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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/15/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Sinfonia Concertante in C for Oboe, Bassoon, Fortepiano, Violin, Violoncello, and Orchestra. One movement in three parts: Allegro spiritoso – Andantino grazioso – Tempo primo Scoring: Flute, Principal Oboe, Oboe II, Principal Bassoon, Bassoon II, 2 Horns in C, 2 Trumpets in C, Timpani, Fortepiano, Principal Violin, Principal Violoncello, Strings Composed: January 10 - March 10, 2017 Commissioned by Billy Traylor, Director, Austin Baroque Orchestra. The Sinfonia Concertante is a form that had its heyday of popularity in the second half of the 18th Century. It is essentially a concerto for two or more solo instruments (five in this case) with orchestral accompaniment. It is considered to have emerged from the concerto grosso of the Baroque period, and is a cross-over form incorporating elements of the concerto and the symphony. Ordinarily, as with the concerto and symphony of the same period, it is in multiple movements, usually three or more. However, the present work was conceived as a single-movement work in three contiguous parts, contrasting in key and tempo (similar to an early opera overture) at the request of the commissioner, who also requested that the entire piece be less than 10 minutes long. As is often the case, all the principal players play ripieno with the orchestra when not performing a solo part, and likewise the fortepiano plays figured continuo when not soloing. The instrumentation is nearly identical to that of the Sinfonia Concertante in B-flat (1792) by Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), the addition of the concertatofortepiano being the only difference - again at the request of the commissioner - and I studied that work extensively before and during the writing of this piece. Perhaps the most famous example of this form is the Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra (1779) by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791). There is a lot going on in this piece. Not only is the form condensed, but much of the time the texture is such that there is a very active quintet layered on top of an orchestra, as if it were a chamber work and an orchestral work all at once. I found the feedback I got from the soloists during rehearsals very interesting indeed. The oboist complained that I called for E and E-flat above high-C from him, which for a skillful player should be doable even on a period Classical oboe; and in fact he cracked both of them in performance. The bassoonist was thrilled with her part, saying that what I had written was not only reasonably playable, but very idiomatic for the instrument and a lot of fun to play. The fortepianist (who played my own Peter Fisk fortepiano for the performance) had nothing to say at all, but I got a sense that perhaps his part wasn’t demanding enough, because he was often tempted to rush the tempo. The violinist and ‘cellist both got after me for taking them too high without adequate preparation, which I found very strange; being a string player myself, I know for certain that any player worth his salt should be able to jump to a high position and begin playing without having to be led up there through a series of position shifts, even in 18th Century music. At any rate, I was not persuaded by anything I heard from the players to make even the slightest change to the music, and with a knowing smile I nodded and expressed condolences where necessary, but did nothing to assuage their discomfort where there was any. It is a concerted work after all, and meant to be challenging – and if Mozart had written it, there wouldn’t have been a peep out of anyone. This work was premiered on May 26, 2018 by the Austin Baroque Orchestra – on period instruments! It was my first performance of one of my pieces to have been performed by such an ensemble, and it was most gratifying. I have been trying to get a live recording of the piece ever since, but the Director is hesitant to give it to me because there were a few mistakes made here and there. It was an excellent performance, nonetheless, but he’s a perfectionist. I’ll keep after him! In the meantime, I hope the present electronic rendering will serve. Enjoy, and by all means let me know what you think.
  2. 1 point
    This is a really great piece, congratulations. I think it's really hard to compose in the style of the classical period without quoting Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.
  3. 1 point
    Hey Guys, Do you know old silent movies, like Nosferatu? This is my favorite scene from the film, and I decided to make an own music for this scene. If you like my soundtrack, share it and like it! Don't you want to miss my next track? Follow me on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/olivercomposing
  4. 1 point
    Here goes my new piece (inspired on Barroque Music) Instruments: Oboe Solo, Violin Solo, String Orchestra and Harpsichord if you liked, you can also hear:
  5. 1 point
    This is my latest track.
  6. 1 point
    I find it Eerie music and Adventurus too! Good work artist Olivér Kovács !
  7. 1 point
    Hello everyone! Here's my new chamber music work, "Adventure Ouverture" for piano quintet. It's a small homage to adventure film music and film composers (Korngold, Williams, rota). Hope you like it!
  8. 1 point
    Mind traveling music! I like that. Thanks for the kind words.
  9. 1 point
    I haven't seen the original work, so I'm just looking at this as a concert band piece. I think the opening develops too slowly - I think it would sound better if four bars were cut out and the vibraphone came in at bar 5. I found the glock/oboe rhythm at 96 quite interesting. If you were intending this to be played by a real band, I would kind of recommend just having the glock play it - the reason being it's a very hard rhythm to play, and even I would probably find myself very slightly fudging it. Which would be fine if I was the only player with it, but two players fudging the same unison rhythm can end badly. Another thought I have is that it doesn't seem like it changes enough. You've got plenty of tempo/rhythmic variation, and you change up the chords, but you don't have any dynamic variation and you often use the same combinations of instruments. These things will come more naturally to you as you get more experience in writing - an idea will come with a specific sound/dynamic/colour in mind. You're also generally using the full range of registers available within the concert band - more ideas for variation would be using only the high register or the low register.
  10. 1 point
    @edfgi234 You have many good ideas of rhythms and your harmony is interesting. However, piece is a bit too long for my opinion and there were some parts where it felt quite empty: It's a bit of a dramatic fall after our ear got used to more rhythmic patterns, more complex harmony and more voices. It feels to empty, at least for me. If you want this nothingness I guess it's fine but I think you should drop these elements one by one. I'd simply give the right hand chords too, so it sounds... fuller in a way. Also I like the way it ends.
  11. 1 point
    I like what you've done here. There were a few times where it got a little harder to follow, but I think that the sort of nebulousness matches your own feelings towards your father. I hope that writing this piece of music brought you some sort of peace and perhaps closure. I think that this type of music is extremely important as it comes from a very real and raw artistic place, and is therapeutic to the artist as well as those who listen to it. Keep at it!
  12. 1 point
    I'd like to take a look at the score, but it definitely sounds nice, and sounds appropriate for the time period.
  13. 1 point
    I appreciate that you are branching out into other moods of music, though. It’s especially beneficial if you’re not used to it — getting out of the comfort zone is good. Making nothing but depressing music gets old after a while, too! The opening theme is ok, but the voice leading and blocky chords are big issues that hamper it. I think that’s why you find it “cheesy.” For example, in the opening 3 or so bars, it’s clunky to have this melody accompanied by chords that are always in their root position. In mss. 6 and 7, the L.H. thirds jump around all over the place. Try not to force the music, but rather, let one thought lead naturally into the next, and it will begin to flow how you want it to. The triplet sections are better. (I especially like the little grace notes in mss. 15 and 21.) The idea of having the more “solid” opening contrasted with a lighter staccato section is good and makes perfectsnese, it’s just the execution of the opening that needs work. This was neat to listen to — thanks for sharing! 😌
  14. 1 point
    This is a great work sculpted in this style, it's very pleasant to listen to and quite accessible; it's got all the great characteristics of enjoyable, serious, light, great music. Great job!
  15. 1 point
    I like it, ... some great ideas. I could imagine a prog-rock band working this too Like Yes, with Chris Squire bass, and Jimi Hendrix's jazz period drummer, on the verge of overplaying. Excellent riffs
  16. 1 point
    Hi @Seni-G... thats not a simple music, i think i might call it a music project. Or mind travelling music !!! Good work!
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