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  1. Hi guys! I am back from a very long hiatus on this forum! This is one of the works I composed for my music exams, please feel free to give some feedback and share some critique. Thank you! Compositional Technique used: Japanese Modes, Quartal and Quintal Harmony Pieces of Inspiration: - Gustav Holst - Japanese Suite - Toshio Mashima - Notes of Japan - Joe Hisaishi - One Summer's Day 町祭り - Festivals of a Japanese Town, Op. 11 (Draft 1) - 町祭り.mp3 町祭り - Festivals of a Japanese Town, Op. 11.pdf
    2 points
  2. He's a "moody" work ... for a contemplative day in another time.
    2 points
  3. Greetings. This is my very first post on the Young Composers community, and I would like to share one of my piano compositions that I had composed several weeks ago. This piano piece is a polonaise, which was written to imitate Frédéric Chopin's compositional style. Due to my busy schedule, I did not have the time to practice and record this piece. So instead, the audio file was exported from MuseScore 2.3.2. Any feedback would be appreciated, and I hope you will enjoy it! Carl Koh Wei Hao
    2 points
  4. Hi everyone, I'm in the process of uploading as much of my music as I can on youtube, cuz what good does it do sitting around in my computer huh? Anyway, here's my second piano sonata as it was performed in 2016. It's divided into 3 movements and all three movements are following the typical sonata-form conventions to some degree or another. It took around 4 months to write the score and around 6 months in rehearsal time to get it performed to an acceptable degree. The third movement is specially challenging, but I think it sounds cool. Either way, have fun.
    2 points
  5. I've been having the impression I was playing a bit too safe with my harmonies lately, so I've done what I used to do at the beginning: do a restricted writing exercise and re-harmonize or rethink simple folk melodies. You may recognize the third piece, its lyrics have been translated to English and Spanish, at least. There's also some trivial quote hidden in there. I include both the full orchestral score, and the initial piano sketch. As a curiosity, I also include pics of the first 2 folk dances. Both involve steel-reinforced wooden sticks, and are fast-paced and violent. Someone breaking a bone isn't that rare (the xylophone in the first basically parodies the bones breaking). I danced myself to the 2nd melody.
    1 point
  6. A nice set of variations in the "Classical" style ... very Beethoven in feel.
    1 point
  7. Good, very good. Live recordings are better than other variations. Have you ever tried musescore.com? A friend of mine told my about this stuff he also uploads his scores on this web site examples- https://musescore.com/user/7339591. Very usefull in case the originals are suddenly lost.
    1 point
  8. I agree with you that there is a sweet range for the Oboe - maybe e - d above the octave. So I concur that if I was to compose for the Oboe I would take that into consideration. However, I must again stressed that a professionally trained oboist with good technique should have little trouble attacking those low notes. Now having said that ... why make an oboists life miserable composing way down in the basement. Why, because, the weather, temperature, humidity, reed behavior ... and much more all influences your ability to play well. So at times ... what should be easy becomes more of a challenge! So I would rather not compose down there unless it really contributed to the composition. And yes, since I am a community orchestra player ... I do know that the skill levels in community orchestra vary from poor to very good and at times exceptional. The problem is more for the attack - to play softly and in pitch rather than a raucous sound.
    1 point
  9. Well, you're addressing me here as I made the comment. Respecting your knowledge/experience it would still seem a worthwhile caution not to count on an orchestra or ensemble having a concerto-quality player in the ranks. None of the oboists doing the circuit in our local orchestras could get the same dynamic range from the bottom Bb and the Bb 2 octaves higher. Sure, sometimes we write for particular players and their abilities but many composers sending their scores around wouldn't be aware of a player's qualities if accepted. Simply, in any course on orchestration and the couple of text books I have, the student is advised on the strengths and weaknesses of the various woodwinds.
    1 point
  10. Yes it is supposed to be a harpsichord!
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  11. For me the work is too "square" which makes the work feel a bit ponderous. I would experiment with a more interesting counter melody and/or bass line to create a bit of momentum and variation.
    1 point
  12. Hey all, I like to address the "perception" that the low notes on the Oboe or/and English Horn are coarse. This is really a misnomer, in that, a good skilled player will have no problem producing the sweetest sound in the lower registers as well as anywhere else in the scale. It's all in the attack/breath, embouchure and reed construction.
    1 point
  13. I really like the counterpoint! It appears that your fundamentals are there, I think that you could try something more creative and adventurous though. Also with regard to the rendering, just curious, is this supposed to be with a harpsichord? Because it sounds as such.
    1 point
  14. Thank you so much! It's really an honor to receive praise from you!
    1 point
  15. Hey, this is really pretty! It sounds very delicate, like the pastoral scenes from old Japanese period drama films, and I like how you made the melody fit in with such pretty harmonies! About orchestration, I doubt I could add anything constructive, as @Quinn seems to have a better idea about it than I do, so I'll just leave it here and say I enjoyed this. Thanks!
    1 point
  16. This is an earlier work for Violin and Piano. I hope you Un Vent Froid...7-22-21.pdffeel the chill in the air!
    1 point
  17. Hi Peter and Bkho, Thank you for taking the time to listen to my work. I agree with your opinion about the ending – it may sound abrupt probably because the ritardando wasn't enough compared to other parts. Anyway, it's a good idea to add a coda to make the music sound more complete. For me, this polonaise is special compared to my other compositions simply because it imitates a composer's style. Most of my pieces are written in my style – if not, it'll be a compilation of the styles of various composers. I used a certain degree of repetition in my music because I believe it is essential for the melody to be memorable. Thank you for highlighting this statement, and I will be more aware of it to avoid my future works sounding too bland. Carl Koh Wei Hao
    1 point
  18. Another excellent piece supported by a fine rendering. I have certain interests in Japanese culture but not to the extent of familiarity with their modes and scales which, with a very long history, are probably regional and influenced by Chinese and Indonesian traditions. However, the piece came off with verve and panache and fits the bill about festival. The opening C Ang solo is fine. Taking it at concert pitch, the low F in the second phrase could probably manage a 'p'. This instrument isn't as coarse in its bottom notes as the oboe. I liked your use of free time and the commas to indicate phrase and breathing. It may be worth pushing the flute dynamic up a couple of notches in bar 7. The effect you want is pp but to balance this entry even against the harp, the flautist will probably have to go mf or even f. How you notate this is a debatable point - I'd personally put a higher dynamic but pp is technically more correct. Otherwise fine. The interplay of parts throughout the score is good, the piano offering a sustained background mostly. To me, it had a north 'Balinese' tone, the rapid 'double-time' playing that caught-on around the turn of the 20th century IIRC but that's because I'm more familiar with such music (if at all). Well, congratulations and this piece should earn good marks towards your exam. Cheers. .
    1 point
  19. Very nice, certainly captures Chopin's style very well. Personally, I think it is a bit repetitive, could be tighter structurally and I also echo Peter's comment about the ending being too abrupt, definitely coda of some sort would help a lot.
    1 point
  20. Wow - you did a very nice job of imitating Chopin which I think was your intent. You are obviously well studied! I bet you could write a more original Polonaise if you weren't so concerned with writing like Chopin. Also - I feel like the piece just stops at the end and would need a more substantial coda in order to sound finished especially given how well developed this Polonaise already is. Great job! It's a delight to hear.
    1 point
  21. Sinfonia in c major for baroque orchestra. Grave/allegro movement. Please tell me what you think SimenN
    1 point
  22. It's pretty. The imitation of voices is some places is nice. However, that results in a lot of movement in parallel. The harmonic progression throughout would be more effective with more contrary motion, such as Giuillem82 showed in his version of the harmony in your last two measures. One more thing: The crossing of the violin and flute parts in bars 9-13 doesn't quite work for me. I'm sorry I'm not more articulate about why. It just seems a little weak. Cheers, Jer
    1 point
  23. Variations on a theme in D major in the late classical style.
    1 point
  24. Great soundtrack for a Film Noir~! You set a nice mood ... what comes next?
    1 point
  25. I feel kind of weird not posting as much music as I once did. I've been busy with music, but mostly learning songs from this band I'm in. Since this site has revamped a few times, a lot of what I've posted has been lost, so I decided to share some pieces I've written in the past as a way for anyone interested to hear some of the stuff I've done. Even though a lot of what I'll post in these here "archives" are works I probably won't edit or revise, I'm always open and would love to hear some of your thoughts and critiques for the future. This was an experiment with quartal and quintal harmonies, and building them with sustained and elastic chords. I remember trying to make music interesting without the focus being on a melody. The goal was to depict the ocean with lots of color and texture. I wanted odd melodic phrases to blend and blur. There weren't any intentions to extend this as part of a multi-movement suite or anything, but hey, if there were ever a prospect of a performance than maybe. I'm someone who loves to see a score, but sadly I wrote this entirely in Cubase so no presentable score. At some point I'll maybe notate it all out. I hope you enjoy!
    1 point
  26. Done! The rhythm is not quite accurate, but it should be readable (hopefully)
    1 point
  27. Thanks, @Snake_Cake! I'm glad you liked it and the performance! I've never heard that term "YARB" before (though I'm not a big Reddit user), but I can still respect attempts to write romantic music. It's not easy to write successful romantic music, blending harmonic beauty, emotion, depth, and creativity, into a flowing and sound piece of music, but I'm glad you thought my piece was successful!
    1 point
  28. you are not posting in the right section. And I'm not sure I could think of one section where this post would be fitting.
    1 point
  29. Any feedback would be appreciated. I dont know whether the piece works.
    1 point
  30. Very, very nice. I sense there are many people that want to write some Romantic piece, I think extremely few actually succeed. On the composer subreddit there's even a name for this: "YARB" (yet another Romantic behemoth). Your pieces seem to be the strange exception, this is very finely crafted and yet expressive. Congrats on the performance!
    1 point
  31. Yeah, the only time you can get away with not putting in any rests or breath marks or even phrasing slurs is a woodwind solo piece such as this one:
    1 point
  32. very nice piece. You are proceeding very cautiously and confidently. the ornaments in the performance add vitality to the piece
    1 point
  33. My comment does not related to the technical aspects of the work but rather to wind writing. Please remember wind players need to breathe. And providing those moments are important. If not some players may cheat a bit here and there and drop a note!
    1 point
  34. Quite inventive! You mostly do a good job of manipulating the motives and your first episode is superb! I think where this starts to suffer a bit is in the free counterpoint that you employ. I don't know if it would have sounded monotonous if you had written a similar episode to bring you to the G minor middle entry, but it seems like a better idea to continue to create interesting counterpoint using sequences based on fragments of the main motivic material. You might think that you already did that but to me it just doesn't sound as logical after the first episode. Also, it feels like you end the piece too early and force yourself to return to D minor like you were hurrying to end it. Also, I feel some discomfort about the phrase lengths you employ as well. There are ways to make phrases with an odd number of measures sound natural as well, but on the whole phrases with an even number of measures are more complete sounding. You risk making your piece sound like a note-salad when your music lacks strong cadences into the keys of the middle entries (by way of the conclusion of well constructed episodes). I'm mostly referring to meas. 10 - 18. It doesn't quite sound like an episode and it's not a middle entry which puts it in a kind of no-mans land of free counterpoint without a point. In an invention you really should take care that everything you write is either a statement of the main motif or an episode (and that the episodes use sequences to develop fragments of the main motif). I hope I have not gotten too carried away with too much advice-giving and that some of this is still helpful! It was nonetheless an enjoyable invention. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  35. Philip Glass philipglass.com Philip Glass is an American composer and pianist. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential composers of the late 20th century. Glass's work has been associated with minimalism, being built up from repetitive phrases and shifting layers.Wikipedia Born:January 31, 1937, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Genres:Minimalism, contemporary classical, film score
    1 point
  36. Thank you for the review and suggestions! The engraving advice is well received. I am please you are getting to know my style of work. And of course of you enjoy the work - all the better!
    1 point
  37. Here is the link to my albums: Spirito Musicale I hope you enjoy!
    1 point
  38. Thank you Jared for taking the time to review my work and for your detailed comments. I agree with you about repeats, in the 18th century repeats were nearly always varied with ornamentation and embellishment and I've been looking into how performers would go about doing this and after a bit of Google exploring I found an essay written in the 1700's on the subject. In it the author laments about the decline of variation in performances of repeated sections and he details how to tastefully vary the music to avoid monotony. It occurred to me that whenever I compose I should leave out the repeat bars and just copy and paste the section and then vary it according to how performers would have done so back then. I'll take a closer look at my engraving and see what I can do to polish the presentation of the piece.
    1 point
  39. OK so, first things first, the quality of the playing in the recording is top notch, but sadly the quality of the recording itself leaves a lot to be desired. Too bad. Second, I think the score needs a lot of work. It's weirdly spaced and there's a lot of stuff that needs to be removed and edited. Additionally, it would help to have clear markings when each variation starts (along with the number.) Right now everything is just glued together and it's not pretty to read. Also, the score is lacking any dynamics, even if the recording actually has them to some degree (but then again not as much as it should be, leading to the whole thing sounding sort of flat.) And on that note, I think the musical material is handled with competence, but it lacks a great deal of the experimental nature of what variations were meant to have back in the vienna classic. Take Mozart's Variations on a Minuet by Duport, K.573 (written in 1789,) which has some pretty wild sections (the coda specially) and obviously something like Beethoven's 32 Variations in C minor (WoO 80 from 1806) really stands out as being an extreme example. In contrast, your piece is adequate in the language, but it's too safe and thus ends up feeling more like an academic exercise. I think that this is a fundamental issue with your piece here rather than something that you can just fix. I'd advise for the next variation cycle that you take a lot more liberties, both with rhythm as well as with the register changes and tempo differences. Also, it'd be cool if you took a note from Beethoven's C minor variations and linked the variations together in a sort of overarching structure, it makes the piece that much more interesting.
    1 point
  40. Oh, this is the first time I hear a pitched speech synthetizer. Damn, will it be a great news for people who can't sing when they come up with a more realistic-sounding version 😛 I have to say I didn't really enjoy listening, but this has nothing to do with your wrting. I was simply put off by this robotic voice. Otherwise, I do admire the simplicity of your melodies, and of your wrting in general (I remember listening to another work that was also strikingly simple, yet sounded really pleasant and "efficient"). Simplifying my stuff is something I am myself trying to work on, so hopefully I'll getinspiration from you 🙂
    1 point
  41. LoL - now that I know what the words are I can't help getting the feeling that it's some kind of Dada-ist poem that you've set. Or I can imagine some kind of indigenous child uttering it's first words or trying to express some kind of deep meaning about the celestial panorama. Still - enjoyable to listen to!
    1 point
  42. I've listen it before, but I concentrate more when I listen with the score. It's quite a dramatic and impressive piece. The interaction of the strings with the piano is very good. thanks for sharing
    1 point
  43. You have to make an honest assessment about where you are in your musical development. One doesn't expect a first-year Spanish student to write a novel in the language, but to start out with simple exercises based on proper grammar. I agree somewhat with MJFOBE, although I would not attempt anything in sonata form. Harmonized melody in basic song form, AABA, is a good exercise. Side note: The arpeggiated dhords are very Philip Glass. Was that intentional? Cheers Jer
    1 point
  44. Quartet in G minor for 2 Violas and 2 Violoncelli Movements: 1. Allegro energico (Sonata form) 2. Andante un poco adagio (Sonata form) 3. Menuetto: Allegro 4. Presto (Rondo form – ABACABA with Coda) Style: Late Classical, ca. 1790-1800 Composed: 3 August – 6 December, 2018 at Austin Here they are then,…dearest Friend, these six children of mine. They are, it is true, the fruit of a long and laborious endeavour, yet the hope inspired in me by several Friends that it may be at least partly compensated encourages me, and I flatter myself that this offspring will serve to afford me solace one day. –W.A. Mozart, Published Letter of Dedication, Six String Quartets to Haydn, 1 September, 1785 I quote Mozart here because his sentiments are very much my own regarding the Six Quartets I composed last year for 2 Violas and 2 Violoncelli, of which the present posting is but one example; though it is one of the best, choosing it to post from among the others in the set was like choosing a favourite of my children. Though Mozart expresses himself with a humility uncommon for him, he clearly was proud of his work, as I am of mine. Indeed, I consider my Quartets to be my magnum opus to date – the most important and highest quality work I have ever produced, and the crowning achievement of decades as a composer. Having researched the matter to some degree, to my knowledge no other composer has attempted a work for this combination of instruments, hence mine are likely unique in the chamber music repertoire. Despite being unusual, I have found the combination of pairs of violas and ‘cellos, though not without its challenges and limitations, to be very successful and pleasing, and I hope you will agree. The 1st Viola and 1st ‘Cello take the lead a fair amount of the time, and the instruments also operate in pairs as one might expect, but much of the time the ensemble is a cohesive whole, with all the instruments more or less equal. The character of this work is fraught with frenetic energy and angst, particularly in the fast and furious outer movements – even in moments of relative calm, the forward motion is relentless. The easygoing second movement is a comparative walk in the park, moving leisurely along. The third movement is a nervous, jumpy minuet, punctuated by forte diminished chords; the Trio alla ghironda (in the style of a hurdy gurdy) is characterized by a harmonized melody in G-Lydian mode in the violas, accompanied by a drone in the ‘cellos for a rustic sound. Fun fact about this piece: I conceived the final Rondo during a Nine Inch Nails set at a rock festival in San Antonio! And another: I composed the first half of the opening movement entirely in my head before I began writing it down. I’ll be very interested to know what people think of this piece and the combination of these instruments, and I hope listening to it will be a pleasant adventure into a different sound-world.
    1 point
  45. Hello all, I have a question regarding pick-up measures and how to go ahead with it in Finale 2009. When I start a piece with a pick-up measure, I am supposed to end my composition with a measure equalling the number of beats minus those put in the pick-up measure, as you all well know. Hence, the last measure in 4/4 becomes 4/4 minus the pick-up (let us sau 1/4), hence in the example cited here it is 3/4 for the last bar. Although I have the pick-measure at the beginning of my piece (e.g. one beat), I cannot figure out what to do to force finale into a last bar of e.g. 3/4. Finale will automatically put a rest on the fourth beat. Hence my appeal to you all: how do I proceed technically in Finale to create a proper last measure. Thanks all for your reaction, WS
    1 point
  46. This is how you do it. (finale expert in the house) You go to simple entry (which is the picture of the note on the left keypad). Then from the top menu, you will click "Simple". Click "Simple Entry Options..." UNCLICK "fill with rests at the end of measures". And, now you can write incomplete measures. Be careful, though, that you do not forget to put rests in where you DO need them at the end of measures. haha. Merry Christmas.
    1 point
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