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I think you're talking about flats and sharps.

Judging by your question, I also assume you're fairly new to music.

Sharp (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Flat (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

These two are known as accidentals: find all about accidentals at:

Accidental (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Far more detailed article.

I hope this helps.

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Yes, I can confirm that both Kamen and Daniel are correct. In Swedish the terminology for Dur is in English equivalent to major and moll the equivalent for minor.

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There is one more thing that is probably worth mentioning (although little offtopic):

While in USA, UK, probably Ireland and Scotland, Cmaj and Cmin (for example) are parallel tonalities, in Russia, Bulgaria (my country), Germany and some other countries, parallel tonalities are Cmaj and Amin. It's just a difference in terminology, which could be confusing sometimes. Also, B and Bb are labelled as H and B. I personally stick to what is used in USA and UK.

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Last I heard, here in the US, a major key that has the same key signature of a minor key is called relative. (A minor is the relative minor of C major) Parallel keys have the same tonic. (C major is the parallel major to C minor)

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Moll and dur are the German (maybe other?) names for minor and major respectively (in music.) They come from the words for "soft" and "hard" which show up historically as a square flat sign which looks a bit like an "h" and a rounded flat sign which looks a bit like a "b." Thus the German use of H and B for what the English call B and Bb.

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everyone's right, but.. moll-dur/dur-moll can be a chord, basically the altering of one note in a scale to change a chord from minor to major or the other way around..

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On 1/25/2008 at 1:55 PM, joeharmony said:

Could someone explain Moll-dur to me in simple language, including it's english name.

Thanks :toothygrin:

 

I don’t know if you will read this it’s about 10 years later. 

Moll dur is a musical scale different than major or minor. 

The easiest way to understand is when you take one major scale like C major for example. The moll dur from C major will be: 

C D E F G Ab BC

step No VI(6) is A flat. 

You can make any major scale into moll dur (I still don’t know  the correct English name) with using a flat on the sixth step.  

It could be major-minor tonality but that is from one forum I’ve read somewhere. Again not sure about the correct name. 

Hope this helps. 

Elena

Edited by Elena

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