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I'm going to share a few melodies I've composed. Now, I'm a complete novice at composing, which means these melodies might be senseless rubbish. From my perspective, they're astonishing melodies that convey specific moods. For example, when listening to my 1st melody, I think it conveys a profound, otherworldly mood/scene. So, I think it's a profound melody (an astonishing melody) that conveys something otherworldly. But, I can't trust my own judgment because, as I said, I'm a complete novice at composing. So, just because I judge my melodies as astonishing, profound, or powerful, and just because I judge them as conveying specific scenes, events, or characters, doesn't mean I should trust said judgment. Any musical judgment I make might be false. But, if, let's pretend, I became a professional composer with a lot of musical knowledge, then I could trust my musical judgment because it wouldn't be false.

Anyway, before I share my melodies, I wish to say that my goal as a composer is to create compositions, such as melodies or songs, that are not only astonishing, but convey the specific moods I wish to convey. Talented composers are able to achieve this goal. For example, John Williams has created astonishing compositions that conveyed what he wanted to convey, which was the world of Harry Potter and Star Wars, the character Superman, etc. I'm not implying I wish to be as talented as John Williams. I'm just saying I wish to possess the level of talent required to achieve my composing goal. I think I have this talent because I think my melodies are astonishing and convey the specific moods I wanted to convey. But, I might not have that talent, and I just think I do. With that being said, I'm going to share my melodies, which have chord progressions. I used Hookpad to compose, by the way:

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/melody1?si=506637fe9149408b91ef1f9e01c21355&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/melody1alternateversion?si=0c804df2f1364ac6b237ac81a349ff9c&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/melody2?si=b6513946834049db9ce1db4bb8f10d94&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/melody3?si=9c13cb3e9db24b59a8a751db3add5f89&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/melody4?si=99dec3cc2c164fe98125bba4938f125e&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

Edited by Transcended Dimensions
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I think you've made your style of writing melodies work for you with the kind of accompaniment, harmony and orchestration that you use.  There isn't really any objective "this is good and that's bad" advice that I can give you though.  There are just characteristics or compositional habits to be noticed and pursued further or weeded out in future compositions.  Your melodic choices are a matter of your particular tastes in music and what you want to accomplish - and we live in a time of so many different musical languages coexisting side by side that you can basically pick your context or palette anew with each composition.  So, these are just the patterns that I've noticed in these 4 melodies that you've posted:

Your melody is basically one note per beat most of the time.  This works though because you have some great accompanimental overdriven guitar riffs underneath it that really rock.  The harmony also stays pretty basic using your I, IV and V chords quite often.  This also works as making the harmony more complex by itself doesn't always improve a composition.

I think melody 3 is my favorite as it is more upbeat and there's more variation in the lengths of the notes in the melody.

Thanks for sharing!

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On 12/19/2021 at 8:48 PM, PeterthePapercomPoser said:

I think you've made your style of writing melodies work for you with the kind of accompaniment, harmony and orchestration that you use.  There isn't really any objective "this is good and that's bad" advice that I can give you though.  There are just characteristics or compositional habits to be noticed and pursued further or weeded out in future compositions.  Your melodic choices are a matter of your particular tastes in music and what you want to accomplish - and we live in a time of so many different musical languages coexisting side by side that you can basically pick your context or palette anew with each composition.  So, these are just the patterns that I've noticed in these 4 melodies that you've posted:

Your melody is basically one note per beat most of the time.  This works though because you have some great accompanimental overdriven guitar riffs underneath it that really rock.  The harmony also stays pretty basic using your I, IV and V chords quite often.  This also works as making the harmony more complex by itself doesn't always improve a composition.

I think melody 3 is my favorite as it is more upbeat and there's more variation in the lengths of the notes in the melody.

Thanks for sharing!

 

Thanks for your response. Now, I no longer think my melodies are astonishing. Why is that? Well, if they were astonishing, you and others would be astonished by them. Also, I no longer think they convey what I thought they conveyed. For example, with my 1st melody, I said it was profound and otherworldly. If it really was a profound/astonishing melody that conveyed an otherworldly scene, listeners would be astonished by it, and they'd say it's profound and otherworldly. Since this isn't the case, that must mean it's just some ordinary melody that I thought was profound and otherworldly, when it really wasn't. So, clearly, I'm projecting false judgments upon my melodies. This is a problem because I want to create astonishing melodies that actually convey whatever I wish to convey. I don't want to be creating melodies that I just think are astonishing and convey what I want to convey, when they really don't.

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On 12/19/2021 at 10:34 PM, Transcended Dimensions said:

Thanks for your response. Now, I no longer think my melodies are astonishing. Why is that? Well, if they were astonishing, you and others would be astonished by them. Also, I no longer think they convey what I thought they conveyed. For example, with my 1st melody, I said it was profound and otherworldly. If it really was a profound/astonishing melody that conveyed an otherworldly scene, listeners would be astonished by it, and they'd say it's profound and otherworldly. Since this isn't the case, that must mean it's just some ordinary melody that I thought was profound and otherworldly, when it really wasn't. So, clearly, I'm projecting false judgments upon my melodies. This is a problem because I want to create astonishing melodies that actually convey whatever I wish to convey. I don't want to be creating melodies that I just think are astonishing and convey what I want to convey, when they really don't.

Why are you depending on one person's perspective to make yours valid/invalid though? You are just as much a person as Papercomposer. Its ok to be you, music is the most beautiful of all projections!

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23 hours ago, Left Unexplained said:

Why are you depending on one person's perspective to make yours valid/invalid though? You are just as much a person as Papercomposer. Its ok to be you, music is the most beautiful of all projections!

 

First of all, when I say I wish to make astonishing melodies, I mean melodies that astonish most people. If, let's pretend, my melodies had thousands of views, ratings, and comments, and most people weren't astonished by these melodies, then I wouldn't consider them to be astonishing. If most people disliked them, then I wouldn't consider them to be good melodies either. As you can see, when determining whether a melody, song, or certain product is good or astonishing, you must go by what most people think. If the overall rating is excellent and most people are astonished, then that melody, song, or product was obviously astonishing and very good. There are many musical compositions on youtube and soundcloud that have many likes and few dislikes. That means they're very good, and some of them astonish most people. My goal is to create compositions, such as melodies or songs, that are also very good and astonishing, and upload them to youtube and soundcloud for many people to view, rate, and comment. Now, what makes me think the melodies I've just shared aren't very good and astonishing? Well, it's because I've shared them to enough people, and the responses I've got were just a slight or moderate liking of them (no astonishment), apathy towards them, or dislike.

Most people disliked them or were apathetic towards them. Furthermore, plenty of people have viewed this forum thread/topic. If my melodies really were very good and astonishing, many people would've responded to this topic with praise. But, only 2 people have responded. I've also created this same topic on another forum, which has even more views, and nobody has responded. With that being said, I'm going to say one last thing here, which is that, when most people agree that a composition conveys a particular person or thing, that means it conveys that person or thing. For example, since most people agree the Superman theme conveys Superman, that means it conveys him. But, of all the people I've shared my 1st melody with, nobody agrees it conveys an otherworldly scene. So, that means it doesn't convey said scene. Nobody thinks it's a profound melody either. So, that means it's not profound. As for my other melodies, nobody thinks they convey the scenes I thought they conveyed either. As a composer, I wish to not only impact/astonish the audience, but to do so in such a way that whatever I wish to convey is actually being conveyed. I'm obviously not achieving this goal. So, I'm considering giving up composing.

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One way forward in this discussion: tell us what kind of moods you want to convey with your music and melodies and we might be able to help you. It will help to give us the sheetmusic. You want to write astonishing melodies but there can be all sorts of astonishing melodies. To want to write a melody people love isn't about the qualities of the melody itself but about a certain qualitative effect it takes on people minds. Start with the content, the actual qualities you want to convey in the melodies and tell us how you conveyed them. Why did you choose this or that note and not another one? We might point out better examples of the same idea so you can look it up, analyse and learn. Also: if a melody makes big impression on a certain audience it often has do with the piece as a whole, every element in the piece has influence on the others, it gives the context to the musicians (and the listener). Although it is a lofty thing to write melodies who a lot of people like and of good quality (this doesn't go always together) start with smaller goals first.  And know even a composer genius doesn't crawl out of his bed to write a masterpiece. Sometimes it just  happens although we can learn to open up to make that happen with the right skill.

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On 12/20/2021 at 3:06 AM, Transcended Dimensions said:

But, if, let's pretend, I became a professional composer with a lot of musical knowledge, then I could trust my musical judgment because it wouldn't be false.

Nope. You can't get over that barrier, all you can do is copy what "the general trend is" for what effect you want. If X is the cliché for "sad melody" then you copy that and give it a little variation and you're done. Because the judgement you're asking about is entirely based on what others perceive, you're stuck following established tropes and that's how most movies do it too. In that case you wouldn't get things wrong only because you're familiar with the tropes that "work," so you'd mimic them and get the expected result.

Here are two videos that dive into the tropes and conventions that focus first on the effect, then on the music:

 

Check these out and then think again about what -you- want to do as a composer. What are your priorities? Who are you writing music for?

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Another thought to consider is, what are some melodies that YOU have found astonishing, and why did you think so? For me, astonishment means initial surprise, followed immediately by a sense of "getting it", and then by "I wouldn't have thought of that, and yet it works!" A couple of examples that come to mind are Peter's theme from Peter and the Wolf, and (this one's more obscure) the slow second melody from the "Intermezzo Interrotto" movement of Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra, which both astonished me because of the unexpected harmonic displacements. One of the reasons I think not a lot of people are expressing astonishment at your melodies is that they're built on pretty standard harmonies that don't go very far afield (like a lot of rock and pop), and so, to be honest, they're pretty predictable.

The best way to begin to write good music is to be aware of a lot of good music and conscious of what makes it good. And to begin with, "good" can simply mean that you like it.

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On 12/19/2021 at 8:34 PM, Transcended Dimensions said:

Now, I no longer think my melodies are astonishing. Why is that? Well, if they were astonishing, you and others would be astonished by them. Also, I no longer think they convey what I thought they conveyed.

If someone paints a painting of the Grand Canyon, does that mean that you are automatically astonished by it?  The Grand Canyon surely is so magnificent and immense that it should be astonishing right?  But there is no guarantee that someone witnessing the Grand Canyon will find it astonishing, much less when they look at the painting which might not be of the same quality as the real thing.  Music does not have such obvious and easily communicable designs as goals of its transmission (unless it's a programmatic piece complete with program notes and what to listen for and what the music symbolizes outside of itself).

15 hours ago, Transcended Dimensions said:

As you can see, when determining whether a melody, song, or certain product is good or astonishing, you must go by what most people think.

I don't agree.  I think the most important thing in any creative endeavor is whether you, as the creator, find your creation to be to your own satisfaction.  Whether other people find it enjoyable or not is a circumstance of their inner state and whether they are in a state which places them in a position to experience your creation the way it was intended.  Given that your own personal experience has a certain level of objectivity gained from feedback (which most composers these days have a direct connection to through being automatically being able to hear their composition immediately as they are composing it - something which I think can be detrimental to the musical imagination), being satisfied with your own creation should be goal and main focus of creation.  Other people's experience of your creation is outside of your control.  Imagine instead that you do in fact succeed at your goal of making others feel astonished by your melodies - what good would that be to you if in time you grow to dislike your own music (as I've heard of many composers who have experienced such a decline)?  Furthermore - would other people truly be able to communicate to you that they really find your melodies astonishing?  What kind of response would really be satisfactory to you and would people go to such lengths to really communicate their astonishment to your satisfaction?

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35 minutes ago, PeterthePapercomPoser said:

If someone paints a painting of the Grand Canyon, does that mean that you are automatically astonished by it?  The Grand Canyon surely is so magnificent and immense that it should be astonishing right?  But there is no guarantee that someone witnessing the Grand Canyon will find it astonishing, much less when they look at the painting which might not be of the same quality as the real thing.  Music does not have such obvious and easily communicable designs as goals of its transmission (unless it's a programmatic piece complete with program notes and what to listen for and what the music symbolizes outside of itself).

I don't agree.  I think the most important thing in any creative endeavor is whether you, as the creator, find your creation to be to your own satisfaction.  Whether other people find it enjoyable or not is a circumstance of their inner state and whether they are in a state which places them in a position to experience your creation the way it was intended.  Given that your own personal experience has a certain level of objectivity gained from feedback (which most composers these days have a direct connection to through being automatically being able to hear their composition immediately as they are composing it - something which I think can be detrimental to the musical imagination), being satisfied with your own creation should be goal and main focus of creation.  Other people's experience of your creation is outside of your control.  Imagine instead that you do in fact succeed at your goal of making others feel astonished by your melodies - what good would that be to you if in time you grow to dislike your own music (as I've heard of many composers who have experienced such a decline)?  Furthermore - would other people truly be able to communicate to you that they really find your melodies astonishing?  What kind of response would really be satisfactory to you and would people go to such lengths to really communicate their astonishment to your satisfaction?

 

I like the fact tho this thread raises so many fundamental questions about being a composer!

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Well I do think that if you want to make 'astonishing melodies' to a greater audience of people who don't necessarily know much about music there are for sure some clear 'dont's' if you are likely to succeed. 'Dont's' can lead to do's who direct a certain path. To give an example: I think some of the music of Webern is beautiful in a certain sense. Yet I don't the  larger classical audience agrees and I don't think they ever will!

Also I think some people might be left cold by the melody most of them, in the West, do hear if it aims for something beautiful or not. Humans are able to perceive if something is aiming for beauty even when they think themselves it is ugly! Weird mind we have... 

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18 hours ago, Jan-Peter said:

One way forward in this discussion: tell us what kind of moods you want to convey with your music and melodies and we might be able to help you.

 

The moods I wish to convey are otherworldly. Some of these moods are powerful and/or profound. I'm unable to fully describe these moods because there are just certain moods we can't articulate. Now, there'll be other moods I wish to convey, such as happiness or drama. But, I mostly wish to convey those otherworldly moods.

Quote

It will help to give us the sheetmusic.

I'll just give you the music sheet to my 1st melody, which I thought was a profound, otherworldly melody. The music sheet is the file attached to this post.

Quote

Why did you choose this or that note and not another one?

My choice of notes is purely based on instinct/inspiration alone. I channel powerful and/or profound emotion in creating melodies in my head. In other words, I let the emotion/inspiration alone create the melodies. From there, I transcribe them. Now, since my melodies were spawned from powerful and/or profound emotion, I automatically assumed they were powerful and/or profound melodies. In other words, I assumed my melodies matched the emotion that was channeled in creating them. I thought my powerful and/or profound emotions were taking on a musical form. But, I was wrong, since people don't think my melodies are powerful and/or profound. Neither do they think they convey the scenes I've described. I've channeled emotion in creating melodies for specific scenes, and I assumed these created melodies conveyed said scenes. But, I was wrong.

9 hours ago, Tom Statler said:

Another thought to consider is, what are some melodies that YOU have found astonishing, and why did you think so? For me, astonishment means initial surprise, followed immediately by a sense of "getting it", and then by "I wouldn't have thought of that, and yet it works!" A couple of examples that come to mind are Peter's theme from Peter and the Wolf, and (this one's more obscure) the slow second melody from the "Intermezzo Interrotto" movement of Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra, which both astonished me because of the unexpected harmonic displacements. One of the reasons I think not a lot of people are expressing astonishment at your melodies is that they're built on pretty standard harmonies that don't go very far afield (like a lot of rock and pop), and so, to be honest, they're pretty predictable.

The best way to begin to write good music is to be aware of a lot of good music and conscious of what makes it good. And to begin with, "good" can simply mean that you like it.

 

I find certain video game and anime theme songs astonishing. When I say I find them astonishing, I mean I love them. I love them because of the mood they convey. For example, there are theme songs for evil anime characters, which convey a badass mood, and that's why I love these themes. Most people love them as well because they have many likes and few dislikes on youtube.

 

Melody1.png

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'Otherworldly' is a vague term, profound too. All sorts of things can be profound and/or otherworldly. If a composer can specify what he is trying to convey he can also think how to do this. There are tho certain musical elements people probably are going to feel certain things, much used in filmmusic these days. There is such thing as music psychology. Sorry to refer to Wikipedia but let it lead to something more sustainable🙂(look for the part on the structural feautures): https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_and_emotion

If you want to do 'otherworldly' stuff something you could think about is tempo. If the tempo is below 60 bpm, our lowest heartbeat, humans can enter more easily in a 'otherworldly' state of mind. You could experiment with that.

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Now, I'm going to clarify a few things. Firstly, when I say I wish to compose astonishing music, I simply mean music that many people will love (music that has many likes and few dislikes). Secondly, when I said my 1st melody was profound, I meant it was much better than some shallow melody. There's shallow music, which conveys a shallow mood. For example, there's lame, dull music on the radio, which conveys a shallow mood. But, then there's profound music, which conveys a profound mood. An example of profound music would be Michael Jackson's "Man in the Mirror." Even without the lyrics, it's still profound. It conveys a much more profound (a much better) mood than some lame, dull song on the radio. Thus, it's a much better song that deeply moves the audience.

Now, when I said my 1st melody was profound, I wasn't saying my other melodies were shallow. I was just saying they weren't as good, since they don't convey a mood that's as good (as profound) as what my 1st melody conveys. But, people don't think it's a profound melody. They think it's lame and uninteresting. So, I was wrong when I said it's profound, and I was also wrong when I said it's an astonishing and otherworldly melody. With that being said, I'm going to discuss another thing. I was using pure instinct alone in creating my melodies. Allow me to explain. I'm going to use rage as an example. If you're enraged, then there's 2 ways you can instinctively express that rage. These ways are non-intellectual, since they're instinctive (don't require any thought).

The 1st way would be yelling, punching, frowning, etc. The 2nd way would be creating a melody in your head. My assumption was that practically anyone can naturally/instinctively create a profound, astonishing melody that conveys rage by using the 2nd way/method. I assumed this because I thought creating melodies in one's head was a matter of one's own artistic instincts. So, I thought I was naturally creating a profound, otherworldly melody in my head. I transcribed this melody, added in the proper chords using Hookpad, and shared it with others. But, oddly, others don't think it's a profound, otherworldly melody. Others also don't like my other melodies, and they say they don't convey the scenes I've described. So, clearly, I don't have this natural ability of creating astonishing melodies in my head that convey what I want to convey.

With that being said, I'm going to discuss one last thing. Some people would say my melodies are too simplistic to be astonishing, and they'd ask me why I thought they were astonishing, despite their simplicity. Well, it's because a work of art doesn't have to be a complicated masterpiece to be astonishing. There are simplistic works of art, such as simple melodies and songs, that are astonishing, profound, and memorable. There are also melodies and songs that are predictable, and many of them are astonishing, profound, and memorable. My melodies are predictable. But, I still thought they were great. As it turns out, they're nothing great or remotely good.

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'Firstly, when I say I wish to compose astonishing music, I simply mean music that many people will love (music that has many likes and few dislikes).'

you need to actively build a fanbase if you want this. It doesn't come automatically, genius or not.

'the audience'

There is no such thing as 'the audience'. There might be people who think what you do is profound. But you need to find them.

A lot of composers, or just lets say all, need a lot of practice if they want to convey on paper the things they have in mind. It takes practice man! Just like an instrument. Even if you take a genius as Mozart, if you look at his early work it is great for a child but his later work grew far more mature. If he choosed not to compose after an early age we probably wouldn't heard about him today. To a certain extent the struggle to get on paper what you have in mind is a struggle which a composer always/most of the time has all of his or her composing life. You want to be in a 'place' in which you have a high ambition to pull your creativity upwards. Don't go for easy!

 

 

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I actually have a short ebook/course coming out in the next few weeks about this very subject, which seeks to remove a lot of the vagueness and subjective terminology in what goes into actually composing a strong "tune"; something most composers today struggle with.

The good news is, it's something that can be taught. There are numerous commonalities between classic folk songs we all know, Beethoven, and Britney Spears.

I won't give it all away for free here of course, but here's an important point to ponder:

When somebody taps the Star Wars theme or the Imperial March on a table, I can tell what it is just by that.

I could not do the same with the melodies you have here.

 

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6 hours ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

When somebody taps the Star Wars theme or the Imperial March on a table, I can tell what it is just by that.

So you can recognize absurdly popular film music by just their rhythms? Such skill, no wonder you're writing/making a short ebook/course(?).

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On 12/29/2021 at 4:27 AM, Jan-Peter said:

'Firstly, when I say I wish to compose astonishing music, I simply mean music that many people will love (music that has many likes and few dislikes).'

you need to actively build a fanbase if you want this. It doesn't come automatically, genius or not.

'the audience'

There is no such thing as 'the audience'. There might be people who think what you do is profound. But you need to find them.

A lot of composers, or just lets say all, need a lot of practice if they want to convey on paper the things they have in mind. It takes practice man! Just like an instrument. Even if you take a genius as Mozart, if you look at his early work it is great for a child but his later work grew far more mature. If he choosed not to compose after an early age we probably wouldn't heard about him today. To a certain extent the struggle to get on paper what you have in mind is a struggle which a composer always/most of the time has all of his or her composing life. You want to be in a 'place' in which you have a high ambition to pull your creativity upwards. Don't go for easy!

 

 

 

Actually, practice alone will get me nowhere because I'll just continue creating melodies that I think are astonishing and convey what I want to convey, when they really don't. So, I'll need more musical knowledge, in addition to practice. I'll need to know how to create astonishing melodies and songs that convey what I want to convey. By the way, I said earlier that the moods I mostly wish to convey are otherworldly. When I say "otherworldly," I mean "from another dimension." Now, I don't wish to convey otherworldly moods in general. There are specific otherworldly moods I wish to convey. When composers make music, they often wish to convey specific moods. For example, John Williams didn't want to create any mystical theme in general. He wanted to create a specific mystical theme (a theme that conveys the world of Harry Potter). As for these specific otherworldly moods I wish to convey, I'm unable to describe them. I'm also unable to describe the other specific moods I wish to convey.

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9 hours ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

Yeah, I'd recommend you check it out when it comes out. I think you would find it would improve your own skill greatly.

 

I'm quite skeptical, to put it lightly.

 

19 hours ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

I won't give it all away for free here of course

If whatever it is is so simple as to be potentially spoiled by a forum post, then I'm very doubtful there's much going on that hasn't been said a billion times before. Additionally, if you followed your own method wouldn't this mean that you're capable, in theory, of making melodies and somesuch that rival those in, say, Star wars? I think this is all sort of a joke, but you said:

19 hours ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

which seeks to remove a lot of the vagueness and subjective terminology in what goes into actually composing a strong "tune"

So uh, how would that work? I mean if the answer is "buy my book and find out!" then no thanks, unless you got some kind of evidence that what you're doing is actually different or meaningful, it's just another book to the pile.

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2 hours ago, SSC said:

I'm quite skeptical, to put it lightly.

Like I give a damn what you are "skeptical" of or not.

2 hours ago, SSC said:

If whatever it is is so simple as to be potentially spoiled by a forum post, then I'm very doubtful there's much going on that hasn't been said a billion times before. Additionally, if you followed your own method wouldn't this mean that you're capable, in theory, of making melodies and somesuch that rival those in, say, Star wars?

You're a fuking moron, dude. That's why I and most of the active members here have you on ignore.

Yes, I wrote a complete ebook and course to teach beginners (like yourself) about writing melodies with the same kind of energy and catchiness of something like Star Wars, the different theory and technical considerations and putting my own 20 years of writing music experience, which I got my first professional jobs when I was still in highschool, and perspective into it and don't feel inclined to give it away for free on a forum post.

I know that irks you since you're one of these commie types, which is also why you loathe the notion that anyone on here is superior to you in skill (almost everyone is); that you're not "equal".

But hey, why don't you just give that knowledge away for free in this thread, then?

Because you don't know sh!t, and are of no help to anyone, that's why. 

2 hours ago, SSC said:

So uh, how would that work? I mean if the answer is "buy my book and find out!" then no thanks, unless you got some kind of evidence that what you're doing is actually different or meaningful, it's just another book to the pile.

I don't have to justify or prove anything to the likes of you.

Though I find this claim of yours hilarious since you doubtlessly consume tons of the same recycled corporate garbage yourself.

Here's this free market thing in action: Don't buy it, a$$hole.

Hey, let's call up every teacher in wherever you live and make sure they have your approval before offering lessons, shall we? They'd tell you to go fck yourself, as you rightly should. 

If it's "Just another book on the pile" maybe you should reach into that pile, because it's obvious from your work that you never have.

Now fck off, crack open another bottle of soylent and go make another lo-fi ambient tune or meager attempt at rock music that still, after all this time, sounds like a 13-year-old who just pirated garage band whilst acting like some snide, accomplished guru. 

Edited by AngelCityOutlaw
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1 hour ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

You're a fuking moron, dude. That's why I and most of the active members here have you on ignore.

And you're not a very smart businessman if that's how you treat potential customers, just sayin'. Also, if you have me on ignore...why are you replying to me?

 

1 hour ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

Here's this free market thing in action: Don't buy it, a$$hole.

I mean it's pretty great that you fly off the handle so easily for something so minor as me posing pretty tame questions. It's also great that you do it in a public forum, so that anytime anyone thinks of doing business with you, I can just point at this ridiculous outburst and say, "You wanna give THIS guy money?"

 

Public relations, man. If you're going to start doing business, then conduct yourself like a professional.

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1 hour ago, SSC said:

And you're not a very smart businessman if that's how you treat potential customers, just sayin'.

We both know you're no potential customer and this was just your usual sarcastic, a$$hole attitude you are famous for.

Did you forget how "skeptical" you are? :rolleyes:

1 hour ago, SSC said:

I mean it's pretty great that you fly off the handle so easily for something so minor as me posing pretty tame questions

Let me refresh your memory

16 hours ago, SSC said:

So you can recognize absurdly popular film music by just their rhythms? Such skill, no wonder you're writing/making a short ebook/course(?).

There is no one on here with an IQ low enough to not to see that this is your usual snide BS, especially anyone who has been here any length of time.

and we all know that had I seriously entertained your sarcasm, you'd just be arguing me whilst not knowing wtf you're talking about, as usual.

1 hour ago, SSC said:

Public relations, man. If you're going to start doing business, then conduct yourself like a professional.

I've been doing business for years.

You've not had anyone outside of family and friends, if that, buy any of your bandcamp albums out of pity.

You're not some potential client, and you're not even a halfway-decent guy. Rather, you are the most narcissistic, belligerent user on these forums.

And you want to talk about "PR" and public image lol.

 

Edited by AngelCityOutlaw
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1 minute ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

We both know you're no potential customer and this was just your usual sarcastic, a$$hole attitude you are famous for.

Funny thing is, I can be skeptical, but I was willing to give you a chance. Hell, I still am! I mean, I can ignore the petty insults and overreactions and if you actually explain what your method/book/etc is about or how it works then that would be interesting.

 

3 minutes ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

There is no one on here with an IQ low enough to not to see that this is your usual snide BS, especially anyone who has been here any length of time.

But it was also my point. I don't see how recognizing very famous music through their rhythms means anything at all. I was right to be snide, seeing as the following outburst turned out to be hilarious.

 

7 minutes ago, AngelCityOutlaw said:

You're not some potential client

Yes, you made that quite certain. I don't tend to want to give money to people who attack me with lies and nonsense. I mean, it's funny, but unless you're a professional clown, I don't think you want my money for that.

 

Also, aren't you supposed to be ignoring me?

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1 hour ago, SSC said:

I don't see how recognizing very famous music through their rhythms means anything at all

Yeah, I'd suppose you don't because you have the worldview, which we've discussed in past threads, that prohibits you from finding any meaning that isn't derived from abstract conceptualism/obscurantism that enables the elevation of mediocrity to the status of the greats in the minds of dregs who care more about propaganda than craftsmanship because quality is "subjective" remember?

A rational person would come to the conclusion that basically every enduring, iconic melody beloved by people around the world across generations can be recognized even just by its rhythm and would say that obviously, the rhythm of the melody is an important consideration in making one that the audience is apt to remember.

Your reasoning is "It's cuz it's famous" and acting like there's no way there could be a correlation. 

The best part of this is, what I refer to (and this is just one aspect of melody composition), and the importance of it was standard knowledge among composers even just 30 years ago, when standards were higher, and yet here you are, suggesting it is a dubious or controversial point.

Which suggests you were unaware of it until now, in all your cocksure, infinite wisdom. :rolleyes: 

On the flip side, it illustrates the need for it to be taught again, among other topics.

It would be one thing if you just admitted humble ignorance, even feigned interest and moved on or whatever like a normal person. Instead, you came in with your usual snide belligerence and then try to pretend like I'm just attacking you out of the blue.

Standard routine with you. Be an a$$hole and then play the victim.

Anyway, natter on about whatever you want. I have no further need to read your posts.

Edited by AngelCityOutlaw
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