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  1. Hi, here my new composition a Concert for Strings and Organ based the Rule of the octave, some ascending and descending progressions and some schemas of the Galant Style, such as the Romanesca, the Prinner, the Monte, the Fonte, the Ponte, Cycles of Fifths among others. I have been working on that the last few weeks, after reading Harmony, Counterpoint, Partimento by Job Ijzerman, which I find quite inspiring. I still have to explore the chromatic schemas probided in the book, which I will do in the next weeks. Strings have only Violin I, Violin II and Celli, because the te
    2 points
  2. Thank you all! I've taken your advice into account and updated the score slightly. I'm still not completely happy with the dynamics and the tempo but hopefully it will be more balanced when it is played live. I have to give the final version by Monday. Please feel free to offer any other feedback!
    2 points
  3. I thought I could write some more movements based on those ancient melodies, and build a Symphony of the Hymns. So this is the second part... the third is in progress... I like to adapt the instrumentation to what I need, that's why I put two French horns, or two harps in this case, etc....
    1 point
  4. I have started a discord server! The idea is that all members will get the same materials and we will all work through them on a set course and discuss them as we go. This will prevent gaps in knowledge left by not being able to ask questions (if you're a self taught musician like me). Plus it will be easier to get motivated to do the hard work to become a successful composer if you're part of a group. People pay tens of thousands per year for that same experience but we can create it for free! We start our first book on June 1st, 2021, the book is "20th Century Harmony" by Vincent Persichetti
    1 point
  5. Gracias Luis! Ahora, en vez de imitar a compositores de hace 150 años, sólo imito a los de have 80 años 😂
    1 point
  6. That's a lovely menuet. Part A is pretty classical, but B is very colorfull and contrasting, and the more modern based harmony and modulations make the recapitulation on the last 4 measures even more satisfiying. The interplay piano-guitar also very right rythmically. I agree with Luis, nada que añadir o quitar (nothing to add there). Brilliant!
    1 point
  7. Thanks Jorge! I'm happy you like that. Whenever you want we can continue with some counterpoint exercises 😉 Un saludo!
    1 point
  8. Thanks @Olov! That's right, I'm also impressed how many things you can do with just a descending or ascending octave on the basse. That's why in baroque era one of the first things composition pupils had to learn was the rule of the octave, before to jump to more elaborated partimento techniques.
    1 point
  9. Hi @PeterthePapercomPoser, Thanks for your feedback. I'm happy you like that. Tritone you comment is just before an interesting new schema I learnt from the book. It's called Tonification in Descending Triads, meas. 498-500 you can see the local tonic is moving F-Dm- Bb, so descending in thirds. Vl.I is moving 5-4-3 with syncopation, Vl.II 7-1 (leading tone-tonic) and organ 5-1 (dominant-tonic). The Tritone you mention is a continuation of the schema to modulate back to the original tonic F for the repetition on the organ. I tryed some harmonies here and the more convincing to me was the aug.
    1 point
  10. This is an interesting topic! A couple of years ago I wrote down some keys and their qualities. I tried playing around with phrases on piano and I had to go back to them for a second opinion. I simply used wrote words like sharp, mild, timid, warm, cold for different major and minor keys. I also checked what church modes works well, in what key, for instance I thought the phrygian mode came across best in C, F and G while Dorian worked best in F and Bb, also B but a little milder. I think there could be some sonic qualities in different keys. You guys were talking about instrume
    1 point
  11. This is great! I love the adagio movement! I will have to take a look at that book too, seems really inspiring! Nice to see you are keeping up the good work, Guillem!
    1 point
  12. So beautiful and solemn. Love how the different instrument parts relieve each other. I like the soft harmonic structure with the descending chords
    1 point
  13. Thanks a lot for the nice comments! I'm glad you thought that the writing was idiomatic. About the modulation, In other works I've worked on, most not posted here on YC, I tend to modulate. The one I can think of was in the post called "Mozart-ian piece for oboe and strings.." etc, which you also kindly commented on, and you can check out the YouTube recording in the bottom of that thread if you haven't already 🙂 In this piece I didn't want to modulate actually, because I wanted it to feel "oriental" I guess, and persian music is more modal than tonal. But as Markus pointed out the Persia
    1 point
  14. This piece Persia II is a "sequel" to my "Persia" from 2011. Some of you in this forum suggested I'd right a suite or something in that direction, so I decided to try it. I do not want feedback on my old piece (Persia) in the YouTube link. I'm only attaching it so you can listen and hear the connection between the two. - Does this sequel "Persia II" work as a part two? - Will it be playable at written tempo? I want it to be the same tempo as "Persia", so it will feel as a double time. - See what I did with Da Capo? 🙂 Could it work?
    1 point
  15. Wow - great job! I think this is a great achievement for you! Throughout the piece I couldn't wait to hear the next movement - it always stayed interesting! This Harmony, Counterpoint and Partimento book certainly seems to have helped you a lot! Something that jumped out at me (I think because of the melodic tritone) is the 1st Violin part at meas. 501 where I guess you go into an augmented 6th chord treatment? Other than that it was nearly perfect! I think the amount of interplay between the organ and the strings is normal for a Baroque piece (from what little I know of course). Thanks
    1 point
  16. I love your language, in general. Vamos que me encanta que te metas en idiomas contemporáneos, más frescos. Congrats.
    1 point
  17. Very nicely change from part A to B, so different but complementary. Te ha quedado de fábula. Soft creative harmony in part B.
    1 point
  18. I'm sure there is a rather complex set of rules with a lot of historical precedent about how dictionaries split syllables, but the rule is to follow the dictionary. You are right, you wouldn't pronounce it "nat-u...", you'd pronounce it "na-tu...," but this is why musicians are always reading ahead in the score. If you aren't reading ahead, you'll get notes wrong, rhythms wrong, miss dynamics, get behind the beat... and you'll also mispronounce lyrics. Of the dictionary rules I know, one is that prefixes and suffixes are always split off from root words as their own complete unit, so
    1 point
  19. This one is a first for me in many respects. I don't think I've ever written a choral a capella piece like this before. I also came up with the Earth Day themed words to this myself (I thought about doing some kind of religious Latin text but I don't speak Latin and am not that religious so there goes that idea). The method for writing this piece is also quite a bit different for me and a first in this particular way of utilizing dice. I used a 12-sided musicians die to determine the key I would be writing in (A) and then used two regular 6-sided dice to come up with figured bass numbers.
    1 point
  20. I tend to agree. With fairly long notes the singers would sing Naaaaaa- tuuuuuu-raaaaaa-lyyyyy. sort of thing, not cut off the first vowel: Nat uuuuuuuu-raaaa-lyyy etc. One has to use one's instinct at times. Sometimes the phonetics suggest something different from an official 'splitting' of words. Sometimes even part of a phrase or word is ok if it seems to fit. Of course, ultimately it'll be settled when it's performed. (Things sometimes get changed in the cold light of live performance!). As it stands it's pretty good wordless and is worth congratulation for the rendering
    1 point
  21. Wow - thank you for that long and helpful response! That's exactly what I needed I think - I might just sit down and revise this piece according to your advice sometime in the near future. Somehow though when I pronounce "naturally" I don't see how I can possibly include the 't' sound as part of the first syllable - it sounds like it belongs as the beginning of the second one ("na - tu -ral - ly"). I don't know why the dictionary splits the syllables the way it does but it just sounds much more natural the way I have it LoL. I also have a question - with a choral score like thi
    1 point
  22. Congrats on your first foray into choral writing! If you wanted to clean up your score a bit, following current conventions for your text will help it look its best. Single syllable words spread over multiple notes, including tied notes, are written with an extender after the word like this: "And___," "Let___." Use a slur over the notes to make it clear that they all go to the same syllable. Multi-syllable words spread over multiple notes get hyphens within the word: "Nat-u-ral-ly." Use dictionary conventions about how to break up syllables, (just look each word up in an onl
    1 point
  23. Wow! This piece totally blew me away! Very nice job! I personally think your first foray into string quartet writing - the third movement - is the best (or at least my favorite). I am not even well versed enough in string quartet writing to know how to more critically examine this piece! Like for example - what do the arpeggios mean with the triangle notes? (I am not talking about the diamonds which indicate artificial harmonics) I tried looking it up and the only answer I can come up with is that triangles are used to indicate "the highest note possible" on the instrument but I don't t
    1 point
  24. Here is my short string quartet: https://musescore.com/user/23217691/scores/6761767. Please give me any feedback/criticism you have. It might be sight-read by a string quartet so please tell me if any part is too difficult (I'm especially worried about the semiquaver passages and the fast changes between pizz. and arco). Also I think the transitions between the two themes might not be smooth enough and the piece is supposed to be in ABA format so the long first transition might obscure this.
    1 point
  25. Yes, a very nice madrigal styled piece if perhaps short. The twists of harmony are most engaging and the piece is well-crafted. It just flows. Hopefully this won't be your last choral piece. You have some impressive results with the dice. Aleatoric, eh?! All good. Cheers!
    1 point
  26. As the title implies, this is my first composition for strings. Coincidentally it's also my first thing in a sonata like form. Tell me what you think! I don't shy away from constructive criticism. As a note: I do enjoy dissonance, both as a composer and a performer, but I know that some people do not enjoy that in the same way.
    1 point
  27. I found this piece to be quite nice overall. Personally, I feel that it could have improved with a little bit more variation and development of the themes you presented, although what is here is quite lovely.
    1 point
  28. nice piece. I have to admit that I don't like their duet as it is polyphonic in both instruments, but I liked your piece. You have formed a nice interaction that will make both of them stand out. The only part I doubt is the guitar playing 'ppp'. The dynamics are personal, but the guitar is already a low-sounding instrument, but you said you played the guitar, I guess you already thought about it. Thanks for sharing
    1 point
  29. Thanks! I kind of got my inspiration for using dice this way in writing music from the following video: I happen to also have a large variety of different dice that I can use in ways not exemplified here. I have 4-sided, 6-sided, 8-sided, 12-sided, and even 20-sided dice. Of course, not all of the dice have obvious uses in music. I just bought a set of dice intended for fantasy-rpg games. But my 12-sided musicians dice had to be purchased online. Thanks for your comments! Yeah - after coming up with the basic harmonies I was going to use with 6-sided dice determini
    1 point
  30. I really like it! It seems like a super interesting experiment, using the dices for composing. I think almost any kind of progression or musical context can be made beautiful if given enough effort and time, and this is a good way of practicing that kind of compositional variety. I also like the lyrics, simple but poetic and effective!
    1 point
  31. I already posted this piece a few months ago, but I did it in a post where I shared most of my piano pieces. Also I got a better digital audio and I decided to animate it. So this is the result, I hope you enjoy it. 🙂 Also if you want to know more check the description of the video.
    1 point
  32. Oh, nope. The first thing to keep in mind with woodwind writing is that it's not like writing for strings. Writing for brass is quite analogous to writing for strings, because each of the 2 families is relatively homogeneous (strings almost perfectly homogeneous, brasses a bit less so because you have are 2 kinds of bore). Also, each instrument is quite homogeneous along its register. Each woodwind has 2-3 registers with completely different characters, and each instrument has a completely different waveform (e.g. clarinet has no odd-numbered harmonics, while the others have), which kind
    1 point
  33. So, I've noticed this whenever I compose for woodwinds, be it as part of an orchestra or a woodwind quartet. Some blends are better than others. Sometimes it has to do with the dynamic curves being similar, like with the Oboe and Bassoon blend, but other times, I can't really seem to explain it. In terms of dynamic curves, I'd say these are the best pairs: Flute and Clarinet Oboe and Bassoon And of course, there are these 2 classic blendings: Flute and Oboe in thirds Flute and Bassoon in octaves When I try to blend the Flute and Clarinet, I often have th
    1 point
  34. I think it's quite a good quartet, good melodic material that is easy to remember and latch onto. some pointers: - There is quite a lot of instances where there is a clear clash in registers which makes it very hard to distinguish the foreground from the background. Try to separate the registers more. It's also partly down to the dynamics markings - I think it would be better to make the semiquavers slurred, for the intended effect that I'm guessing you're going for. - Particularly like the idea at bar 19-20! However, the development of the motif can be improved, the second it
    1 point
  35. There are 2 main things to consider if you want a "blended" woodwind sound: 1) All the instruments must be in either their "strong" or "weak" register. Adler's book has charts with all this, but I recommend reading the whole treatise. 2) Chords should be voiced in close position, i.e. without huge gaps. That's explained in Rimskiy's book, and there can be some exceptions, but these are quite rare. Also, horns are very often used to enhace the blend, especially in pre-20th century music. They aren't technically a woodwind, but can act as one. If you want to split hair
    1 point
  36. This sounds great! I worry a little that by choosing to use the upper limit of the soprano range and the lower limit of the bass range in an a cappella piece some groups might have performance issues. If the sopranos short the upper notes and the piece drifts slightly flat, the basses may have trouble producing the lowest notes. It was a good idea to split the basses and sopranos in some sections as you did. That should help. The variable meter works really well. The whole piece speaks the text very naturally. I also enjoyed the use of brass in your demo video. It suits the
    1 point
  37. Pretty good if a little classical. You need have no worries about the semiquavers, they're well within the abilities of quartet players. (Listen to bits and pieces from Beethoven's late quartets and you'll see what I mean. The Op 131 is full of advanced playing). The double stops would need agility but they all seem playable. Some look awkward but they're ok: Bar 22 for example, the cello part. The cellist would have to play it on the G and D strings but it isn't much of a stretch - but bear in mind there's be s slide moving from some of your double stops legato - again, this won't be a p
    1 point
  38. The string orchestra sounds good because of phasing. It's actually, aside from guitars, basically one of the only ensembles that benefits from phasing. It's for this reason I don't necessarily think String Quartet vs String Orchestra is the best example. Especially since, in both cases, you can still have the same number of parts, just a different number of players per part.
    1 point
  39. It's a long time since I've had anything to do with strict counterpoint but without a very detailed look at your score everything seems ok. The strict rules are about intervals and the moving of parts. You've achieved renaissance polyphony because each part is a part in its own right and I can see no "illegal" intervals or movements. However, it sounds liturgical and is a solemn (if pleasant sounding, atmospheric) Kyrie. So, answering your questions: The form is ok; you don't seem to be breaking any rules; What next? I'm only familiar with the Anglican service and unless I'm mis
    1 point
  40. About the string orchestra vs. string quartet debate - I think the string orchestra yields a completely different tone color than individual string instruments in a quartet and I tend to prefer the string orchestra. The combination of string instruments in an orchestra yields a whole that's somehow greater than the sum of it's parts - a more "padded" and subtle sound. Let's not also forget that the string orchestra has double basses which expand the orchestra's range considerably in comparison to a quartet. Also, the balance in an orchestra is better in my opinion as violins in a string qua
    1 point
  41. Here is the link to my albums: Spirito Musicale I hope you enjoy!
    1 point
  42. I think it sounds as renaissance polyphony would be expected to sound although I am far from knowledgeable on that subject much less vocal music in general! Any particular reason or purpose why you are trying to emulate renaissance polyphony? Will you be having this performed? I know that even during those times in was not uncommon for some very dissonant passing harmonies (Monteverdi) to be utilized which you don't seem to do. I love choral/vocal music though that introduces and resolves some beautiful dissonances. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  43. This is my first venture into composing video game music. I did this for the "7 Days of Video Game Music" composing challenge. (This is a youtube playlist with seven tracks, one for each day of the challenge.) All of the tracks were made in GarageBand, using mainly loops with some of my own elements added throughout.
    1 point
  44. I really like the first Persia piece which I think you pulled off really well. To be frank, I don’t feel much connection at all with the sequel. It sounds much more influenced by western classicism. Perhaps you are trying to depict a medieval crusader army of knights riding to the holy land to reconquer the holy land from the infidels of the East.
    1 point
  45. Hi Olov, I think this exemplifies some quite idiomatic writing for the string quartet! I like the pesante feel and your melodies are good. As a kind of general criticism I have noticed that you pretty much tend to hover around your home key without modulating. I think if you modulated to another key after stating your main thematic material it might open up your forms to secondary themes and also help you write longer pieces. That's my suggestion. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  46. Coming at it from a producer's perspective, I do think there is something to using different keys. It has to do with how the frequencies interact as you get closer to the bass region of the frequency spectrum. This region starts to get much more sensitive to playing notes that are closer together because they are slower, so you hear the beating of the clashing frequencies more. Transposing a piece up will alleviate some of this "beating". So finding the right balance for your progression with the mood you're aiming for and with the right bass representation absolutely comes into play for me.
    1 point
  47. Hi @PaperComposer, thank you for your comment, and sorry for the late response. That does make sense to me. I'm lucky enough to have perfect pitch so I don't have to check with a reference, but I always write down the music in the key I heard it in my head. I read an article about Baroque tuning, which said that the reason that 'concert pitch' is higher now is that it sounds more intense or excited than the low A432 or even A415. I heard a recording of Chopin's nocturne op 9 no 2 where the piano was tuned a little higher than normal - I noticed that the music sounded overly bri
    1 point
  48. Since you are still active on the website I decided to give this old thread a go LoL ... In short - I don't know how I pick the keys I pick. I simply sing or hum or whistle the melody while I'm coming up with it and check what key I'm in against a tuning fork or the volume button on my cell phone and I try to keep it in that key. Very rarely I change the key of the piece I am writing to better suit the necessity of the instruments - like my last Piano Quartet in G# minor was originally in G minor but I had to transpose it up a half step because I needed the cello to be able to play a le
    1 point
  49. I definitely think that playing pieces is at least part of what lead me to define the emotion for some keys(such as for example the most variable key being C minor) but I also think that my own improvisations are also part of it. For example, when I improvise in F minor, I find that it always sounds very sad, like it is The Key of Death. But when I play for example Piano Sonata in F minor op. 2 no. 1, it doesn't sound sad, rather it sounds dramatic. Chopin's F minor Ballade also doesn't sound sad to me. And yes, I do experience a change of mood with transposition.
    1 point
  50. I myself have specific emotional associations with certain keys. I will separate this into a major and minor list. Major Key Emotions: C major - Happy boredom in most conditions G major - Completed a minor task or in general, warm D major - Majestic A major - Bouncy, staccato reinforces it E major - Triumph over something major B major - Dreamy, Figuring out what to do next F# major - Dreamy, Jazzy C# major - Eternal Db major - Dreamy Ab major - Dreamy, Flying and enjoying it Eb major - Sleeping in a field of flowers
    1 point
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