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  1. A short violin tune. I tried to make it sound very-very dark this time.
    5 points
  2. Hello! I decided to write a classical mini-little piano sonatina allegro movement! I didn't use any dice or try to make the music overly complicated or anything. I was going for just a pure easy-listening simplicity and ease of playing. It's not exactly sonata form as there's scarcely a development here. There are three themes though, which come back in the home key in the recapitulation. Let me know what you think and I hope you enjoy!
    4 points
  3. Hi everyone, I'm in the process of uploading as much of my music as I can on youtube, cuz what good does it do sitting around in my computer huh? Anyway, here's my second piano sonata as it was performed in 2016. It's divided into 3 movements and all three movements are following the typical sonata-form conventions to some degree or another. It took around 4 months to write the score and around 6 months in rehearsal time to get it performed to an acceptable degree. The third movement is specially challenging, but I think it sounds cool. Either way, have fun.
    4 points
  4. I had a creativity outburst at the beginning of the pandemic, and wrote many pieces. In this it's a fanfare following a late-Romantic, slightly cinematic aesthetic, reminiscent of Korngold and Richard Strauss. When I posted this piece in another place, a player of the Sophia's Vereeniging symphonic band of the Netherlands asked me if they could play the piece, and I said that of course. There've been some rehearsals, but they had to be postponed after yet another spike in Coronavirus cases. The score can be seen here: https://albertdelaf.com/op13_en/
    3 points
  5. Sheet music seemed ok to me given it's an example. You can trim the bars at the end when ready. Point is, composing melody is so personal a thing that it's difficult to give feedback. Always easier if they have a context/a background against which they're set. I found them rather choppy and angular but a) that's just me, b) in another form they might transform to something very lyrical. I mean, just changing #2 to a legato and perhaps altering rhythm and stress makes quite a difference in mood. 'Choppy' might be what you want (a sprightly ballet scene or something) in which case fine. It might still be worth looking at traditional melody writing (if you haven't already) just to broaden your repertoire. Traditionally you'd have, say, two balanced parts, the first ending on some sort of imperfect cadence, the second on a perfect one. Also worth learning a bit about modulation as melodies usually lead somewhere which might be to a new episode/melody in a different key. Likewise you might have a surprise modulation in a melody but need to know how to get back to the home key. These things take a bit of practice across time but they come in the end. Sorry if you already know this but in case others don't.... Usually, combining melodies counts as 'development' which often needs movement around different keys. (for those who want to explore this from scratch have a look at almost any Mozart Sonata first movement or Eine Kleine. There's a further point... writing for a melody instrument other than keyboard, the harmony is implied in the melody. You seem aware of this but it's worth experimenting with greater variety in a tune like this. For example, bar 3, shift the whole thing up a minor 3rd (to A flat) then back down in bar 4 to get back in the home key. Can you forgive me quoting your tune but changed thus, as an example? Must admit I've never thought about compositional goals. It's been about self-expression above and beyond the capabilities of words and, if I get the chance, make a little money out of it with some commercial fragments or at least a decent dinner and a few beers if working with someone else for nothing! (which has little to do with self-expression but what the 'client' wants!) Cheers.
    3 points
  6. Hey everyone! I'm inviting you to check my new piano solo "Wasted Tears"
    3 points
  7. Good evening everyone, I had the good fortune of having my piano tuned for the first time in well over a year a couple of days ago. I'd almost forgotten how nice it could sound and feel! Anyways, given the wild hot/cold weather we've been having here it'll probably only last a week before keys start sticking and the action starts creaking again, so I thought I'd better take advantage of this little window of piano bliss. Here's a link to a collection of five piano character pieces. Written in late 2019, it's my most recent work, and actually the only thing I've written in the past four years or so. As one would expect from the title, these are melody-oriented and not formally complex. Hope you enjoy!
    3 points
  8. These two piano pieces were created by me back in 2014. They are some of the first pieces that have a very simple harmony, yet sound quite natural and competent. Especially in the re-recorded version, which is presented in this video.
    3 points
  9. As usual, not that I try to but it usually just shakes out this way, I'm gonna have the opinion that induces the most rage. So before we begin Okay let's do this. Firstly, I'm not actually certain that what you describe — composers and musicians not showing up to concerts — really matters. Actually, I would say it's often better if they don't. I, for one, don't actually make music for musicians to listen to; I just want normal people to like it and listen to it. But I find getting musicians to listen to new music is no problem. On these forums or whatever, I can usually expect to get a few dozen plays or something. On YouTube, some of my tracks wound up getting into the recommended feeds of normies and skyrocketed to tens of thousands of plays and hundreds of likes. I am always glad when musicians, especially ones much better than I am support what I do and like it, but it means a lot more to me when the average person, who just got off their boring, soul-crushing 9-5, stumbled upon my music, thought it was freaking awesome, and shared it with their friends because it brightened their day that much. Maybe, it even inspired them to get into composing themselves and that's even better. Then, a beginner reaches out to me via forums, email, IRL, whatever and is asking me for advice on their own stuff and how to do something. That's also humbling and good and it's actually gotten to be a bit too much this past year (which is why I'm making some online courses and prob gonna offer some skype lessons soon) too keep up with. All of that, in my opinion, is far better than musicians showing up. I played in rock bands and let me tell you something: The brutal reality of 99% of live music today falls under two categories • It totally sucks. Standards are very low. I can't tell you how many years it took before I could get to jam with a band that could actually play IN TIME with each other and would show up. I played alongside a lot of bands that just friggin' sucked, dude. They played way too loudly, too much distortion, singer couldn't sing, out of time, etc. Then, after the show they'd come up to us and be like "Hey, you guys were awesome, man!" and we'd say "Thank you" and then were always like waiting for us to say they were great too and looked disappointed when it didn't happen. It's like, well bro...I'm not gonna lie to your face and say you were amazing when you clearly bungled the song, don't know how to write a coherent piece, and couldn't even play in time with each other. If someone came up to us and said "Hey, you guys kinda sucked tonight", we were willing to be like "Yeah, it wasn't as good as it should have been". Most musicians don't have that kind of self-reflection, so what happened at virtually all of these shows, is that the "audience" was 100% "musicians". Just guys in bands that suck as bad as 9/10 of the other bands. It's a total echo chamber and "trophy-for-everyone" fest. People don't come because the bands aren't worth seeing. • Like with art galleries, there are many talented people out there. They don't get promoted though. If you have some sort of social justice message to sell, you can just literally tape a banana to a wall and they'll promote the crap out of it for purely political reasons. The guy who can actually sculpt, compose, paint, etc? Nope. Not interested. The industry is full of gatekeepers/politicians. This then harms the actually-good composers when they do get promoted, because most people just assume it's more modern-art garbage. Now I will say, I'm not entirely sure what it's like in local orchestral or chamber music "scenes" as per point 1, but I know it's true for point 2. The local orchestras near me almost never play anything by new composers and the few times they seemingly have, it was pretty much not even advertised so I never would've known about it anyway. Last point • You have a niche category of music Most people today, including musicians, outside of a film/game context, do not have any interest in orchestral music. Even I can honestly say I don't feel compelled to go watch a string quartet + winds duo. People want to have fun at concerts as much as they do hear the music. People want to dance, they want lights, they stage antics and performance, they want the social aspects of it as well as the music. Sitting silently in a cathedral or hall to listen to a cellist saw away might sound nice and have a nice atmosphere to it, but it's just not something most people are going to make an afternoon/evening out of, or certainly pay for, when there are (at least pre-2020) so many other more-fun things they can be doing. Historically, the orchestra was generally the music of rich people and to a lesser extent, churches. For the peasants, the unwashed masses, the normal people — the fiddler on the street or at your spring festival and drums is what they know as music and they'd have much rather been doing that than going to sit quietly in church and listen to a choir sing ANY piece old or new. In other words? Musicians aren't showing up to local concerts? Good. &*#@ 'em. If it's mostly musicians showing up, it means that the music is pretty bad. If you have like 40 normal people who just want to listen to music showing up to an orchestral/chamber music concert in 2021? You're doing very well, I'd say.
    3 points
  10. Hi guys! I am back from a very long hiatus on this forum! This is one of the works I composed for my music exams, please feel free to give some feedback and share some critique. Thank you! Compositional Technique used: Japanese Modes, Quartal and Quintal Harmony Pieces of Inspiration: - Gustav Holst - Japanese Suite - Toshio Mashima - Notes of Japan - Joe Hisaishi - One Summer's Day 町祭り - Festivals of a Japanese Town, Op. 11 (Draft 1) - 町祭り.mp3 町祭り - Festivals of a Japanese Town, Op. 11.pdf
    2 points
  11. Here is the first movement for a trio sonata in Emajor I am working on. Any feedback is welcomed!
    2 points
  12. He's a "moody" work ... for a contemplative day in another time.
    2 points
  13. Greetings. This is my very first post on the Young Composers community, and I would like to share one of my piano compositions that I had composed several weeks ago. This piano piece is a polonaise, which was written to imitate Frédéric Chopin's compositional style. Due to my busy schedule, I did not have the time to practice and record this piece. So instead, the audio file was exported from MuseScore 2.3.2. Any feedback would be appreciated, and I hope you will enjoy it! Carl Koh Wei Hao
    2 points
  14. Sinfonia in c major for baroque orchestra. Grave/allegro movement. Please tell me what you think SimenN
    2 points
  15. Hi, Daily I often hear music by beginners attempting to imitate the 18th century masters and its understandable, they are like heros to many musicians and budding composers. A word of caution though, it may be better to say that your composition aims to imitate the late classical style otherwise you'll create an expectation in the listener to compare your work with what they have heard from the masters themselves and this would be an unfair comparison. I think its great that you included your composition teacher's remarks and that you have shared your revised composition. Although I disagree with your teacher's appraisal that your music is 'very much in the style'. There are elements in your music that reflect your exposure and understanding of the classical style but there seems to be a lack of clear form in your pieces. There are harmonic progressions that are foreign to the period with harsh dissonance that disrupt the flow of good music that preceded it. Overall I sense a lack of structure and an ambition beyond the experience and skill necessary to pull it off. Many student composers may not be aware of the sheer volume of simple dance forms composers in the 18th century composed in order to get to grips with form, melody, and harmony. Beginning first by learning to play minuets on the keyboard as children and then composing their own after understanding the recurring patterns observed and discussed at the keyboard. I mention this because I believe in order to develop your skills as a composer its best at first not to give yourself a blank manuscript with the permission to compose whatever musical thoughts happen to arise but to begin with a chosen form that you've studied and have the self discipline to keep to otherwise the result often will be a collage of ideas that don't really achieve the effect you are looking for. Minuets are a great place to start if you want to learn the classical style, they won't give you a chance to be flashy but they will provide a disciplined approach to learning melody and harmony in order to progress to more interesting forms. Of course if you are just a casual composer and having fun with midi software and don't care for creating authentic sounding music of the period then disregard my comments. I don't mean to harsh or discouraging, I think you have great ideas in your piece and with good instruction you could channel those ideas into very listenable pieces and develop your style. I took a look at the beginning of your piece and tweaked it to be more in the style in order for you to compare. I would avoid changing time signatures and tempos during a piece when you first start out composing. Keep it simple. I changed the piece to begin on the tonic and did this for the main theme too. A simple alberti bass is a great place to start for carrying a melody in the classical style.
    2 points
  16. Hello! Very nice work! I think you have som great musical ideas. I dont know if you goal was to write at prelude/fugue or a baroque style prelude and fugue. Even so i would like to give you som pointers on fugal tecnique.I will not go over the usual stuff like voice leading and parallell octates and fifths. What i will do here is to give you some principles of fugal writing. Traditional fuges are often developed form the initial idea, and keeps to the figures and rythem from start to finish. It is offcourse possible to write contrasting sections in a fugue, but i will keep it simple here. The theme: You have a great fugal theme, it sounds baroque and has common rythem and figures. Things to pick up from the theme is: Bar 1: Downward steps (C - B - A,), Eight note rythem (5th 4th 3rd) Bar 2: 16 notes in upward and inversed motion. That means that your rythem later in the fugue should have these elements. As a said you theme is great, but also a bit difficult arranged. You start the theme with a uppbeat that goes to the 5th in you harmony. So on the first beat of the bar (the strongest beat in the enitre bar) is on the most unstable noe of the tonic triad. This also gives you a challange when the subject is going to enter in another key (you enter in the subdominant, ill come back to this later). - What you can do is to cut the upbeat and start on C. Or you can change the C from A or to F. What I would do is to start with a rest. So bar 1 would look like this: The structure and harmony: This is a three voice fugue. The voices are often in the ranges of choir voices, but in intrumental and keyboard fuges it does not have to be this way. Use the range of the instrument, but try to keep the voices in correct range. The fugal exposition is 1st entry in the tonic, 2nd entry in the dominant, 3rd entry in the tonic. Its possible to dem all directly, or to have eposides between them to set up the entry og modulate. What you do is the enter the tonal answer in the key of B flat major. Why? There is also a issue with the harmony from bar 35 - 36. Last beats of bar 35 is the dominant of F major (c major), and its expected to resolve like a cadens (either to F major or d minor). You resolve it to B flat major. So that does noe work. When you har writing tonal music like this you allways have to look at the prevoius harmony to see where can i go next. You can allways move logicaly in seconds, fourths, firths and sixths form your harmony (in both minor and major). Harmonic rytem: What you really ned to keep in mind is the harmonic rythem. The timesignature dictates this. 3/4 time The most important beats in the 1st and the 3rd. Keep the harmony clear in those beates for the most part. In bar 37. second and third beats the harmony should be F major (the dominant of the tonic at the time, b flat major). But what is the harmony here? To me it looks like b flat major in the soprano voice and f major in the alto voies. And the bar resolves to B flat major without the root note (bflat on the strongest beat). This goes for the whole fugue. Here again its very important to look at the previus cord to see where you logicaly can move (or phrase). Enry of the third voice: In bar 38 the voice does not enter with the fugue theme, why? Example of baroque fugal writing: I wrote a little expample on your theme for you to look at if you want. Its very simple counterpoint. What i have done is to keep the three charateristics of your theme present when the 3 voices are togheter. (One voice with forth notes, one voice with 16 notes. one voice with eight notes). I hope you found this helpful. And good luck with you music. You clearly have an ear for this stuff. SimenN
    2 points
  17. Sinfonia in F major - scritto a mia moglie Trine Vacation from wrok and some spare time i wrote a new Sinfona for baroque orhcestra. This time in the key of F major and dedicaed to my wife. Insted of writing full suites or momenets my sinfonias are two moment works (Grave - allegro). A slow lyrical movement with a fast fugual movement. Grave: Calm, lyrical and from my perspective romantic movement. Keeps for the most part in the clam key of F major. Allegro: Majestic theme, 4 part fugual exposition in F major. Middle section in d minor breaks up the fugue with sudden change of charachter and emotion.
    2 points
  18. Hello guys, I think I’ve finally written a complete theme. However I’ve been struggeling the last few days. This is because I am totally lost where I want to go from here. Any ideas would be highly appreciated.
    2 points
  19. I think any hobby becomes more rewarding when you have a goal to aim at. My mid term goal is to compose a piano sonata, my long term goal is to write a full scale piece for an orchestra. There are many shorter steps to take before I get there. I need to improve my harmony, learn orchestration etc. Music theory is a little like mathematics in that its best learnt sequentially, learning to count must come before learning addition and subtraction, and addition and subtraction before multiplication for example. I would highly recommend watching some YouTube videos on note value, rhythm and time signatures, then scales and key signatures. Then move on to melody writing especially the idea of the musical sentence. Learning these topics well will help you in your melody writing goal. I really like some of the ideas in your melodies and they are a great start. I took the liberty of reinterpreting the motif from your first melody into a simple sentence to give you an idea of how once you have a catchy rythm you can easily expand it once you know sentence structure.
    2 points
  20. Hello! I wanted to share with you a waltz suite I finished. I made it for a lady who really enjoys having fun, dancing, talkinig, being herself, and overall enjoys life. I will play it for her when the time comes. But for now, I will share it here. Let me know what you think! I hope you enjoy it and it makes you feel like if you were in a 19th century ball. And yes, waltz 3B is inspired by Strauss II Die Fledermaus Overture 🙂 Ps. Ignore my lame attempt in the youtube video when I tried to make a NAXOS video with that image.
    2 points
  21. Hi Jian, I'd say that 4th is dissonant considered in an harmonic superposition rather than as an interval wether it be in the bass or in the soprano. In Fig.73 b. 7 it implies a chord of Fmajor b4-5 it's actually present in the Tenor D to G 4th as a succession of two notes will be part of a lot of leaps inside a chord (from fifth to fundamental) or common chord succession (circle of fifth, cadences etc...) You won't found, however, both notes of a 4th between to voices attacked at the same time. 4th can appear in certain circumstances from passing notes and results from the incompletion of implied chords [A1]. Dissonnances will be aug4th dim5th, maj7, min7 (from memory I've never seen an interval above the octave in Baroque counterpoint or it would result from exeptionals circumstances). I'd say that, maybe not in Fux's rigorous counterpoint, aug5th is possible if resolved towards the interior of the interval [A2]. I hope it is helpful ☔
    2 points
  22. That's actually very common for sonatinas, to have more of a bridging passage in minor than a true development. Sonatina in C by Clementi for example(the very famous sonatina for beginners) has a bridging passage in the first movement that is in C minor briefly instead of a true development. Even some full sonatas(namely the Moonlight Sonata and its first movement) have a similar structure to the typical sonatina form. And you certainly met your goal. It is easily listenable, simple, but not so simple that it becomes boring, and definitely playable(I'd say it's at about the same difficulty level as the K 545 sonata, though that's just from listening).
    2 points
  23. This is a piece I wrote recently, and finally transcribed. (transcription is a work in progress). I wanted it to sort of have a story-like quality to it. Your input is appreciated I hope you all enjoy it 🙂
    2 points
  24. Hello everyone. I have felt that I should start taking the time to post some of my music on YouTube, so here is a set of four short poems for piano. Feel free to have a listen!
    2 points
  25. It's hard to speak to this without having been on the scene to see how things were marketed, but I work in the art world as well as the music world, and starting anything is always a real struggle. You have to expect it to take 3, 5, 10 years for an annual event to really take off. You have to plan to spend money on advertising and venue, and paying staff to organize everything and not let your heart break when the first few years are really sparsely attended. I just sold work at my town's brand new summer arts festival last weekend. They made a huge effort to make it worth my while to be there, because it was the first year they've tried to do this, and they knew that attendance wouldn't be great, so they provided tents and chairs to save all the artists having to set up their own, and there was free parking for artists and attendees all day, and volunteers to help you set up and pack up and to watch your work while you ran to the bathroom... and instead of charging artists a booth fee for the privilege of selling our work, the city actually paid a stipend to thank us for taking a gamble on a brand new event when we could have been somewhere else at an established event making money. So you may not have actually had a "musicians don't support new music" problem. You may have had a "this is a new event" problem. The fact that three clarinetists came from the school where someone just did a masterclass is typical. You need to find ways to create interpersonal connections like that to get butts in seats for any event, but particularly for a brand new event. Give each participating musician a fistful of free tickets to give away. Ask them what else is on their schedule for the weeks and months before the event and YOU go to THEIR events, (and deputize your planning committee members to do the same) just so you can stand up in the back of the room when the presenter asks if there are any questions and say that you just love clarinetist x, and wanted to be sure that everyone knows they will be performing again at New Music Fest next month and you'll be in the lobby with tickets later. Talk to the music departments at the surrounding universities and ask if they would like to assign extra credit points to any student who attends your event. Offer to set up a car-pool to and from the event. And remember that working musicians have lots of events to go to, because they are participating in events. I don't go to a lot of concerts because I'm busy being in the concert. I don't go to a lot of art shows because I'm busy being in the art shows. My weekends and evenings are booked between events I'm participating in and rehearsals. I have... no... time. Don't expect musicians to be the bulk of your ticket sales. You need to market your event to the general public. Pop music constantly churns out new songs and people are very excited about it. Pop music also has a massive well-tested marketing engine behind it. It's all marketing.
    2 points
  26. I think this is more the fault of a change in venue than in contemporary composers not being interested in their fellow composers work. With readily available and decently high quality renditions being produced by many composers, the need for concertizing has fallen to record lows. The only reason to get something performed live is to record it and preserve that performance for posterity. People don't see as much need to go out and listen to new compositions for these reasons. Plus they have much more of a choice over what they want to hear - the whole internet is at our fingertips and includes the very new music you're claiming is only available through new music concerts.
    2 points
  27. I agree with you that there is a sweet range for the Oboe - maybe e - d above the octave. So I concur that if I was to compose for the Oboe I would take that into consideration. However, I must again stressed that a professionally trained oboist with good technique should have little trouble attacking those low notes. Now having said that ... why make an oboists life miserable composing way down in the basement. Why, because, the weather, temperature, humidity, reed behavior ... and much more all influences your ability to play well. So at times ... what should be easy becomes more of a challenge! So I would rather not compose down there unless it really contributed to the composition. And yes, since I am a community orchestra player ... I do know that the skill levels in community orchestra vary from poor to very good and at times exceptional. The problem is more for the attack - to play softly and in pitch rather than a raucous sound.
    1 point
  28. Variations on a theme in D major in the late classical style.
    1 point
  29. Great soundtrack for a Film Noir~! You set a nice mood ... what comes next?
    1 point
  30. Yeah, the only time you can get away with not putting in any rests or breath marks or even phrasing slurs is a woodwind solo piece such as this one:
    1 point
  31. very nice piece. You are proceeding very cautiously and confidently. the ornaments in the performance add vitality to the piece
    1 point
  32. Quite inventive! You mostly do a good job of manipulating the motives and your first episode is superb! I think where this starts to suffer a bit is in the free counterpoint that you employ. I don't know if it would have sounded monotonous if you had written a similar episode to bring you to the G minor middle entry, but it seems like a better idea to continue to create interesting counterpoint using sequences based on fragments of the main motivic material. You might think that you already did that but to me it just doesn't sound as logical after the first episode. Also, it feels like you end the piece too early and force yourself to return to D minor like you were hurrying to end it. Also, I feel some discomfort about the phrase lengths you employ as well. There are ways to make phrases with an odd number of measures sound natural as well, but on the whole phrases with an even number of measures are more complete sounding. You risk making your piece sound like a note-salad when your music lacks strong cadences into the keys of the middle entries (by way of the conclusion of well constructed episodes). I'm mostly referring to meas. 10 - 18. It doesn't quite sound like an episode and it's not a middle entry which puts it in a kind of no-mans land of free counterpoint without a point. In an invention you really should take care that everything you write is either a statement of the main motif or an episode (and that the episodes use sequences to develop fragments of the main motif). I hope I have not gotten too carried away with too much advice-giving and that some of this is still helpful! It was nonetheless an enjoyable invention. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  33. The B section of the March is quite demanding to play and we decided to leave it out. I composed two other variations initially but trimmed it down. I considered leaving out repeats but I think I would have to choose either no repeats or all repeats save for the ending. My plan going forward is to compose at my own level of piano ability so that I can upload live performances. I composed a trio to my latest minuet in F and I'm trying to record me playing it; its quite a frustrating endeavour. As soon as I press record I make a mistake, often near the end which makes it worse because I was almost there!
    1 point
  34. The score-video channel thenamisgsarci just posted my Lacrimosa! Also, I am now selling a beautiful printed score of the piece, in case anyone wants to support me: https://www.dropbox.com/home/Music Renewal/Lacrimosa. Please contact me privately for more details.
    1 point
  35. I agree with Coxi in all things he mentioned. I really liked it! Great job, that you could write such an emotional piece while keeping it so simple!
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Thanks, CyberPianist. I tend to agree with you about the 3rd piece. I actually wrote that one first, after decades of avoiding solo piano music! I'm also glad people seem to be enjoying the 2nd piece, because that one took me far longer to write than the others. That one is obviously more melodic than the others, and it took a few revisions to get the piano to "sing" in a way I was satisfied with. I think I've been spoiled by writing for voices.
    1 point
  38. Very well written, played, and animated! You pack a lot of harmonic complexity into these short pieces, without ever overwhelming the listener. I felt like the 3rd one was the most harmonically adventurous, especially at the beginning. You go pretty far afield without losing any sense of tonal focus. I think your good sense of phrase structure and tension/release enables you to do this: the music is always pushing forward toward a cadence, even if we don't really know where that cadence is going to be. I don't really have any criticisms, since these pieces are short and do what they're intended to do very well--and you wrote these years ago, so maybe you're already doing things differently now anyway. Was that really animated by AI? It's amazing how well the performer's fingers and movements match the audio.
    1 point
  39. This is my first fantasy which I wrote in 2014. Here I tried to convey several states and, in the end, to channel them in a positive direction and anchor them in a life-affirming way. I also tried to give the music different contrasts, so that even with the repetition of sections in the music, there is still tension and development. I hope that these qualities, in the end, will have a positive effect on your experience of listening to this fantasie.
    1 point
  40. This piece sounds nice with good counterpoint. But I thing the flute is not in its most brilliant register.
    1 point
  41. A very nice and lively piece that reflects the classical period. has many elements that will attract the listener. thanks for sharing
    1 point
  42. great performance and piece. The melodies you put between the scales and arpeggio are passionate and romantic. thanks for sharing
    1 point
  43. I enjoyed this work very much. I with agree with the above comments that there are Spanish motifs that work well with this Tango. Thanks for sharing. I loved the inclusion of the bandoneon.
    1 point
  44. Thank you, @J.Santos! I'm glad you liked my piece! I used to write more Baroque/Classical style pieces when I was much younger. I might like to make something in a neo-Baroque style sometime, perhaps like a sort of modern retelling of it, but still remaining true to the style. I'll probably continue writing in the romantic style for now, but maybe in the near future I'll feel the need to try it out.
    1 point
  45. Incredibly beautiful, very enjoyable pieces and very well composed! I specially like the dedication, since most of my last pieces have been dedications to someone I really love. Thank you for sharing!
    1 point
  46. Thank you man, your comments are always appreciated. 🙂
    1 point
  47. An old piece I tried to update and make less messy (may or may not have worked). Any feedback would be great. Thanks
    1 point
  48. Instead of second cello or viola how about a clarinet? Nice sweet piece ... with a touch of longing.
    1 point
  49. Totally blown away by this piece, Ken! Great job! It has a very squarely, sticky rhythm, and a whimsical nature which reminds me a lot of Prokofiev - given his penchant for making his music to sound subtly funny despite all the drama, which you also show to have. It's quite a hit to quote Chopin ball's title, since this piece itself sounds a lot like it could have been heard right there if the date was a few decades later. A question. This is the very first time I see the horns below both trumpets and trombones in a score. Was this by design or by mistake? Seriously, I totally commend this work, a refreshing take that perhaps symbolizes the rebirth of the whole site. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
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