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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/03/2019 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    My Piano Sonata No.1 in F Minor composed in 2018. The sonata has 3 movements and is written in a romantic style. The first movement is in rondo form. The second consists of a prelude and a short fugue, and the final movement is more free in its form. The sonata is inspired by some of the works of Chopin and Beethoven. I'd be interested in any feedback. Sorry about the awful recording quality.
  2. 5 points
    The suite's finally up! A lot of movements have been posted here already, but it is a different experience all the way through (if I do say so myself 🙂). Movements 3 and 5 have not been uploaded here before if you want to skip to those, though. Enjoy!
  3. 5 points
    Hi all, I've not posted anything here for quite a while, been busy with other things, but I've also been working to finish my first fully orchestrated piano concerto. The first movement was posted here about a year ago, but the second and third movements are new. The first movement has also been edited and hopefully improved as I added a short cadenza that I felt was missing from the first movement, as well as changing the odd passage here and there. Anyway, I'm pretty pleased with the final edit. As always, any comments are welcome and gratefully received.
  4. 4 points
    The second movement of my piano suite. It'll be released as a full piece in about a week or so, but this is my second favorite movement in and of itself! I know it's based off of some prime form I was working off of, but I don't remember what it is now 😅
  5. 4 points
    I'm a doctor for what's its worth. Please everyone, relax. Certainly, there is concern particularly for the high risk elderly and those with complex medical issues but for the vast majority of people, this is really similar to a bad flu which is also high risk in elderly and patients with complicated medical issues (yet people still don't vaccinate for this......). Take the usual precautions by good handwashing/hygeine, avoid large crowds when possible, and look after your loved ones who are higher risk. The hysteria can be worse than the disease itself.
  6. 4 points
    Here is a little impromptu I wrote a few weeks ago. What do you think ?
  7. 4 points
    I see. Then you obviously do not require our feedback here. Good luck
  8. 4 points
    "Marcia Funebre" for Piano Here a little funeral march that proably I will generate a more developed pice from it: Marcia Funebre (3).mp3 Marcia Funebre.pdf Open for suggestion and feedback! ADVICE! The dynimic notation is still not finished.
  9. 4 points
    I don't know how much music history you've studied up to this point, but this whole notion of material-based originality came from the genesis of the Romantic era, where the advancement of middle-class music making along with the general advancement of music printing/publishing combined. Composers started using super fancy/exotic-sounding titles and used increased harmonic changes to be more expressive and have their pick at the newly free market. I'll elaborate on my own opinions/answer more of the proposed questions if this discussion gets more lively, but I'm more a fan of the way the Classical era dealt with originality, where quality was based upon how well you could use old forms and conventions in your own style/ways. It doesn't sound very modern to us because it was their styles, but Haydn's and Beethoven's music were pretty novel when they were written. The modern era has taken this Romantic ideal of expression and newness to its extreme, trying to push progress without having the patience for it. The elitism and high-artness of modern classical music generally glosses over the music most people will listen to; how subtle its changes are to formulas, but how effectively catchy the songs are. Maybe my thoughts on this will change over time.
  10. 4 points
    Some short pieces. Six Piano Pieces.pdf 01 Aeolian (Winds).mp3 02 The Hummingbird's Phrygian Flight.mp3 03 Quick Diminished Changes.mp3 04 Can We Be Friends.mp3 05 Longing Worlds.mp3 06 Gemini II.mp3
  11. 3 points
    ***** Anyway I've already commented on this person's efforts several times with no acknowledgement or thanks when I really should be putting time in on a project even if stalled by this latest virus thing) so I won't be commenting again. . ***** @Quinn, I get maybe four acknowledgments out of ten comments I leave. It's a problem around here, and it's just bad form.
  12. 3 points
    A prelude I have composed yesterday. I hope you like it!
  13. 3 points
    A little jazz piece... Hope you like it. (Trumpet in concert pitch).
  14. 3 points
    Fanfare for My Brother Score.pdf In a passing conversation, Dr. Thurman had told me about how he was selecting repertoire for orchestra brass literature that included euphonium. This topic has always been a “thorn in the side” for euphoniumists worldwide especially for me as a compsoer. Although I knew they would probably never be played, I would write orchestra music with euphonium in college hoping one day the orchestra world would fall in love with instrument. Reflecting on that “pain”, I told Dr. Thurman I was going to rework a piece specifically just for him to conduct and called his own. I reached in my vault and throughly revised a piece originally called “Water to Wine” to “Fanfare for My Brother” to show my gratitude to someone who truly is my “Brother from another mother.” Here's from a read-through recorded on the phone.
  15. 3 points
    Concerto per violino, archi e bass continuo in b minor "Paradiso e inferno". written 20.06.19 - 25.06.19. Been some time since i wrote a concerto, so here is my summer contribution. Three part concerto written in the late italian school. I. Allegro - paradiso: 4/4 time, livly tempo and fugures, high in the register of the violin (Heaven it is!), the triumph key of d major. II. Adagio - cadere dalla grazia (fall from grace) 4/4 time. slow pace, rethorical use of rets, b, minor III. Vivace - inferno, 4/4 time, fast pace, slaming fugres, chromatic downward passages (going down to hell), b minor Please tell me what you think SimenN
  16. 3 points
    I think the best word to describe my music is "neo-romantic." I write music that I feel is easy and pleasing to listen to - not necessarily 'light music' but not avant-garde. My style is not so similar to Romantic composers as to be reminiscent of any one, rather in a review I received here I was told that: "One minute I'm hearing Mendelssohn's influence, the next a little Tchaikovsky." I believe it was @J. Lee Graham who said that, a composer who is obviously also a traditional tonalist. My biggest works are largely Romantic. There are some minor 20th century inflections that I add, such as an unusual modulation or chord choice. I also like to utilise new instruments such as the Contraforte, or ones which slipped into obscurity during the Romantic period such as the alto trombone. NB: The alto trombone is a wonderful addition to the orchestral brass section. Listen to many orchestral pieces from the Classical era, including Beethoven's symphonies to hear it in action. In chamber works however, there is a larger scope of influence, especially from the music of Scotland, where I live. Classical pieces that I have written include sections with common Scottish musical ideas, and a string sextet that I am writing has the finale as a harmonised Strathspey dance. In the age of the internet and globalisation, we have a huge range of musical influences from throughout the world. Ethnomusicology is a growing area of study, and we composers have the freedom to write whatever we want, whether from orchestras with oboes and strings, or for ensembles with sitar, gamelan and electronics. What we should never forget is the universal language of music. Atonality has become common and respected, and this poses the risk of us tonalists being forgotten or actively disregarded. The worst thing that I could hear is not an experimentalist piece by Stockhausen. It's not a calculated serialist sonata. It's just four words: "Find your own voice." Who has the right to dictate anyone's compositional style?
  17. 3 points
    Just a little sad flute solo.
  18. 3 points
    I have written this as part of the Christmas music project. It's a revision of a carol I wrote a couple of years ago (which can be found here) based on Shakespeare's "Song of the Holly." It is for SATB choir and an accompaniment.
  19. 3 points
    As the title implies, it truly is silent
  20. 3 points
    Hello guys, I am totally new here and I am really impressed by discovering such an active forum with so many talents! I am really surprised, didn't know there was such a place on the web! Anyway, I am a youngish composer (31yo), I started composing around 2 years a go (but play the piano since many years). I have composed a good amount of stuff but my favourite is probably Math Piano Rock. This is inspired by Math Rock, a fast paced genre with frequent change of rythm and no lyrics (I hate lyrics!), but also Prokofiev and Bartok. The piece is *difficult*! The video below is performed by a software - but I have actually played it live a couple of times (you can see in my channel some videos where I do that, if you are interested). I am always looking to opinion, suggestions and ideas!
  21. 3 points
    Hi Everyone, I just recently finished my first "exact" composition for solo piano . Prior to this, I have been improvising and composing various themes for many years but this is the first time I went about trying to put together a coherent piece and notating it. I would love to hear what people think about it. Here's a link to my own performance ( with score) on youtube: Also, here's a link to the score (also attached as pdf) : https://musescore.com/user/25828516/scores/5759589/s/0aktCw I realize that some of the more difficult sections aren't a 100% clean in my performance. So those interested, could listen to a "100% accurate" but somewhat stiff/mechanical software (musescore) playback to evaluate those sections. ( I did my best to put hidden instructions in the software so it sounds less robotic ). I'm completely self-taught in music theory/composition and am trying to evaluate where I stand currently as far as my compositional skills are concerned. So, any kind of feedback would be highly appreciated. Also, here's a short description of the piece: The title of this piece alludes to the tendancy of this piece to drift from one style to another, from music of one period to another, from one mood to another. The music also tends to "drift" from a standard waltz form to music which has little resemblance to a waltz ( but may still maintain a slight waltz pulse) . Thank you very much !!
  22. 3 points
    Ray Bradbury once said, "Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity." And Albert Einstein said something similar: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." The vast majority of your posts on this forum display your detailed—and oftentimes dizzying—thought processes. But all of this planning is honoring the "servant" and ignoring the "gift." For the most part, the works you produce sound rigid, analytical, and unfeeling—which I don't think truly reflects who you are—because you can't plan out creativity. It is 100% informed by our intuitive mind, not our rational mind. You have a vast understanding of music theory: your rational mind at work. If you want to become a better composer, I advise you to start using your intuitive mind. In other words, stop thinking and start creating. I apologize for being so blunt, but I do understand where you're coming from. It's very difficult not to research every aspect of something before sitting down to do it. It makes us feel competent (or, rather, it keeps us from feeling incompetent). If we can totally understand something it has no chance of overwhelming us, or so we tell ourselves. As comforting as that may seem, it only hinders us in the creative process. Trust me. I do agree with @Luis Hernández, @aMusicComposer and @Markus Boyd. You pepper the forum with requests for advice but only respond to either defend yourself or if someone you view as competent provides feedback. I truly don't believe your intention is to put all of us off like that. Please try to put yourself in our shoes; we are only trying to help you.
  23. 3 points
    Wrote this last night, I'm kind of excited about it. Anxious to hear what you guys think.
  24. 3 points
    Jesus, man, how much are you paying for this?
  25. 3 points
    Composition completed on 10/28/2015 You also can watch this piece here -
  26. 3 points
    This was written in November 19, 2012. I was quite prolific and experimental in writing music during 2012-2014, and while I was just playing around with melodies along the higher register, I decided to write this one out. While this one's a very short piece, it was among the very few ones that were actually completed, so I wanna share it to the forum. Hope you like it 🙂
  27. 3 points
    The difficulty is that when trying to be original, you have no control over what your contemporaries are doing. Ideas don't appear out of a vacuum. We are all the products of our cumulative experiences. So it's very likely that the same influences that nudge you towards writing a certain kind of music are acting on other composers in the same way. There are a LOT of people on the planet at this point in history, and it ends up being a numbers game. And today we live in a globally connected world. We don't have the comfort of long periods of musical isolation from the neighboring cathedral towns or royal courts while we gather our thoughts and develop our ideas. If you're working on it, someone else is going to hear about it. If someone else is working on it, it's hard to stop their ideas from leaking into your inner soundscape. We also have no control over what happens after us. Trying to strategize the best direction for your music now, in the context of music history two hundred years from now, is a pretty impossible task. If you've got the foresight to solve that one, can you please stop pursuing composing and sort out world peace instead? What seems original now may completely miss the boat for what ends up being significant. I say, just write what you like. One of the best predictors of being important to the direction of music in your time is to write enough music to get good, and to get good enough to be performed, filed away in music libraries, and passed around to other musicians so you can influence other people. If you hate what you are writing, you won't be able to stick around long enough to get good. You'll quit before you get started. So compose music that you find moving, don't quit to spend your free time watching TV, and if you are very lucky, you may stumble on something original enough to move the gears of progress a notch.
  28. 3 points
    This is a great discussion point - and one that I think the world of composition needs. There is no secret that I am a tonal composer. It's just the music I enjoy writing and listening to. As a composer, whichever combination of tones you use will create something that is unique to you, whether is be 5, 7, 8, or 12. Provided you are not copying a piece directly, then it is original enough. The biggest problem comes from exposure. Why would a (paying) audience go to see a symphony by an unknown composer which sounded Classical, rather than their favourite Mozart one. Here lies the problem with originality - performances. Bottom line, if you want to write tonally, do it. It's still original. However atonal music is more likely to be performed, which brings me to the next point. I, as a composer, want to write music that I enjoy. If someone tells you what style of music you should write, then that will ruin the enjoyment of music for you. This is the problem with conservatoires, who tend to only accept people with an avant-garde style which they consider to be more original. Not to attack John Cage, but silence? Seriously!? Disclaimer: I mean no disrespect to atonal/avant-garde composers. You are all equally skilled and creative. I just personally don't like the style. If even one other person besides me listens to my music and enjoys it, then I feel like I have succeeded in a way. I would like to get my music performed but composition isn't my main pursuit in music so I don't mind as much. New music ensembles tend to only want to perform avant-garde pieces, and traditional orchestras generally do not accept pieces from budding composers. As a composer, I want to reach out to other musicians and show them what I have worked on. You could say I am trying to "revolutionise music" because I want to show the world that tonal composers still flourish, even though they are looked down on by competitions and festivals. I thought about this a few months ago. I love the works of the greats from the last few centuries. It appeals strongly to me, because my ear - as most ears do - perceives it as right. Tonal music is designed to be pleasant - but that doesn't mean it is limited to what most non musicians think classical music is. Take two birds sitting on a branch. One sings tonally, the other races rats over a finish line and sings the notes in the order that they place. Which one will get a mate? The ear - our ear, an ant's ear, a bird's ear - likes the harmonic relationship between the frequencies of a tonal scale. My style, as I have said before, is tonal, but I like to experiment with the changing harmonies caused by a chromatic movement. Listen to this simply beautiful piece by Grieg. I didn't play it for a while, because from looking at the score I could see it had a lot of chromaticism. But it is still tonal, and this is what I try to write. I don't count myself as a pastiche of Grieg, because I draw my style from another source. Scotland has a rich traditional music heritage, and if you listen carefully to some of my most recent music (not posted here yet) you can hear the influences from playing fiddle in a school folk band. I even write specific Scottish traditional pieces to play in the group, although that is not the main part of my output. My style? Tonal×Accidentals×Scottish Music Music is so subjective. Thanks for sticking with me, it's my longest post ever.
  29. 3 points
    Hi all! I'm new here, and I really wish I'd discovered this community much sooner! I love classical music but, as a violist, my largest complaint has been the lack of stirring, cinematic viola concerti. Well, what's a composer to do? So here's my stab at a full-length viola concerto. I've named it Yfirsést (pronounced ih-ver-syest), the Icelandic word for "overlooked," and an all-too common feeling among violists. This is the first movement, and it resounds with the struggle of overcoming mediocrity and being seen for what you are. (I couldn't tell you what composer it sounds like, because to me, it sounds like me. 🙂) I appreciate your feedback, and especially taking the time to listen! I'll upload the second and third movements (along with the scores for all 3) later.
  30. 3 points
    I've got one more sonata to share here. This is a 2015 composition. It was performed as part of my trio performance in 2018, but we didn't get around to making a house recording of it, so the performance will have to do in spite of some shortcomings in both the performance and recording. Remembering that the balance was piano-heavy in the violin sonata I had played in the same venue some years earlier, I placed the recorder quite close to the cello this time. Too close, as it turns out. One of these times I'll get it right; this seems to be a difficult venue to record in, despite the excellent live acoustics. For those expecting some modern elements in my writing, you'll note that there are a number of aleatoric elements, including but not limited to baby cries, pages shuffling, various weird noises, an early entry, and some wrong notes (all completely intentional, of course). The piece itself is in three movements. The first is a rather slow, brooding sonata-allegro. The second is an ABABA rondoish form with alternating slow and quick segments, and the final movement is also best described as a rondo, though it doesn't cleanly match the standard 5-part or 7-part form of Classical period works. It's one of my darker works and likely not as appealing as other things I've written, but I've finally decided I like it enough to share it here.
  31. 2 points
    Here the first 47 bars of the first movement of my first symphony! Allegro.mp3 Open for feedback and suggestions!
  32. 2 points
    It's a planet earth-y style orchestral piece. I've got my own theories, but fresh ears are always a huge plus! Don't hold back:
  33. 2 points
    A new symphony! I completely understand if you do not have the time to listen to some random person's full length symphony. Therefore, I appreciate feedback of any sort, even if for just one movement. However, as the composer I do not recommend you listen to the finale before the rest of the symphony, as much of the finale's musical direction is drawn from the rest of the symphony. I have provided a full analysis of the work in the score provided. Please give as much criticism as you can (and try to reference measures in the work to give weight to your points, and so I can also see what you mean). As always, thank you very much for your time and I look forward to this becoming a better symphony! The recordings (made by Musescore): Mvt 1: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CAOxhNLxX5mTM8I3pN6a00cJ6LObPzIA/view?usp=sharing Mvt 2: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vgF-fNAFtjASFNw4Ni65gIQQnYiyP7M1/view?usp=sharing Mvt 3: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1pil7DL1e0xil9X8P3a89r-0qjQ3nFiC8/view?usp=sharing Mvt 4: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HgNhClxXphbyeCLpMbsNBtL58nDL1eGF/view?usp=sharing
  34. 2 points
    Here’s another one with heavy Beatles influence. I’m interested to know how the balance is and if the bass is too loud. Thanks for listening.
  35. 2 points
    To be able to critically validate your own work is probably one of the most important (and difficult) things for a composer to learn. And in this context, it is important to be able to validate and learn from negative comments. A lot of people seem to be only looking for praise, which is a kind of self-deception. A good rule is: Take your work seriously but don´t take yourself seriously.
  36. 2 points
  37. 2 points
    Hello everybody! This is my latest piece, which was inspired by composers such as Arvo Pärt, Francis Poulenc and Samuel Barber. It was also a study into the use of artificial harmonics and textures. It's also important to note that the harmonics won't sound that clear in real life. However, I structured the piece so that the first parts of the music won't require clarity of the individual lines. The last third of the piece has almost no harmonics so that It becomes more "meaty". Anyways, I hope you all enjoy it, and as always, feedback is greatly appreciated!
  38. 2 points
    When I did a cleanup of my old files, I found the beginning (first 15 bars) of a waltz. My intention (back in 2010) was to write a piece as homage to Chopin on occasion of the celebration of his birthday in 1810. However, I abandoned it, because I had too many other ongoing projects. Instead of deleting it, I now finished it last week. I have to say that it was really a useful experience to write something in a Chopin-like style. The first phrases and their repetitions later on in the piece are of course very, very much Chopin, but there is also a lot, which is different. I would be curious to know what you think of it (thanks in advance for your feedback).
  39. 2 points
    Hello, everyone. It's been a while since I last posted anything, and I finally have a new piece for you all to listen to: the Fantasia in F-sharp minor. I consider this piece to be my most ambitious work for piano, and also my most personal work. It is also my now-longest composition, lasting roughly 32 minutes in length. The Fantasia is in 3 movements: Movement 1. - Ballade: Moderato serioso (F-sharp minor) Movement 2. - Barcarolle: Andante (F-sharp major) Movement 3. - Finale - Tempest: Moderato - Allegro appassionato - Maestoso (F-sharp minor-major) Here are my performances of the movements on Youtube: I hope you all enjoy. 🙂 Theo
  40. 2 points
    Hello Markus! I thought I am going to give you a review too, and well, I can't.. I think it's very clear which of us can teach way more about baroque style to the other, so all I could do at the moment is to Like this and to say: Hats off, Sir! 🙂 (PS. I'm going to remember you if I stuck with a baroque composition)
  41. 2 points
    Hi guys, I just found this forum and signed up straight ahead. And so this is my first post here. Something about my composition. Like the title says, it is my first composition I did with Studio One. Also this is one out of 3 total composition, I used to apply to some music universities, to show, how far my skills are. But I also wanted you guys to evaluate it and maybe give me some tipps. Hope you like it :)
  42. 2 points
    This guy's great. He sounds like a discount politician. I'm really excited that he has recognized my inherent talent and POTENTIAL to help him out! I mean, this guy's nothing short of a goddamn visionary! He also knows we are GREAT! And above all else? He's appreciative too! Man, what more could you possibly want!!??
  43. 2 points
    It's a very attractive concerto, Mark. I found it by way of Theodore Servin, an extremely talented composer who is also a member here. I think your piano concerto has a lot in common with the Piano Concerto No 1 of Nobert Burgmüller both in mood and technique. Burgmüller was writing in the very early days of the 19th century and I think you concerto reflects this early Romantic style. Solid orchestration and balance of groups of instruments are evident. Well done.
  44. 2 points
  45. 2 points
    This song is the first in a five-movement suite inspired by my time in Iceland. The opening theme uses counterpoint and sustained notes to emulate that feeling of joy-anxiety each new day brings. There is a transitional passage that builds with anticipation into the middle theme, which is harmonically less complex than the first—this is meant to represent that feeling of unbridled peace an early morning stroll in nature brings. The middle theme is repeated in various keys and modulations before the return to the opening theme and the piece ends in a soft, arppegiated finish. Mornings anywhere are special times, but I find them particularly breathtaking in Iceland. There are so few people and so many natural phenomena that one can't help but be spiritually touched by íslensk dögun—an Icelandic dawn. (Be warned: sunrises/sunsets are difficult to catch in high summer and winter, as the sun never really rises/sets.) I couldn't resist incorporating a morning song into a suite about that lovely country! The overall style of the song is impressionistic... you likely won't come away humming any melodies, but (hopefully) you will come away with those feelings etched on your soul for a while. BTW I'm a pianist and, as such, strive to make my piano songs as enjoyable to play as possible. You'll notice quite a bit of hand-crossing, melody-driven left-hand passages, and many other "fun" effects. I think that's enough words for now. Please, enjoy and comment! I always love hearing how the piece made you feel, and what did or didn't sit well with you!
  46. 2 points
    Very nice and enjoyable piece. I see you have a detailed and realistic (but difficult sometimes) writing for the piano and I like it. The overall feeling is very rhythmic, almost in an ostinato, so the counterpoint parts (teh beginning) are a good contrast. However, it doesn't sound impressionistic to me. It's tonal and harmony doesn't leave the audience any doubt (which is the essence of impressionism). I think it moves between classic and romantic language. But it's quite original, and that's what counts. (I'd love to see the mornings you describe in Iceland....)
  47. 2 points
    This is a good topic for discussion; thanks for bringing it up! I think each of us creates "original" music in the sense that we as composers create works of music that are uniquely our own. True, they may resemble certain styles and forms of other composers—I'm not sure one can ever escape that since all of our musical ideas are built upon stuff we've heard before and internalized. As we become more experienced, we're able to remove ourselves farther away from those influences, so our music slowly takes on its own voice. As to the "style" of originality as defined by the classical music elites, I'm stumped there. The style of music heralded by the elites as "purely original" is, as you mentioned, atonal. Proponents of atonal music posit that it's a musical era just like Romantic or Impressionism, but I disagree; up until the Modern/Postmodern era of classical music, composers followed the natural "rules" of music. Debussy (an Impressionist for those following along at home) did some weird things with tonality but he obeyed the rules. The human ear is wired to interpret certain pitch relationships as consonant and others as dissonant—and these days, some as purely chaotic. Modern/postmodern classical music, with its strong atonality, is the first musical movement to actually rebel against this natural rule, or at least disregard it, in the hopes of staying original. So, all this to say that modern composers have abandoned tonality because they believe there's nothing "original" left to be had there. Again, I disagree. It takes a lot more work and creative thinking to find an original voice in the world of tonality, but it's entirely possible—and very satisfying! I've a hunch that the great composers of our generation remembered 100 years down the road will not be the progressive, 12-tone serialists churning out mind-boggling, gut-wrenching cacophonies; rather, it will be those who continued to tinker with tonality and made music that meshed with the human soul. My goals are rather simple: write music that I like. I'd much prefer to revolutionize music than reach a big audience, but (for reasons mentioned above) I don't feel like that's going in the direction of the current avant-garde styles. There's still hundreds of years' worth of exploring to do in the world of tonality! So how original do we need to be? Well, be as original as you want to be! Some people create amazing works that sound like Beethoven or Mozart could have written. Others' sound like something from an outfit from Mars. The problem I find is that composers are either cliché tonal composers (little musical training) or else they're atonal. This probably has to do with the fact that atonal music is the prima donna right now among the elites; atonal music will receive the most praise (and it's difficult to criticize since it doesn't follow a lot of rules), so "serious" composers seek originality via that route. If there are atonal composers reading this, please don't get the wrong impression! I respect your compositional styles 100%; my point is that atonal music is not the sole arbiter of originality. As you might have guessed, my music is strongly tonal. However, I use a rich combination of chords throughout so it doesn't sound too cliché. In fact, I hate having to use conventional chord progressions; I strive to avoid them when I can. My works have a strong thematic element to them but are rarely melody-driven (in other words, not like Tchaikovsky and other Romantics). I also use a lot of unconventional modulations that loosely tie to the previous key. And I love counterpoint—I always try to use it when I can. It helps ensure that all players have "interesting" parts to play! I guess I'm describing Impressionism, and maybe that category best fits my musical style. Anyone is welcome to take a listen to some of my stuff and give their own opinion. 🙂
  48. 2 points
    A maximum-cheese, power metal tune I composed as a battle theme for an indie game. Let me know what you think.
  49. 2 points
    Emanuel, please do not promote your track in my post!
  50. 2 points
    So a year ago, I had this idea of composing a suite that would represent different types of weather. I would call this suite Weather Music. But it wasn't until a few days ago that I actually started composing part of the suite. What part did I start composing you might ask? Well, I started composing probably the most intense part of the suite. That's right, I composed the part of the suite that is supposed to represent a storm. I am like exactly a quarter of the way through finishing the piece. But before I even started composing it, I was like: Full orchestra example: Beethoven here is really getting across the feel of a thunderstorm and the calm after the storm with the orchestra here. String orchestra example: Probably the most well known example of a storm represented in music. So well known, that it itself is often called Storm when played without the preceding 2 movements of Summer. There is no calm ending to the music at all. Piano example: Not directly a piece representing a storm unlike the previous 2 but it could very well be interpreted as stormy music because of the tempo and all the octaves. So I had a lot of pieces to go on as to how to get the feeling of a storm across. The only real questions were what key to have the piece in and what to compose the piece for. I eventually decided on piano solo because that is my area of expertise. I mean I am a very advanced pianist and I started composing in my intermediate years, mainly piano works. So it makes sense that composing for piano would be a natural thing for me because I know my abilities and limitations as a pianist. I don't directly know those same things for flute, violin, or any other instrument the way that I do for piano. The only way I know these things for other instruments is by studying the instruments and pieces written for those instruments. This is how come I know that out of all the possible piano-not piano duets that exist, the most balanced is the cello-piano duet. This is how come I know that a forte dynamic in the first octave is impossible on the flute. It has to do with pieces that I have listened to that are written for those instruments and other ways that I study the instruments. But no matter how good I get at say writing for flute, my piano composition skill is likely to always be superior because I get that skill directly from my knowledge of music notation, music theory, and 10 years of experience playing the piano, no studying piano pieces out of context of playing them required at all. Plus I have several other non-piano works that I am working on(namely my first symphony which might take me a year just to get the piano draft of it finished but that's okay) Anyway, back to my storm piece. That was quite the digression there but I just felt like I had to get it out. I decided to have it in the key of C minor because it is very easy for me to improvise in the key of C minor and simultaneously get it to sound very expressive. It is almost impossible for me to do that same thing for C major(which is partly why I mostly avoid composing in C major). And stormy is 1 feeling that is very natural to the key of C minor. In fact, just about any emotion that you can get out of a key is a natural emotion in C minor under certain conditions. Even happiness is a natural emotion for C minor. How I'm getting across the feeling of a storm So 1 thing that I noticed in common in nearly all pieces of music that I would consider to have a stormy character was octaves. But not just any old octaves. No, the octaves I noticed in stormy music were very fast and they were alternating. Very commonly, I would notice that almost the entire bass line is in octaves(as is the case with the Beethoven examples) or otherwise as in the Vivaldi example, the repeated notes in the bass would get across the same feel as octaves would and the octaves only really exist if you combine the bass and alto lines. So naturally, I took these octaves and applied them to the left hand part of my piece and the only time these octaves would be slow was in chords. Even when I state the Fate Motif, it isn't slow, despite being a rhythmic augmentation of the original motif just because of the fast tempo. I so far have done all these things to get across the feel of a storm: Keep up the momentum of the 16th notes except in certain spots to make the entire piece sound dramatic Use a minor key because the same drama would be hard to get across in a major key, even taking everything else into consideration Use scalar passages with unpredictable leaps to represent the strong wind by giving a chaotic feel to what would otherwise be a normal scale. Use diminished 7ths more often than dominant 7ths just to add more drama Use the Fate Motif as a bass line during some of the scalar passages to represent the lightning flash. Use chord progressions to represent the thunder that comes after the lightning(this is what I mean when I say that the octaves are slow in chords) Have the melody in the right hand outside of scalar passages be staccato to represent the rainfall Under the staccato melody, use fast octaves to give a sense of turbulence, which is very fitting for a storm Use stark dynamic contrast between passages representing thunder and lightning and passages representing rain Creschendo to a loud dynamic Suddenly get quieter Presto tempo(mine is actually on the slow end of Presto, at 160 BPM) Here is the piece as it is so far. Sound ends at about 1:25 in the MP3 just so you know. Does it sound stormy to you with all the octaves, 16th notes, and the Presto tempo?
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