his, with the third ending in his triumphant return. I kept a fairly light tone throughout, which seems to be a common thread for all my compositions. Some of my tutor's suggestions that I put in were expanding the first movement slightly, experimenting with string harmonics, and just some general score tidying. He liked the ending and I do too - his comment was that it sounded like something a composer might have written a hundred or so years ago, but in a good way. The piece is fairly tonal, almost to a fault at times, so mostly my concerns were with trying to keep it as fresh and interesting as I could, in my own ways. Mainly, that involves trying to vary up my chord progressions and harmonies. I had particular fun towards the end of the second movement where I literally was just putting in whatever I felt like in the strings. The title has no significance whatsoever, except that I wanted it to evoke something childlike and innocent. I originally had 'Tinky-Winky' instead of 'Timmy' but my tutor thought that was going too far, and it would seem like I was going for a jokey piece, which was not quite my intention. Recording is a slightly dodgy/quirky/stuttery Sibelius output but it's mostly okay.
  24. Here is a violin duet that I have written.
  25. This is a work I've been looking at on and off for a few months now. It began its life as the opening few bars in my head for a week until I wrote them down. I decided that I wanted to try and write a very light-hearted and maybe (hopefully) occasionally humorous piece, while still keeping it interesting and musically varied. It's quite clearly very 'Candide'-inspired, but I tried to take it in my own direction as well. I'm also using this piece for another subject at uni, where I have to write an essay about some aspect of critical practice, and I'm talking about humour in music in general, and what my approach has been towards composing this piece. I'm happy to share the essay once I finish it in a week or two, if anyone would be interested in it! There are still a few notation issues to work out before I can submit it as part of this year's composition portfolio for my degree, such as the pedal lines, but now that the music is basically complete I wanted to share it with people anyway. I've also got a soundcloud link if people prefer that player - https://soundcloud.com/fotytoo/serious-music-for-violin-and-piano/s-Howou.
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