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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/10/2021 in Posts

  1. Thanks a lot PaperComposer for your comments. I agree that there are some similarities when comparing the harmonics and the kind of rag-time like rhythm, which Debussy has used in his Golliwags Cakewalk. But he was actually not the composer who inspired me to write the piece. It was Nino Rota. I suppose that this was difficult to guess. You may be right that I over-complicated some of the harmonies. I have not composed something like this before, and I agree that my writing has to improve. Thank you again for your valuable feedback! Thank you very much for y
    2 points
  2. Hi everyone, For those who don't know me my name is Camille, I'm French and I'm 17 years old. I'm familiar with classical music and orchestral litterature and I often compose for piano and orchestra. These last 3 months I composed a piano concerto in C minor. This is my big project of the moment and also the one that took me most time to compose. I create this topic to share the first movement of this piano concerto. It lasts about 17 minutes and follow a strict sonata form. I took the habit to compose a piano concerto per year and this is what I consider my most accomplished piece so
    1 point
  3. I liked this! The beginning sounded a bit familiar. i actually liked the dissonances.
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  4. Sort of ambient I guess. 99% harmonics. Oh yeah, it also sounds like it’s underwater.
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  5. This is an arrangement of Pure Imagination from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. It’s in 5/4 (besides the weird little interlude in e minor) There’s some mistakes in the recording, and I haven’t actually written most of this down yet. So a portion of this is just half-improvisation from memory. This isn’t the finished product
    1 point
  6. Hi, after having studied John Field's 18 Nocturnes, particularly his left hand patterns, I wrote a couple of short, tonal, and simple pieces However I couldn't help it, and some "more modern" harmonic changes are present. Or some kind of metric modulation. And other devices. I was interested in this composer as the father of the Nocturne.
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  7. I liked it . It was really great. Loved the spirit of the water
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  8. @YakoB Look- really, I'm not sure what you tried to achieve with the piece. To me it just screams "cliche!" which is... fine in some cases I guess. I'd try to get farther away from basic left hand patterns, all those useless octaves etc. Try to organize your melodic material better in a way that it doesn't sound like an improvisation (you know, the patterns etc.) The fact you haven't mentioned anything about what exactly it is you tried to achieve doesn't make it easier to try and guess. To me it sounds like what you'd get if you googled "emotional piano pieces" o
    1 point
  9. Hi! I was active on this forum a while back, but never in the piano music section. And I want to share this piano piece with you, just in case people have suggestions! Although I have a master's degree in composition and some success writing choral music, I've always been hesitant about writing solo piano music. So (somehow) this is my first solo piano piece (not including a couple silly ones I wrote many years ago, as a kid). My goal was to make something that sounds flashy but isn't too hard to play. So it's mostly just fast arpeggios without sudden changes of hand posi
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  10. i don’t really know what to say, besides that it was really good
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  11. If I had any comment at all it was the length of the pauses between variations that at times seemed just too long. The one at letter III seemed about right. I get the feel of what you say about repetitive but it works as it is. If it does concern you one possibility is swapping the Violin2 and Viola parts in variation 1, the Vn2 part transferred to viola an octave lower. But this was just a thought. The tempi changes otherwise avoid the feel of repetition to me, more than these are variations anyway. If you'd wanted to put one in multiple minor keys you'd have composed it that way. (An in
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  12. Thanks! I might repost this with a better recording though : P content wise, not sound quality wise.
    1 point
  13. ooooooooh I love me some I to bVI!! Nice job man! :)
    1 point
  14. It feels like I’m on the moon, staring down as the earth meets its final hours.
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  15. A children's song improvised , followed by an improvised allegro
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  16. Well, a very nice piece indeed. Modern, energetic and something to re-listen to again and again not just because the contrast in the variations sustains interest but the contrapuntal interleaving of parts suggests a listener will derive new experiences with each audition - like, notice new things. I liked the 'differential dynamics, example bar 15 and on where you're crossfading parts, dimming down one while crescendoing another. The phrasing seems excellent. Are you a string player? The vertical (spatial) layout gives the piece room to breath properly if that makes sense, no muddin
    1 point
  17. I think this is totally idiomatic. good writing for the piano. The piece is beautiful and interesting. Not anchored in old harmonies or structures. Nice that relies more in textures than in melodies.
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  18. Thanks for the suggestions! Yeah, it's always tricky deciding what to do with rhythmic momentum once you have it going, and in this one I decided to follow the post-minimalist playbook and just continue it forever, trying to vary other things (especially range and harmonic rhythm) to keep it interesting. But who knows if it works 🤔 This is actually not a live performance (and I think a sensitive performer could make the repeating 16ths more interesting!) It's the piano that comes with VSL Special Edition 1 (the newer Synchronized version), lovingly sequenced in a DAW. I've had a couple pi
    1 point
  19. A very emotive piece despite not being very tuneful. It reminds me of Ravels piano writing a little bit. I think sometimes you could have taken advantage of some kind of tuplets to give the ear a break from the constant barrage of 16th notes. A sudden increase or decrease in the rate of passing of the notes would have been welcome (which I think Ravel tends to do in pieces such as Gaspard de la Nuit). On listening a 2nd time it does seem more melodic than I first thought. Also - is this a live performance? Whoever is playing is very good! Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  20. Put the link between two brackets of the word YouTube, like this: [youtube] [/youtube]
    1 point
  21. First time writing for an ensemble this big, took a while, includes a small cello solo. Let me know what you guys think!
    1 point
  22. Same, I have not received it as well. I think @Tónskáldis pretty busy with external matters, perhaps we could give him a bit more time.
    1 point
  23. @PaperComposer Thank you! Some words about flamenco. In this style, length phrases are not regular or uniform, surely because they follow the singer, whose lines are full of melisma, hyper-rubato, breaks, etc... Flamenco es very very complex.., if you go into the pulses of the time signatures you go crazy.... Well, it takes a life to master it. On the other hand, I velive that although these pieces come straightly from dances, they take a new (cult) form when treated by academic composers.
    1 point
  24. Notturno, from the String Quartet no. 2 by Alexander Borodin. There are others I rank highly, like the 2nd movement of Tchaikovsky's String Quartet no. 1, or the opening movement of Hugo Wolf's String Quartet, or even the second movement of Rachmaninoff's String Quartet no. 2 (and of course, the classical quartets by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert), but if I'm being honest, it has to be Borodin's Notturno. The perfect balance between melodic beauty and proportion is unparalleled, not to mention being one of the most moving pieces ever written (at least in my opinion).
    1 point
  25. It may be a cliched answer, but I guess I'd say the slow movement from Beethoven's A minor quartet, Op. 132:
    1 point
  26. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axis_system
    1 point
  27. I see. Everyone, thank you so much for this. I have so little understanding of woodwinds. It does help!
    1 point
  28. I think it does in fact do a chromatically ascending whole tone trill in the very beginning just like you said. It sounds pretty cool - perfect for when the action in the movie is developing but how it will resolve is yet unclear, if that makes any sense at all.
    1 point
  29. Olov , love the suggestions . I am not the best with recording at that time and try to just capture her improvising . Super appreciate your comments
    1 point
  30. I have never heard tremolo written for a clarinet, until now! I agree with paper composer as usual.
    1 point
  31. Wow this is quite rich harmonically! You create an otherworldly atmosphere here with the polychords and glissandi you employ. I feel like I've been transported to this Carcosa you mention. It doesn't creep me out though - just a mysterious feeling. I think this recording is quite good despite the difficulties you mentioned. Maybe someone with more experience with mixing might find more to criticize on that front but I enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  32. I used to play Clarinet and I personally would probably have a hard time executing some of the tremolos and repeated notes like you have in meas. 30. The tremolos would obviously have to be triple-tongued (EDIT: they could also be double-tongued which might make things easier) which would put a slight stress on the beginning of every group of three repeated notes. And in meas. 30, only the last three notes of each sextuplet would be articulated. This is quite an intense piece you've written! I do have to say you seem to write for the winds more like a string player. Thanks for sharing
    1 point
  33. You tagged the wrong person, I think you meant @Luis Hernández right?
    1 point
  34. Mozart, piano sonata nr 13 (KV333)
    1 point
  35. Like Papercomposer has said, it is a delightful little quaint piece you have here. Harmonically it appears and sounds fine. I particularly liked the ending of the B section, which provides a necessary contrast in texture to the preceding part. Keep it up!
    1 point
  36. Hi everyone. This is a Sonata for Horn and Piano which I wrote recently. The description file explains what each movement is depicting. The recording has real musicians. Hope you enjoy it. Any constructive feedback is appreciated.
    1 point
  37. This is lovely. Sounds to me as something that might have come from 1770s. I would like to see the score. Overall this is well structured. The opening statement is reminiscent of the same from one of Mozart's (I think). Do upload the score if possible
    1 point
  38. Okay, so today I was feeling pretty bad and for some reason I thought I needed to improvise something dark using the Dies Irae theme. I wanted to portray my feelings in the freest possible way but at the same time record it just in case something interesting would happen. This wasn't my first take, but I didn't do many tries either, so you can be sure that 97% of it is pure improvisation. Anyways, share your thoughts about this. I know it is pretty mediocre compared with good improvisations, but I'm still an amateur and I don't have tools that would be helpful like perfe
    1 point
  39. I love this clam music. I listened it several times. 🥰
    1 point
  40. Wow! Its a really nice and beautiful piece! Well done! I wouldn't call it a symphony, I would call it a symphonic poem. One thing, it's kinda stuck in one place. Maybe its the dynamics and automation but I think its more about the felling, which is kind of the same - which makes this piece "not by itself"
    1 point
  41. I listened to it once with the story then with the score. I think I watched a short movie alike once, don't remember which one it was or it's name cause I watch dozens of short animated movies all the time. I think that your piece could do very well as a soundtrack to one of those, but I don't think you should perform it. Something about it just feels as if... you write for a computer, which is why the notation puzzled me. I think that it feels so mostly for the fact that... it seems as if you put the specific sounds you want without really acknowledging the players? S
    1 point
  42. Big work! In the end, the Form is Theme and Variations. As I thought it is not easy to go out of that field. Anyway, this Form is good to make a variety of developments, which I thing you fulfill quite well. When one listens to the thole piece, there is also a sensation of climax with variation 10. The one in pentatonic scale sounds a bit out of the general style. But the inner development of each variation is rich. The fact you chose the tonalities step by step is a rightful method, however modulations are sudden and abrupt. Some sort of transition between parts would have been perfect.
    1 point
  43. A big work, some of which sounds eastern.
    1 point
  44. You have some beautiful harmonic and melodic ideas. The piano sections are the strength of the song. I think maybe the brass in the beginning is a bit bombastic compared to the rest of the piece? Maybe have them play a bit softer or save them for another piece. The brass in the third section is very far from the rest of the songs also, but you can keep some of the ideas if you change the instrumentation and thus making it more coherent to the rest of the song? Suggestion: In the end piano section you can try to have like a string tone lingering (violin I) while having the piano
    1 point
  45. @composer9feb Wow thank you for that great explanation!
    1 point
  46. Nice music . thank you Rodrigo 🙂 @PaperComposer Musical Technical Terms1 ( Leopold Mozart violin school) Prestissimo indicates the quickest tempo, and Presto Assai is almost the same. For this rapid time a light and somewhat shorter stroke is required Presto, means quick, and Allegro Assai is but little different. Allegro, which, however, indicates a cheerful, though not too hurried a tempo, especially when moderated by adjectives and adverbs, such as: Allegro, ma non tanto, or non troppo, or moderato, which is to say that one is not to exag
    1 point
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