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Found 66 results

  1. Okay so here's my first kind of 'major' piece I've written for my degree. It'll be performed by a professional ensemble in May, and I'm sending off the score this week. The brief was to write a piece of maximum length 12 minutes, for an ensemble of maximum size flute/clarinet/perc/2 violins/viola/cello/bass. After a bit of agonizing over what on earth I would do, I did what usually works for me and just sat down and put some notes out to see what happened, and then went from there. The piece is kind of loosely following around a character as he explores a world. I haven't put too much more thought into the precise story than that, except that the first movement is introducing the character, and the second and third are two little adventures of his, with the third ending in his triumphant return. I kept a fairly light tone throughout, which seems to be a common thread for all my compositions. Some of my tutor's suggestions that I put in were expanding the first movement slightly, experimenting with string harmonics, and just some general score tidying. He liked the ending and I do too - his comment was that it sounded like something a composer might have written a hundred or so years ago, but in a good way. The piece is fairly tonal, almost to a fault at times, so mostly my concerns were with trying to keep it as fresh and interesting as I could, in my own ways. Mainly, that involves trying to vary up my chord progressions and harmonies. I had particular fun towards the end of the second movement where I literally was just putting in whatever I felt like in the strings. The title has no significance whatsoever, except that I wanted it to evoke something childlike and innocent. I originally had 'Tinky-Winky' instead of 'Timmy' but my tutor thought that was going too far, and it would seem like I was going for a jokey piece, which was not quite my intention. Recording is a slightly dodgy/quirky/stuttery Sibelius output but it's mostly okay.
  2. Four Short Movements

    Hey everyone! It's been a very long time! I first joined here around a decade ago, and never stopped composing! I've since moved to Sweden from the US, and am studying composition at a conservatory here. I wanted to share my first big project from last term, where we were to compose for a chamber ensemble of fantastic musicians (Norrbottens NEO, in case you're interested). As first years, we weren't on their actual recital and were encouraged to write music as difficult as we wanted and try new things. Unfortunately, their percussionist was ill on the day of the rehearsal/recording, and we only had about an hour each to rehears and record, so it didn't turn out as great as I had hoped. It was still an awesome learning experience, and given a few more hours of rehearsal I'm sure it would have turned out great. In lieu of that, I'll attach both the midi and the recording, as well as the score. The ensemble is for flute, clarinet, violin, viola, cello, piano, and percussion. Instead of writing one piece, I decided to write four short movements, each one exploring a different idea. The first two are played as one, and explores some cool scales (double harmonic major as well as a fully diminished locrian), the third movement deals with time signatures/rhythm (and, seeing how the percussionist that was there that day was sight reading, I think he did fantastic), and the fourth movement was to see how much I could have acoustic instruments sound like synthesizers in a dubstep-like movement. Obviously it's a finished piece, but any and all feedback would be welcome! I hope to be posting here more and getting to know the new people as well as catching up with the old ones :D
  3. hi, I'm new here in this forum and that's my first publish here. This piece is called "Take it Easy ". it's electronic chill music with piano and saxophone. Tell me what do you think!
  4. Two pieces for violin and piano

    Here they go. Take One Partitura completa (1).pdf Take Two Partitura completa (1).pdf
  5. The Butterfly Dance

    This is a violin duet that I have written. I found the first four bars written down while looking through my manuscript paper on New Year's Day and I decided to extend it. This is written for two violins so that I can play it with my grandad. Sorry for the bad audio quality, it is a recording of me playing it on the keyboard.
  6. These are my "Three Sententiae for Violin, Op. 300". Opus 300 being a significant landmark to reach for any composer, I had hoped to mark the occasion with a special post and had offered the pieces to a violinist to perform and record them so that I could post that recording. However, due to various reasons, that hope hasn't materialized. So here is the MP3 of the computer version and the score. I hope you enjoy listening to them. And Happy New Year 2018 to everyone!
  7. Miniature for String Quartet

    A piece I wrote one day during the summer holidays. https://youtu.be/IPhrPxi4l8Q
  8. Hi everyone, Here's a short piece for piano trio I wrote over the summer. Let me know what you think and things I should keep in mind for future pieces. A clearer PDF score is attached below. Thanks! J Shu
  9. Butterfly Duet- my first composition

    What are your thoughts? I would greatly appreciate any feedback, but please be gentle; this is my first time. I am thinking about turning this sketch into a quartet with complete movements. Any advice on how one goes about doing this? Also, how can I make it more modern sounding while still having a light and joyful emotion at the beginning? thanks, NMM
  10. Soliloquy for Violin No. 30

    This is my soliloquy for violin No. 30. Here is the link to my Soliloquy for Violin No. 29: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t34240/soliloquy-for-violin-no-29/
  11. Trio for Violin, French Horn and Piano

    A very short piece (I'm wondering if I could make it longer) for Violin, French Horn and Piano.
  12. Totoro's Forest

    Hello everyone, So this is the first piece I'm uploading in this forum. I tried to capture different parts of the Movie: Tonari no Totoro (My Neighbor Totoro), such as the general setting in the beginning, the soft rain that gets stronger and stronger, the appearence of this creepy cat-bus and finally the happy ending. Sheet in PDF is applied as well PLease enjoy and be honest ;)
  13. Violin Positions

    How easy is it on a violin to change between non-consecutive positions e.g. 3rd to 7th? Would this be necessary to do on a violin?
  14. Birthday Duo

    Hello, I composed this little piece in response to a challenge on the forum to write for a combination of two instruments based on your birthday date. At the same time, I used this piece for an exercise, I gave myself: write a piece in less than 15 minutes. My combination was the Violin and the Horn (in F). I tried to keep the atmosphere very light, yet interesting. The music has to be funny, because it is a 'birthday song,' so therefore the Allegro scherzando and no very heavy harmonies. Sharing your thoughts is very appreciated! Maarten
  15. Seeking Redemption

    I apologize for the quality. Unlike my other pieces whereas I wore studio grade headphones (which died on me after six years) I am now limited to ear buds, so mixing was an issue for me. There's so many sound flaws here I'm embarrassed to even upload this. You can barely hear the choir, the flute fades in and out, the clarinet can't be heard, and you can't even hear the viola or cello...ugh.
  16. Strings on Violin and Viola

    Does the G string of a Viola have the same timbre as the G string of a Violin?
  17. Hello everybody, As a wind player, I can easily compose compositions for wind instruments, because I know how they are played and I have experience with playing saxophone, which is actually a combination of all woodwinds. My woodwind writing is fluent and almost without any mistakes. Orchestration for woodwinds is very easy for me. Writing for the string family is a different story, because I have never played one of the string familiy members nor do I have any friends who play such an instrument. I realize that reading books and videos on the internet about how to write for string instruments will not help me very much. String writing is a very different concept than wind writing and because I want to become familiar with the string family and in order to write high quality string music, I am thinking about taking lessons with a violin teacher. Do you have any advice for me? Is it worth learning the Violin (or one of the other string members) in order to understand the instrument and how to write for it? The string instruments are next to the piano some of the most important instruments in (classical) composition. I am looking forward to your response! Maarten
  18. This piece here, despite the timing and the name of the piece, has nothing to do with the solar Eclipse this year. This piece was actually written back in 2012, and I've recently remastered it. It was wrote back when I was still very much into the ponies, and was actually inspired by Luna. The intro is meant to be grand, and fade into a sense of regalness while still keeping a dark undertone, signifying Luna's dark past. This piece starts off in f# minor, and then hits a mood change and goes to A Major in measure 82 until the last segment of the piece which is a modified version of the melody used from the center. This will be track number 8 on "Dust of the Past" when it is released.
  19. Help with String Quintet

    Hello, I'm new to this site. I only got into music about 3 years ago (I'm 19 now) and I need help because this is my first composition. So I understand most musical jargon, but I'm wanting to study Composition next year at a Music Conservatorium. Constructive feedback would be awesome! I know the piece isn't perfect which is why I need help!
  20. String Quartet

    hello, This is my new string quartet composition. Just listen, and share your opinion! Thanks! :)
  21. Larghetto

    Larghetto explores the possibility of mingling the old styles with the contemporary twists.
  22. Sonatina for Violin and Piano

    A chiefly didactic piece for a Grade V violinist with accompanying piano.
  23. Divertimento a 3 in F, for 2 Violins and Violoncello I. Allegretto grazioso (3/8) II. Andante (2/4) III. Allegro giusto, alla breve (cut time) Composed: 2011 Style: Classical, circa 1790 This work is the first of two such divertimenti for this instrumentation I have composed to date, the second of which having been written and posted here just recently. I consider it one of my more charming and attractive works – a personal favourite – and among my most ingenious, a tour de force of development and counterpoint (of which I am very proud) without being obvious about it. One hardly realizes that motives are continually being developed throughout both the first and second movements, in as unassuming a manner as possible. It is in three movements, and lasts 10-½ minutes. Description: The first movement (Allegretto grazioso), in Sonata-Allegro form, opens with a lilting, graceful theme of rising steps that ascend the scale in slurred pairs, followed by a series of descending scales in skittering triplets, and a few “sighing” gestures, that together I feel form one of my prettiest melodies. From it are then extracted the following three discrete motives that are developed almost constantly throughout the movement: The playful second theme contrasts with the elegance of the first before a pair of turns and a florid cadence transform it into something more refined. The development section further explores the possibilities of the various motives around a central sequence, and culminates in a rising and falling series of coupled steps (motive 1) on a pedal tone that brings the music to a very satisfying return of the opening theme in the recapitulation. The second movement (Andante), in binary form, is in the subdominant key of B-flat, and opens with a coquettish theme from which, as in the first movement, are extracted the following two discrete motives that are developed elsewhere in the movement: This theme is then repeated in the tonic minor, and through a surprising modulation makes its way to the movement’s dominant key of F. There is no second theme per se, but rather a contrapuntal development of the foregoing motives. The third and final movement (Allegro giusto, alla breve) is a rollicking, rather wacky fugue (how often does one hear those words together?) on a jaunty subject, beginning on a syncopation, and characterized by an unexpected, dissonant suspension, accented sforzando for humourous effect. The bass line to the subject, introduced in the ‘cello, is worked canonically into the entire exposition as if it were a second subject; hence the exposition functions much like a double fugue, though it doesn’t continue that way. I didn’t take the construction of this fugue too seriously (this was not a counterpoint exercise in earnest), being more interested in keeping it light and quirky; and although the subject begins on the fifth degree of the scale, I decided against the pedantic complexity of devising a tonal answer in the exposition – though otherwise it proceeds conventionally for the most part. Passing dissonances run rampant, and transitions and modulations are often purposely abrupt, taking unexpected turns intended to raise eyebrows, and a smile or two. After a final sequence on a pedal tone and a truncated statement of the subject, even though it feels like the movement should continue, in a rush it throws itself headlong to a sudden, crashing finish as if it hit a brick wall at a run. This is probably the oddest piece of counterpoint I’ve ever written, but I feel the jocular treatment of what is usually by its nature a serious form contrasts well with the sunny warmth and charm of the previous two movements. Premiere: This work was premiered in July 2016 by members of the Octava Chamber Orchestra, a community orchestra in the Seattle, Washington area, as part of a unique concert of Baroque and Classical music by living historicist composers. Although I regret I could not attend the performance, I did receive the recording of it that I have posted here below. The outer movements are played a bit too slowly, and there are some mistakes and inaccuracies; but I’m gratified that the players took the piece seriously and made a sincere attempt at a sensitive interpretation. Overall, it’s one of the better performances I’ve ever received, and I’m quite pleased (to say nothing of being honoured, and very fortunate). Musicians’ and Audience Feedback: My contact with Octava, who played 2nd Violin at the premiere, told me that the musicians loved the piece. Though they found it somewhat challenging here and there, they said it was well written for the instruments and a real pleasure to play, just as I had hoped; divertimenti are supposed to be fun! It was the first work on the programme, and was very warmly received by the audience. Thank you for your kind attention, and enjoy!
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