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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/17/2019 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    The suite's finally up! A lot of movements have been posted here already, but it is a different experience all the way through (if I do say so myself 🙂). Movements 3 and 5 have not been uploaded here before if you want to skip to those, though. Enjoy!
  2. 5 points
    Hi all, I've not posted anything here for quite a while, been busy with other things, but I've also been working to finish my first fully orchestrated piano concerto. The first movement was posted here about a year ago, but the second and third movements are new. The first movement has also been edited and hopefully improved as I added a short cadenza that I felt was missing from the first movement, as well as changing the odd passage here and there. Anyway, I'm pretty pleased with the final edit. As always, any comments are welcome and gratefully received.
  3. 4 points
    Here is a little impromptu I wrote a few weeks ago. What do you think ?
  4. 4 points
    I see. Then you obviously do not require our feedback here. Good luck
  5. 4 points
    "Marcia Funebre" for Piano Here a little funeral march that proably I will generate a more developed pice from it: Marcia Funebre (3).mp3 Marcia Funebre.pdf Open for suggestion and feedback! ADVICE! The dynimic notation is still not finished.
  6. 4 points
    The second movement of my piano suite. It'll be released as a full piece in about a week or so, but this is my second favorite movement in and of itself! I know it's based off of some prime form I was working off of, but I don't remember what it is now 😅
  7. 4 points
    I don't know how much music history you've studied up to this point, but this whole notion of material-based originality came from the genesis of the Romantic era, where the advancement of middle-class music making along with the general advancement of music printing/publishing combined. Composers started using super fancy/exotic-sounding titles and used increased harmonic changes to be more expressive and have their pick at the newly free market. I'll elaborate on my own opinions/answer more of the proposed questions if this discussion gets more lively, but I'm more a fan of the way the Classical era dealt with originality, where quality was based upon how well you could use old forms and conventions in your own style/ways. It doesn't sound very modern to us because it was their styles, but Haydn's and Beethoven's music were pretty novel when they were written. The modern era has taken this Romantic ideal of expression and newness to its extreme, trying to push progress without having the patience for it. The elitism and high-artness of modern classical music generally glosses over the music most people will listen to; how subtle its changes are to formulas, but how effectively catchy the songs are. Maybe my thoughts on this will change over time.
  8. 4 points
    Some short pieces. Six Piano Pieces.pdf 01 Aeolian (Winds).mp3 02 The Hummingbird's Phrygian Flight.mp3 03 Quick Diminished Changes.mp3 04 Can We Be Friends.mp3 05 Longing Worlds.mp3 06 Gemini II.mp3
  9. 3 points
    I think the best word to describe my music is "neo-romantic." I write music that I feel is easy and pleasing to listen to - not necessarily 'light music' but not avant-garde. My style is not so similar to Romantic composers as to be reminiscent of any one, rather in a review I received here I was told that: "One minute I'm hearing Mendelssohn's influence, the next a little Tchaikovsky." I believe it was @J. Lee Graham who said that, a composer who is obviously also a traditional tonalist. My biggest works are largely Romantic. There are some minor 20th century inflections that I add, such as an unusual modulation or chord choice. I also like to utilise new instruments such as the Contraforte, or ones which slipped into obscurity during the Romantic period such as the alto trombone. NB: The alto trombone is a wonderful addition to the orchestral brass section. Listen to many orchestral pieces from the Classical era, including Beethoven's symphonies to hear it in action. In chamber works however, there is a larger scope of influence, especially from the music of Scotland, where I live. Classical pieces that I have written include sections with common Scottish musical ideas, and a string sextet that I am writing has the finale as a harmonised Strathspey dance. In the age of the internet and globalisation, we have a huge range of musical influences from throughout the world. Ethnomusicology is a growing area of study, and we composers have the freedom to write whatever we want, whether from orchestras with oboes and strings, or for ensembles with sitar, gamelan and electronics. What we should never forget is the universal language of music. Atonality has become common and respected, and this poses the risk of us tonalists being forgotten or actively disregarded. The worst thing that I could hear is not an experimentalist piece by Stockhausen. It's not a calculated serialist sonata. It's just four words: "Find your own voice." Who has the right to dictate anyone's compositional style?
  10. 3 points
    Just a little sad flute solo.
  11. 3 points
    As the title implies, it truly is silent
  12. 3 points
    Hello guys, I am totally new here and I am really impressed by discovering such an active forum with so many talents! I am really surprised, didn't know there was such a place on the web! Anyway, I am a youngish composer (31yo), I started composing around 2 years a go (but play the piano since many years). I have composed a good amount of stuff but my favourite is probably Math Piano Rock. This is inspired by Math Rock, a fast paced genre with frequent change of rythm and no lyrics (I hate lyrics!), but also Prokofiev and Bartok. The piece is *difficult*! The video below is performed by a software - but I have actually played it live a couple of times (you can see in my channel some videos where I do that, if you are interested). I am always looking to opinion, suggestions and ideas!
  13. 3 points
    Hi Everyone, I just recently finished my first "exact" composition for solo piano . Prior to this, I have been improvising and composing various themes for many years but this is the first time I went about trying to put together a coherent piece and notating it. I would love to hear what people think about it. Here's a link to my own performance ( with score) on youtube: Also, here's a link to the score (also attached as pdf) : https://musescore.com/user/25828516/scores/5759589/s/0aktCw I realize that some of the more difficult sections aren't a 100% clean in my performance. So those interested, could listen to a "100% accurate" but somewhat stiff/mechanical software (musescore) playback to evaluate those sections. ( I did my best to put hidden instructions in the software so it sounds less robotic ). I'm completely self-taught in music theory/composition and am trying to evaluate where I stand currently as far as my compositional skills are concerned. So, any kind of feedback would be highly appreciated. Also, here's a short description of the piece: The title of this piece alludes to the tendancy of this piece to drift from one style to another, from music of one period to another, from one mood to another. The music also tends to "drift" from a standard waltz form to music which has little resemblance to a waltz ( but may still maintain a slight waltz pulse) . Thank you very much !!
  14. 3 points
    Ray Bradbury once said, "Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity." And Albert Einstein said something similar: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." The vast majority of your posts on this forum display your detailed—and oftentimes dizzying—thought processes. But all of this planning is honoring the "servant" and ignoring the "gift." For the most part, the works you produce sound rigid, analytical, and unfeeling—which I don't think truly reflects who you are—because you can't plan out creativity. It is 100% informed by our intuitive mind, not our rational mind. You have a vast understanding of music theory: your rational mind at work. If you want to become a better composer, I advise you to start using your intuitive mind. In other words, stop thinking and start creating. I apologize for being so blunt, but I do understand where you're coming from. It's very difficult not to research every aspect of something before sitting down to do it. It makes us feel competent (or, rather, it keeps us from feeling incompetent). If we can totally understand something it has no chance of overwhelming us, or so we tell ourselves. As comforting as that may seem, it only hinders us in the creative process. Trust me. I do agree with @Luis Hernández, @aMusicComposer and @Markus Boyd. You pepper the forum with requests for advice but only respond to either defend yourself or if someone you view as competent provides feedback. I truly don't believe your intention is to put all of us off like that. Please try to put yourself in our shoes; we are only trying to help you.
  15. 3 points
    Wrote this last night, I'm kind of excited about it. Anxious to hear what you guys think.
  16. 3 points
    Jesus, man, how much are you paying for this?
  17. 3 points
    Composition completed on 10/28/2015 You also can watch this piece here -
  18. 3 points
    This was written in November 19, 2012. I was quite prolific and experimental in writing music during 2012-2014, and while I was just playing around with melodies along the higher register, I decided to write this one out. While this one's a very short piece, it was among the very few ones that were actually completed, so I wanna share it to the forum. Hope you like it 🙂
  19. 3 points
    The difficulty is that when trying to be original, you have no control over what your contemporaries are doing. Ideas don't appear out of a vacuum. We are all the products of our cumulative experiences. So it's very likely that the same influences that nudge you towards writing a certain kind of music are acting on other composers in the same way. There are a LOT of people on the planet at this point in history, and it ends up being a numbers game. And today we live in a globally connected world. We don't have the comfort of long periods of musical isolation from the neighboring cathedral towns or royal courts while we gather our thoughts and develop our ideas. If you're working on it, someone else is going to hear about it. If someone else is working on it, it's hard to stop their ideas from leaking into your inner soundscape. We also have no control over what happens after us. Trying to strategize the best direction for your music now, in the context of music history two hundred years from now, is a pretty impossible task. If you've got the foresight to solve that one, can you please stop pursuing composing and sort out world peace instead? What seems original now may completely miss the boat for what ends up being significant. I say, just write what you like. One of the best predictors of being important to the direction of music in your time is to write enough music to get good, and to get good enough to be performed, filed away in music libraries, and passed around to other musicians so you can influence other people. If you hate what you are writing, you won't be able to stick around long enough to get good. You'll quit before you get started. So compose music that you find moving, don't quit to spend your free time watching TV, and if you are very lucky, you may stumble on something original enough to move the gears of progress a notch.
  20. 3 points
    This is a great discussion point - and one that I think the world of composition needs. There is no secret that I am a tonal composer. It's just the music I enjoy writing and listening to. As a composer, whichever combination of tones you use will create something that is unique to you, whether is be 5, 7, 8, or 12. Provided you are not copying a piece directly, then it is original enough. The biggest problem comes from exposure. Why would a (paying) audience go to see a symphony by an unknown composer which sounded Classical, rather than their favourite Mozart one. Here lies the problem with originality - performances. Bottom line, if you want to write tonally, do it. It's still original. However atonal music is more likely to be performed, which brings me to the next point. I, as a composer, want to write music that I enjoy. If someone tells you what style of music you should write, then that will ruin the enjoyment of music for you. This is the problem with conservatoires, who tend to only accept people with an avant-garde style which they consider to be more original. Not to attack John Cage, but silence? Seriously!? Disclaimer: I mean no disrespect to atonal/avant-garde composers. You are all equally skilled and creative. I just personally don't like the style. If even one other person besides me listens to my music and enjoys it, then I feel like I have succeeded in a way. I would like to get my music performed but composition isn't my main pursuit in music so I don't mind as much. New music ensembles tend to only want to perform avant-garde pieces, and traditional orchestras generally do not accept pieces from budding composers. As a composer, I want to reach out to other musicians and show them what I have worked on. You could say I am trying to "revolutionise music" because I want to show the world that tonal composers still flourish, even though they are looked down on by competitions and festivals. I thought about this a few months ago. I love the works of the greats from the last few centuries. It appeals strongly to me, because my ear - as most ears do - perceives it as right. Tonal music is designed to be pleasant - but that doesn't mean it is limited to what most non musicians think classical music is. Take two birds sitting on a branch. One sings tonally, the other races rats over a finish line and sings the notes in the order that they place. Which one will get a mate? The ear - our ear, an ant's ear, a bird's ear - likes the harmonic relationship between the frequencies of a tonal scale. My style, as I have said before, is tonal, but I like to experiment with the changing harmonies caused by a chromatic movement. Listen to this simply beautiful piece by Grieg. I didn't play it for a while, because from looking at the score I could see it had a lot of chromaticism. But it is still tonal, and this is what I try to write. I don't count myself as a pastiche of Grieg, because I draw my style from another source. Scotland has a rich traditional music heritage, and if you listen carefully to some of my most recent music (not posted here yet) you can hear the influences from playing fiddle in a school folk band. I even write specific Scottish traditional pieces to play in the group, although that is not the main part of my output. My style? Tonal×Accidentals×Scottish Music Music is so subjective. Thanks for sticking with me, it's my longest post ever.
  21. 3 points
    Hi all! I'm new here, and I really wish I'd discovered this community much sooner! I love classical music but, as a violist, my largest complaint has been the lack of stirring, cinematic viola concerti. Well, what's a composer to do? So here's my stab at a full-length viola concerto. I've named it Yfirsést (pronounced ih-ver-syest), the Icelandic word for "overlooked," and an all-too common feeling among violists. This is the first movement, and it resounds with the struggle of overcoming mediocrity and being seen for what you are. (I couldn't tell you what composer it sounds like, because to me, it sounds like me. 🙂) I appreciate your feedback, and especially taking the time to listen! I'll upload the second and third movements (along with the scores for all 3) later.
  22. 3 points
    Concerto per violino, archi e bass continuo in b minor "Paradiso e inferno". written 20.06.19 - 25.06.19. Been some time since i wrote a concerto, so here is my summer contribution. Three part concerto written in the late italian school. I. Allegro - paradiso: 4/4 time, livly tempo and fugures, high in the register of the violin (Heaven it is!), the triumph key of d major. II. Adagio - cadere dalla grazia (fall from grace) 4/4 time. slow pace, rethorical use of rets, b, minor III. Vivace - inferno, 4/4 time, fast pace, slaming fugres, chromatic downward passages (going down to hell), b minor Please tell me what you think SimenN
  23. 3 points
    I've got one more sonata to share here. This is a 2015 composition. It was performed as part of my trio performance in 2018, but we didn't get around to making a house recording of it, so the performance will have to do in spite of some shortcomings in both the performance and recording. Remembering that the balance was piano-heavy in the violin sonata I had played in the same venue some years earlier, I placed the recorder quite close to the cello this time. Too close, as it turns out. One of these times I'll get it right; this seems to be a difficult venue to record in, despite the excellent live acoustics. For those expecting some modern elements in my writing, you'll note that there are a number of aleatoric elements, including but not limited to baby cries, pages shuffling, various weird noises, an early entry, and some wrong notes (all completely intentional, of course). The piece itself is in three movements. The first is a rather slow, brooding sonata-allegro. The second is an ABABA rondoish form with alternating slow and quick segments, and the final movement is also best described as a rondo, though it doesn't cleanly match the standard 5-part or 7-part form of Classical period works. It's one of my darker works and likely not as appealing as other things I've written, but I've finally decided I like it enough to share it here.
  24. 2 points
    Here’s another one with heavy Beatles influence. I’m interested to know how the balance is and if the bass is too loud. Thanks for listening.
  25. 2 points
    Sometimes inspiration comes from different places: a car passing by in front of you, leaves rustling in the wind, the username of a member of an online forum, or simply... it just is. My first sonata was inspired by one of these three things. Ironically, as long as I've been composing, this is my first... complete (well, somewhat, I'll probably renovate some of the movements later) piano sonata. I. Allegretto Grazioso: The entire sonata rests on the motif found in the bass. 5 simple notes. The motif in this movement is treated to development in a type of hybridized sonata form. II. Adagio Sostenuto: This is one of the movements that I'll probably strengthen later. The form is basic ABA'. I wanted the A section to have a solemn quality to it. Resignation. The middle section introduces some new material -but again is heavily resting on the 5 note motif found in the first movement. III. Presto - Andante con moto: The five note motif becomes the basis of the scalar material utilized in the first half of this movement. Despite being a tad basic, it provided some interesting sonorities -particularly with the infusion of chromaticism. The second half of this movement features snapshots of material utilized in the previous two movements (for the sake of maintaining cohesion throughout the piece). All in all, I'm fairly satisfied with this work. I'll most likely update the second movement -and the second half of the third. Hope you all enjoy!
  26. 2 points
    Gradually trying to work up the keys. This nocturne is again an update like the Eb major one was. Its taking ages. Not sure about the time signatures or ending. No slurs as the software treats the slurs as a pedal sometimes. This piece might be a bit of a mess but don't know. Feedback is greatly appreciated. Thanks very much.
  27. 2 points
    Well said. Indeed we should just write the music that we want to! Composing began as a little pursuit for me, but now that I take it much more seriously I'm thinking always more about these things. This is a great discussion point you have here!
  28. 2 points
    Ok, I'll put in my tuppenceworth because yes, it's sometimes enlightening to learn how composers view their own music. I hope others add to it. The nearest popular label is Impressionist, when not being a hack. Not “programme music” though. I suppose by definition it’s atonal because I don’t write with key in mind though it can pass through tonal moments. I don’t use barlines in the initial stages of composing. Sometimes use coloured pastels on grey or black paper. It’s all sound organisation - sometimes with a utility purpose, sometimes for an audience whether live or public exposure as a recording. I’m not happy writing in keys unless it’s light music. Anything that makes a sound is a potential source. I rarely write for full orchestra now except to keep in practice and with the hope that the County orchestra might one day perform it. Otherwise I like ensemble writing, anything from string quartet to about 15 players. I’ve tried applying formal structures and usually fail. Tending to through-compose and working in motifs, it’s more about proportion to me. I'm hopeless at melody writing hence the few solos I've composed - at least to try. As I commented earlier, the music comes from my inner ear and the physical me is there to capture what I can of it. I suppose to those emotionally responsive it "comes from the heart" - mainly!
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
    A new piece. Exploring the use of notes in complexity and sparseness
  31. 2 points
    Thank you for your kind review ! 🙂 I know that some of my pieces are truly inspired from other composers but it is something that I accept. I just try to master different styles in aim to develop my own.
  32. 2 points
    @Lotsy piano @Guillem82 That is called ritardation (when the non-chord tone resolves upwards) or appoggiatura (when it resolves downwards). I think you can write A# - B in the context of C maj (for example with a G or G7). In m. 62 there is a false appoggiatura because the A# is, in fact a Bb, part of C7, and it would be odd an appoggiatura resolving an augmented second.
  33. 2 points
    Hello everybody! I've just posted a video biography about Mozart Camargo Guarnieri, one of the greatest Brazilian composers. He has been quite forgotten lately, so I decided to make a video to share his life and some of his works. I also intend to do various other videos about Brazilian classical music, so (sorry for the advertisement) I'd ask you to consider subscribing to my Youtube channel if you are interested in this subject. Best reagards to you all! Jean.
  34. 2 points
    Hello Markus! I thought I am going to give you a review too, and well, I can't.. I think it's very clear which of us can teach way more about baroque style to the other, so all I could do at the moment is to Like this and to say: Hats off, Sir! 🙂 (PS. I'm going to remember you if I stuck with a baroque composition)
  35. 2 points
    Hi all, this is my first post here. Was hoping for some feedback on this latest attempt at putting the whole orchestra to work: Peace -Rob
  36. 2 points
    @Tónskáld @Monarcheon Agree. In fact, from my point of view it's a good point that what comes after the shared initial part be related to it. Transformation/development is a blurred frontier. Also, the material can be inspired in the style, for example, of the initial part, and in this case, smooth and natural transition should be in mind. Perhaps a graphic representation is the branches of a tree where the trunk is the shared material and the main branches are the parts, and the little branches internal development. In some way everything is related to the trunk. (Off topic: tree branches follow the fibonacci series pattern, often used in contermporary and even in previous periods of music. But that's another story.)
  37. 2 points
    Here is the first draft of a serenade that I have written recently for the following orchestra: 2 Flutes; Oboe da Caccia; 2 Clarinets; Horn in F; 2 Celestas; Violin I, II & III, Viola I & II; Violoncello and Double Bass. I tried to add some chromaticism into the harmony to richen the tonal landscape throughout the different ideas. I might enter this into a competition - what do you guys think?
  38. 2 points
    Hi everyone, I've been composing music for 3,5 years, but it was not until recently I decided to start uploading my music to the internet. I've never received any musical education, I had to educate myself. The first piece I decided to upload is the "Sonata for Viola and Orchestra". Please note, that even though it says sonata in the title, I wasn't sticking to any particular composition form. I would appreciate any feedback you can give me on both my orchestration and composition and your thoughts in general. For the story behind the piece, you can check the description of the video attached here. My idea behind this composition was as follows: The motif that represents life gets introduced in the first part of the composition in a major key (0:00-0:56). Then the piece switches to a minor key and a "loss" motif start playing by a solo viola, representing the losses during the war. After the second repetition of the motif (1:00-2:24), the life motif comes back now in a minor key representing that life has changed for the worse (2:24-3:15). The loss motif is then repeated again and the piece concludes on an unstable minor add9 chord to show the uncertainty of the situation (3:15-4:30). The piece: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4jGyzvWlmY&lc=z221wrhqgxznjvopt04t1aokgbir4xpajzdb5agsljhlrk0h00410 The score is attached here Edit: Uploaded the piece here as well. For the history behind it, you should still check the link Edit 2: Replaced the previous pdf file with the new one, since I found some mistakes (had incorrect crescendo markings around bars 10-11)
  39. 2 points
    Hi, everyone I would like to introduce to you my new composition. It is Ballade #2 for piano. The composition was written in late romantic style. I tried to make it in classical traditions with clear music forms and simple, understandable melodies. I hope I accessed my goals at least partially.
  40. 2 points
    @Quinn This kind of lydian feel created by 2 major chords a whole step appart over a pedal note is really nice. It's used by Joe Satriani in "Flying in a Blue Dream" almost exactly like that. Really recommend listening to that song, it's great.
  41. 2 points
    Kind of a MOR easy listening piece, with a hint of jazz.
  42. 2 points
    This song is the first in a five-movement suite inspired by my time in Iceland. The opening theme uses counterpoint and sustained notes to emulate that feeling of joy-anxiety each new day brings. There is a transitional passage that builds with anticipation into the middle theme, which is harmonically less complex than the first—this is meant to represent that feeling of unbridled peace an early morning stroll in nature brings. The middle theme is repeated in various keys and modulations before the return to the opening theme and the piece ends in a soft, arppegiated finish. Mornings anywhere are special times, but I find them particularly breathtaking in Iceland. There are so few people and so many natural phenomena that one can't help but be spiritually touched by íslensk dögun—an Icelandic dawn. (Be warned: sunrises/sunsets are difficult to catch in high summer and winter, as the sun never really rises/sets.) I couldn't resist incorporating a morning song into a suite about that lovely country! The overall style of the song is impressionistic... you likely won't come away humming any melodies, but (hopefully) you will come away with those feelings etched on your soul for a while. BTW I'm a pianist and, as such, strive to make my piano songs as enjoyable to play as possible. You'll notice quite a bit of hand-crossing, melody-driven left-hand passages, and many other "fun" effects. I think that's enough words for now. Please, enjoy and comment! I always love hearing how the piece made you feel, and what did or didn't sit well with you!
  43. 2 points
    It depends on lots of things especially tempo, dynamic and phrasing and how it connects to strong and weak beats. One could start with not exceed the bar with a slur and not have two identical consecutive pitches in a slur. Like in this piece between bar 1 vln1 D5 and bar 2 vln1 D5. Either that's a tie meaning one long note equal to 6 beats or it's two separate bows (it doesn't mean it's not legato though). Also a notation tip for Sibelius here: When inputting dynamics make sure to hold down cmd (or ctrl on windows) whilst typing 'p' or 'mp'. This makes it the right typeface and makes it play back correctly.
  44. 2 points
    This is a concertino I wrote specifically for a youth chamber orchestra. Although it's not a perfect performance, I was very pleased with the results considering the amount of rehearsal time they had. This is my personal recording of the piece from my place in the audience, so I do apologize for the fuzziness and the whispers going on around me. The name means 'Boreal Song' or 'Song of the North.' Though I generally prefer to convey my musical ideas through chord structures, this piece is more lyrical than my normal wont. There are 2 major themes and a number of motifs throughout. The piece was designed to represent the struggle of spring overcoming winter, so I hope you can hear that in the tense passages and deep yearnings of the solo cello. As always, feedback is welcome! Edit: @Maarten Bauer I just saw you put up a piece performed by a youth orchestra, too, so now it looks like I'm trying to one-up you! That wasn't my intent at all, so everyone please go listen to Maarten's piece, too!
  45. 2 points
    This is a good topic for discussion; thanks for bringing it up! I think each of us creates "original" music in the sense that we as composers create works of music that are uniquely our own. True, they may resemble certain styles and forms of other composers—I'm not sure one can ever escape that since all of our musical ideas are built upon stuff we've heard before and internalized. As we become more experienced, we're able to remove ourselves farther away from those influences, so our music slowly takes on its own voice. As to the "style" of originality as defined by the classical music elites, I'm stumped there. The style of music heralded by the elites as "purely original" is, as you mentioned, atonal. Proponents of atonal music posit that it's a musical era just like Romantic or Impressionism, but I disagree; up until the Modern/Postmodern era of classical music, composers followed the natural "rules" of music. Debussy (an Impressionist for those following along at home) did some weird things with tonality but he obeyed the rules. The human ear is wired to interpret certain pitch relationships as consonant and others as dissonant—and these days, some as purely chaotic. Modern/postmodern classical music, with its strong atonality, is the first musical movement to actually rebel against this natural rule, or at least disregard it, in the hopes of staying original. So, all this to say that modern composers have abandoned tonality because they believe there's nothing "original" left to be had there. Again, I disagree. It takes a lot more work and creative thinking to find an original voice in the world of tonality, but it's entirely possible—and very satisfying! I've a hunch that the great composers of our generation remembered 100 years down the road will not be the progressive, 12-tone serialists churning out mind-boggling, gut-wrenching cacophonies; rather, it will be those who continued to tinker with tonality and made music that meshed with the human soul. My goals are rather simple: write music that I like. I'd much prefer to revolutionize music than reach a big audience, but (for reasons mentioned above) I don't feel like that's going in the direction of the current avant-garde styles. There's still hundreds of years' worth of exploring to do in the world of tonality! So how original do we need to be? Well, be as original as you want to be! Some people create amazing works that sound like Beethoven or Mozart could have written. Others' sound like something from an outfit from Mars. The problem I find is that composers are either cliché tonal composers (little musical training) or else they're atonal. This probably has to do with the fact that atonal music is the prima donna right now among the elites; atonal music will receive the most praise (and it's difficult to criticize since it doesn't follow a lot of rules), so "serious" composers seek originality via that route. If there are atonal composers reading this, please don't get the wrong impression! I respect your compositional styles 100%; my point is that atonal music is not the sole arbiter of originality. As you might have guessed, my music is strongly tonal. However, I use a rich combination of chords throughout so it doesn't sound too cliché. In fact, I hate having to use conventional chord progressions; I strive to avoid them when I can. My works have a strong thematic element to them but are rarely melody-driven (in other words, not like Tchaikovsky and other Romantics). I also use a lot of unconventional modulations that loosely tie to the previous key. And I love counterpoint—I always try to use it when I can. It helps ensure that all players have "interesting" parts to play! I guess I'm describing Impressionism, and maybe that category best fits my musical style. Anyone is welcome to take a listen to some of my stuff and give their own opinion. 🙂
  46. 2 points
    Emanuel, please do not promote your track in my post!
  47. 2 points
    The main piece of advice I can give you is to work out your form in advance, then come up with some ideas (they can be short) to fill each section. Learning how to develop well will help make you pieces longer.
  48. 2 points
    Sinfonia Concertante in C for Oboe, Bassoon, Fortepiano, Violin, Violoncello, and Orchestra. One movement in three parts: Allegro spiritoso – Andantino grazioso – Tempo primo Scoring: Flute, Principal Oboe, Oboe II, Principal Bassoon, Bassoon II, 2 Horns in C, 2 Trumpets in C, Timpani, Fortepiano, Principal Violin, Principal Violoncello, Strings Composed: January 10 - March 10, 2017 Commissioned by Billy Traylor, Director, Austin Baroque Orchestra. The Sinfonia Concertante is a form that had its heyday of popularity in the second half of the 18th Century. It is essentially a concerto for two or more solo instruments (five in this case) with orchestral accompaniment. It is considered to have emerged from the concerto grosso of the Baroque period, and is a cross-over form incorporating elements of the concerto and the symphony. Ordinarily, as with the concerto and symphony of the same period, it is in multiple movements, usually three or more. However, the present work was conceived as a single-movement work in three contiguous parts, contrasting in key and tempo (similar to an early opera overture) at the request of the commissioner, who also requested that the entire piece be less than 10 minutes long. As is often the case, all the principal players play ripieno with the orchestra when not performing a solo part, and likewise the fortepiano plays figured continuo when not soloing. The instrumentation is nearly identical to that of the Sinfonia Concertante in B-flat (1792) by Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), the addition of the concertatofortepiano being the only difference - again at the request of the commissioner - and I studied that work extensively before and during the writing of this piece. Perhaps the most famous example of this form is the Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra (1779) by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791). There is a lot going on in this piece. Not only is the form condensed, but much of the time the texture is such that there is a very active quintet layered on top of an orchestra, as if it were a chamber work and an orchestral work all at once. I found the feedback I got from the soloists during rehearsals very interesting indeed. The oboist complained that I called for E and E-flat above high-C from him, which for a skillful player should be doable even on a period Classical oboe; and in fact he cracked both of them in performance. The bassoonist was thrilled with her part, saying that what I had written was not only reasonably playable, but very idiomatic for the instrument and a lot of fun to play. The fortepianist (who played my own Peter Fisk fortepiano for the performance) had nothing to say at all, but I got a sense that perhaps his part wasn’t demanding enough, because he was often tempted to rush the tempo. The violinist and ‘cellist both got after me for taking them too high without adequate preparation, which I found very strange; being a string player myself, I know for certain that any player worth his salt should be able to jump to a high position and begin playing without having to be led up there through a series of position shifts, even in 18th Century music. At any rate, I was not persuaded by anything I heard from the players to make even the slightest change to the music, and with a knowing smile I nodded and expressed condolences where necessary, but did nothing to assuage their discomfort where there was any. It is a concerted work after all, and meant to be challenging – and if Mozart had written it, there wouldn’t have been a peep out of anyone. This work was premiered on May 26, 2018 by the Austin Baroque Orchestra – on period instruments! It was my first performance of one of my pieces to have been performed by such an ensemble, and it was most gratifying. I have been trying to get a live recording of the piece ever since, but the Director is hesitant to give it to me because there were a few mistakes made here and there. It was an excellent performance, nonetheless, but he’s a perfectionist. I’ll keep after him! In the meantime, I hope the present electronic rendering will serve. Enjoy, and by all means let me know what you think. EDIT - I managed to obtain an amateur recording of the Austin Baroque Orchestra performing this piece, so I am replacing the electronic rendering I had attached here with it. It's not the greatest quality recording, and there are more problems with the performance than I remember there being (not the least being that in this, the second performance in San Antonio, the timpani were missing), but it has electronic rendering beat, and it gives a good idea of how the piece should sound with live instruments - and instruments of the period to boot. There is a bit of silence and tuning at the beginning - just wait it out!
  49. 2 points
    Concerto per oboe, violino, archi e basso continuo in mi minore (13.01.19 - 04.03.19) written in the late Italian language. I finally got this concerto finished. It has been a thorn in my side for two months now. No time for composing and very little inspiration. The concerto its written to the baptism of my unborn son, so I have about 4 months to edit and rehears. I. Allegro II. Adagio III. Vivace Please tell me what you think!
  50. 2 points
    There is a legend about a dialogue between Mozart and a young composer that went something like this: Young Composer: "Herr Mozart, I am thinking of writing a symphony. How should I get started?" Mozart: "A symphony is a very complex musical form and you are still young. Perhaps you should start with something simpler." Young Composer: "But Herr Mozart, you were writing symphonies when you were 8 years old!" Mozart: "Yes, but I didn’t have to ask how." This story is almost certainly apocryphal, but that doesn’t mean it is not very much the truth. You’re probably going to think I’m not being very helpful, and I’m usually very positive and encouraging; but I don’t believe there is anything anyone can tell you here that is going to edify you sufficiently that you’ll know how to write something as complex as a piano concerto upon reading it. As demonstrated above, If you have to ask how to write something, you’re not ready to write it. As Mozart may or may not have done with his young friend, I would urge you to try and write simpler things first before trying to tackle a piano concerto. I read elsewhere that you’re only 13 years old, and you have only been composing for a year and a half. Give yourself some time writing smaller things before trying this. You’ll know when you’re ready to move on to bigger things. However, since nothing I say is likely to stop you if you have your mind set on trying to build Hoover Dam with a box of Lego, as it were, @aMusicComposer has given you some wisdom about not expecting too much from your first effort (with which I concur), as well as some good advice about studying a book on orchestration – and Rimsky-Korsakov’s is a great one for what you seem to be envisioning. As for planning in advance, it appears you already know something of what you want to do as far as basic things like key, metre, tempo, and instrumentation go. Now all you need are some ideas, and no one can teach you how to come up with those. Good luck to you, and keep us informed of your progress!
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