Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/01/2020 in Posts

  1. Yesterday I was hearing some Beethoven sonatas and I got inspired to write that short piece. It has a ABA' form. A in EbM, B in Ebm and quite contrasting in character. A' is a repetition of A but with triplet accompaniment instead of eighth notes. I have two questions: No idea about the name. Any ideas? Are there parallel 5ths on mesures 73-74? It looks like, but the passing note G creates a sense of different harmony, though it's in a weak beat. I could change the "tenor" line to avoid that, but I wanted to have the same notes before the deceptive cadence as on mesur
    4 points
  2. Here is my first symphony. I wrote it last month in the style of second half of XVIII centuries. I analize some Haydn and Mozart early symphonies to grab some ideas and make it coherent with that period, regarding form, time signatures, tempos and so on. It has four movements: Adagio-Allegro (4/4) Andante (2/4) Minuet (3/4) Presto (3/8) Duration: 20-21 minutes Adagio-Allegro Introduction in Dm->Am->Dm (Adagio). Allegro in sonata form theme A in DM theme B in AM. Development: first section based in theme A, second section
    4 points
  3. Possibly, but I was thinking it could be a bit more open-ended than a strict theme-and-variations piece (which we did as a competition theme a few years ago, except in that one, everyone chose their own theme). Like composers could feel free to add themes of their own to the music, and use the provided melody / fragment as a starting point. @Ivan1791 also mentioned a competition based on the seasons. I can add that topic to the list, if there are no objections. I'm also with you on the question of the ensemble. I don't think it is a great idea in general to put specific restrict
    3 points
  4. I like this idea of a more "absolute" music theme. Maybe restrict the overall form of the piece (sonata, rondo, etc.). Another idea is to have an orchestration challenge. Start with a piano reduction or something that's in only a few staves, and have the competition be to expand to a larger ensemble. The instrumentation could be either defined, or up to the contestants.
    3 points
  5. This piece was written to cope with the passing of a dear friend struck with covid, a young person whose loss will linger with her family and friends forever. There was a hope she might survive but alas, didn't. It was played (in the form posted here) at her funeral. Under ordinary circumstances it might seem over sentimental - and probably is - not like my usual compositions at all. But it had to be as it is. I posted it here because it would probably need a conductor to manage the tempo changes. For an orchestra of muted strings (aside from a brief solo)
    3 points
  6. I will say that I think the orchestration idea may be better suited to the "Challenges" section of the site, rather than being the theme of a seasonal competition, since it's less subjective and more technical than pure original composition of new music. Like folks could just post pieces they think would be fun to orchestrate in the "Challenges" section and have people submit their efforts in the thread. Just my take on that, though
    2 points
  7. Thanks for your guy's help on this.
    2 points
  8. Hey all Here's a simple thing I cooked up, not sure what to do with it. My first reaction is to have what I'm showing be the end little solo, and proceeding that I would have a more song oriented structure. I'm thinking like the studio version of Little Wing by Hendrix or like Freebird by Skynyrd. Both have a song format with a solo after. I'm shooting for under 4 minutes, any thoughts?
    2 points
  9. There's also the idea of having everyone compose a piece based on the same short (or not so short) melody.
    2 points
  10. One of the themes could be to write something about an ancient culture such as the Aztecs, the Mayans, or the Egyptians (although I know that last one is done a lot).
    2 points
  11. Here my new piano piece in Romantic style. Does a Bagatelle fit with the character? I'm not sure of the title. Any feedbacks are wellcome.
    2 points
  12. Hello everyone, Again, it's been a while since I have posted anything, and I figured I might as well post something I'm currently working on, my Piano Quartet no. 2. The complete work is almost done, and will hopefully be out soon. The performance is at the Ameropa International Chamber Music Summer School in Prague, Czech Republic. As usual, I'm playing the piano part. I apologize about the poor quality of the recording. I hope you all enjoy, and happy holidays, everyone! 🙂
    2 points
  13. Actually had some time at school to listen and look. It seems fine to me, even the low quick staccato. A normal bassoonist should be able to play it. Should...
    2 points
  14. Ironically I am switching gears after this piece (I am kind of sick of writing variations now LoL) and hopefully writing something for a larger ensemble. You're totally right. The dynamics I did indicate are mostly there for the sake of balance and letting the players know the most important line in any given variation. The one exception is VIII but for some reason the crescendos and decrescendos didn't get recorded in the mp3. I don't know why but sometimes, MuseScore is finnicky about actually performing those. I didn't think of that. I was going to retort that under usua
    2 points
  15. Very nice Guillem, excellent effort here. There is a lot of music here to look at to critique, though it sounds great. I know of a few early symphonies of Haydn, and of course Mozart and can see your choice of orchestration is consistent at least for the minuet. I am now tempted to try the same myself, though no doubt would take me a long time! Best Markus
    2 points
  16. Hi everyone! I just found out about this forum and I knew I just had to join. This one's a few months old now, but I am quite happy about it (as a piece more than as a fugue). I would appreciate any feedback, as well as suggestions, criticism, anything really. Thank you all!Double Fugue in C Minor.pdf Double Fugue in C Minor.mp3
    2 points
  17. Hi all, I've not posted anything for over a year, been busy with other things, but I have also been working on my second piano concerto. I have the bones of the 1st and 2nd movements, but there is still a lot of work to do on those. I do however, have the 3rd movement finished (barring a few minor edits that might arise over the next few weeks), and so I thought I would like to share this with you all. Thanks for listening. It's a bit more modern than my first piano concerto, I wouldn´t say contemporary exactly, and like all of my work, it is a tonal, classical piece. I hope you li
    2 points
  18. Im undecided if I like this piece. I think i might hate it. The theme is quite annoying. I do like the combo of flute and cello though.
    2 points
  19. Hi! Minuets are trendy here it seems, and I've been recommended to try my hand at some. So here is a first minuet and trio for piano and flute. I feel it would be hard to dance on it, I realized I'm not very comfortable with a ternary rythm (and I forgot halfway that it was supposed to be a dance at all). The overall structure is: minuet1 - trio - minuet 1', where: minuet 1 is written in 2 parts for piano. It is made of 2 repeating sections [A] and [B-A']. A finishes on a half-cadence, B modulates and brings contrast, A' is same as A but ending on a perfect cadence the
    2 points
  20. This is another dance I found in my old archives (composed in the sequencer a long time ago). It's a Gigue which is the last dance in a traditional Baroque Dance Suite. It's usually in a fast 6/8 meter so I tried to emulate that feel. I imported the midi into MuseScore and edited the slurs and accidentals (for correct enharmonics in chromatic sections). The overall form is ternary as there's a Musette (meant to imitate bagpipe drones) couched in the middle in between the Gigue sections. This dance uses what I have heard termed "shifted tonality" - where distant key centers are juxtaposed
    2 points
  21. Hello everyone! This is an allemande in C major for solo cello that I just finished. It is my second suite dance piece for the cello (the last one was a minuet). It is in [:A:][:B:] binary form and 4/4 common time. The first part is 14 measures long and modulates from the tonic, Cmaj to the dominant, Gmaj . Part B is 22 measures long and goes through more modulations: Cmaj -> Am -> Em -> Am -> Cmaj. Any feedback or suggestion is appreciated! Hope you enjoy it and thank you for listening!
    2 points
  22. Hello! Here is a new piano sonata allegro movement that I've written during the pandemic. I'd welcome any feedback you might have. 🙂 Dan
    2 points
  23. Im enjoying composing minuets and marches for beginners on the piano. They are very simple and easy to play. The B section of this minuet is experimental for me, I've tried my hand at counterpoint.
    2 points
  24. This piece depicts a dead soul in a living body. thanks for your thoughts
    2 points
  25. Yo have to see what happens horizontally and vertically, that way the chords are complete. Have in mind that what defines a chord in this style is the fundamental and the third. The 5th is avoidable, other notes ara passing tones.
    2 points
  26. Just like I have learned in buddhism to trust teachers I should accept that here as well, you are further on the path than me and you think that so I trust you
    2 points
  27. I dig the horns and the crazy organ
    1 point
  28. Are you tired of sonata form, or whatever? Write something in some contemporary form: mosaic, rhythmic cages, golden ratio, pi number or other irrational number, graphic score, indeterminacy, prolatio...
    1 point
  29. Hey, about 5 weeks ago some friends told me about a composition contest is launched by the Xalapa Symphonic Orchestra, (Xalapa, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico) which is one of the most important and respected orchestras in Mexico, with very high level players from this country and foreigners, with an European conductor. This contest sounded like a very good chance to get a piece performed since they said not only one piece will be selected, but 8, and they are open to see the composer cataloge, anyway, I didn't delay much and started writing exactly 1 month ago, an piece in Overture for
    1 point
  30. Nice! I definitely get a baroque dance feel from this piece. The melodies are nice and catchy and you develop the motives very well. I think it works fine. An alternative I thought of would be to use the below motive in some kind of cadential form, since it's so important throughout the piece. Perhaps instead of the descending scale at m.64, insert this motive and end on the tonic? Another idea would be to end on a picardy third, since the piece has been solidly minor throughout. I also really like your counterpoint, you do a really good job passing the motives between voice
    1 point
  31. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUPc-VbKrxQ Hello everyone! Here I am again with a new chamber piece. This is the last part of a 5 movements work called "Cancoes Brasileiras" for Saxophone Quartet. I composed this piece after a trip I had to the beautiful Brazil and it's a sort of tribute to Villa-Lobos and Tom Jobim. Each movement has a really simple structure, hence the term "cancoes" (songs). This one in particular is a deconstruction of "Garota de Ipanema". I hope you enjoy it!
    1 point
  32. @GenStar Where are the solos? I agree with @Mitchell, you should have more dynamics. I did listen to the song till the end but the lack of change in dynamics/energy made the song feel longer than it actually is. I mean, every song has to give the listener's ears rest at some point. At least that's what I think. ( Other than that- great work really. If you shorten some parts and stack it all together, change dynamics etc it could fit real well as an actual song as well as background music for a game or a movie
    1 point
  33. Not much to say. Great work. I like that the essence of the main theme is not lost, but sometimes the variation goes far enough. About the "breathing" i don't think it's a bad approach. But I feel more that the works would benefit of some "rest" somewhere, Or, for example, as happens in measures 99-101, that the instruments enter one after the other. This way the texture would change some times.
    1 point
  34. Since the astrological year starts at Aries you might (or might not it's up to you) reorder your movements. In this case Libra would be the seventh sign (not the 9th as your movement is). I don't know how you should continue this piece - you wrote a pretty conclusive sounding chord at the end. Sorry if that's not much help. /-:
    1 point
  35. A work in progress. Probably will make it much much longer over time.
    1 point
  36. Great job! I would maybe call it a "Bagatelle in Eb" ... seems appropriate for the period. I also don't think the hidden 5ths are anything to worry about. I also have those in my Gigue in Eb. (-:
    1 point
  37. Thanks you Mike, I'm glad you liked it, I do appreciate it. PaperComposer, Thanks a lot for you comments, I appreciate it. I do feel there is some variety lacking in the piano developments and the cadenza could be longer as you say, take in more of the developments. Also I want to change the recapitulation a little, but I got it to a stage where I think the bones are good, and I never stop tinkering with these things, so by the time the 1st and 2nd movements are ready, it may well have changed a bit. The opening (theme) does make a return in the cadenza, but not anywhere else, I d
    1 point
  38. sound's very Beethoven-ish. I mean we can't criticize you for that. If anyone's writing a trio or quartet it'd unknowingly get "Beethovenised" (tha's my opnion.) This is a good work .
    1 point
  39. I enjoyed the piece. I would remark its strong structure and the good balance between the three instruments. I like you didn't give the piano a second role. I also noticed that E natual in some measures (50)... It is clearly a retardation, it catches my attention because it is against a second. But I don't think it sounds bad at all.
    1 point
  40. So heartening to learn you survived this wretched scourge upon us and hopefully will recover fully in time. Although I haven't caught it, I've seen the effect on others all right. The piece is rather beautiful. There's a lot of dance and light in it in spite of everything. Fragmentary themes have never worried me as I've trained myself just to listen. Even so, it makes perfectly good musical sense to me. I'm not going to dissect it - there's nothing to crit really. It is as it is and should stay a memorable work, a milestone in your recovery. Locrias hours was a little plaintive that
    1 point
  41. If you change tonality at fixed intervals (semitones, tones, minor third, major third, or tritone, to cover up the chromatic scale and back to the first tonality) you are doing multitonics, which is a technique developed in jazz. In this case going back to a Giga.
    1 point
  42. I watched the video and now that I think about it - I don't really have a very well defined concept of what shifted tonality is. When I wrote this gigue I was thinking that the constant shifts up a half step were the shifted tonality parts of it. That would certainly include Banjo Kazooie and Yookah Laylee since they frequently step up by half or whole step in their chord structures. But I no longer think that that gimmick alone is what constitutes "shifted tonality" - maybe music that takes modulation as it's norm or frequently subverts the tonic with outlandish chords is probably more aki
    1 point
  43. Very nice. I like when simple motives works nicely without extra ornamentations and that's a clear exemple of that. Also the arrangement flute-cello and the deceptive cadence to extend the closing in four extra bars feels very appropiate.
    1 point
  44. I like it! I like the variation you introduce to the melody line at meas. 23-25. And the deceptive cadence at the end that prolongs the final phrase is a nice touch!
    1 point
  45. This is great, I really enjoyed it: tasteful orchestration and nice lyrical parts passed between Bassoon and strings.
    1 point
  46. I agree with Luis here. Even contemporary music intended for listening to and attempting some kind of communication doesn't need prolonged melody. It can run on motifs or just carefully organised wadges of sound as modern impressionists might write. Doesn't mean melody is redundant. Some composers are happy enough to use it. It seems to be more essential to earlier established forms from renaissance polyphony through to the romantics. Schönberg seemed to feel its scope had been exhausted after Gurre Lieder and decided to give it a new definition. But then it continued in more popular styl
    1 point
  47. Wow, that's quite impressive. Thanks for posting!
    1 point
  48. This is incredible. Really, I love this piece it's just a great job.
    1 point
  49. I couldn't shake the feeling there was some hard-to-identify timbre in there. An organ was my closest idea, though silly in hindsight. I agree that the whole thing contributes to the impression, but I'm guessing the bassoons and flutes, maybe with somewhat sudden attack and release, contributed most. The harmonics glissandos probably add a bunch of harmonic complexity very subtly. I really dig how the timbres add up to create a whole that's much more than the sum of its parts, so I hope the tone will be at least as mysterious in a real performance.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...