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Hello everybody,

Here is a piece that I have just picked up again. This Piano Concerto is meant to study the classical and early romantic piano concerti. I arrived at the development section, but I feel like this movement is going on forever and it bores me.
Does it bore you too? If so, do you have any advice how to improve the action?

The development section is pretty abstract for me in piano concerti. Do you have some suggestions that I can make in the development section?
What do you think about the piece so far?

I look forward to your response!

Maarten

Piano Concerto No.1 ''Octaves''.mp3

Piano Concerto No.1 ''Octaves''.pdf

PDF

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Good job overall. Your general use of harmony is good, though a small number of awkward spots can be found in the intro, which is too long. I think the piano part could be more molodic. You can also cut out repetitions of certain figures. You can continue the piece, perhaps with another piano melody.

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4 hours ago, ilv said:

Good job overall. Your general use of harmony is good, though a small number of awkward spots can be found in the intro, which is too long. I think the piano part could be more molodic. You can also cut out repetitions of certain figures. You can continue the piece, perhaps with another piano melody.

 

Thank you!

Could you tell me where I can fin these awkward spots and how to fix them?

To be honest, I find the intro pretty nice, because it is an interation of sixteenths between the viola and de cellos + basses.

Which figures do you think I have to cut out?

Maybe I could add an extra theme in the development section?

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The first thing I would avoid would be to make the intro different than the rest of the concerto.
0:37: Ab and G in the bass line do not fit with the upper voices. Bb and C would fix the problem
0:39: The high E should be followed by an F for a proper resolution
0:40: Ab in the bass and G in the treble do not go well together. Same for 0:41, except there's a Bb in the treble.
0:43: Bb in F minor chord. Awkward. Ab should fix it.
1:25:dn 1:26: V34 of D major does not resolve well into an F minor tonic chord. This can be fixed by changing the A to Bb.

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You know what? Harmonically it sounds classic.

But in other aspects it sounds modern. The piano doesn't have a prominent (solo and virtuoso) part. It rather mixes with the strings in syncopation for example in m. 86 onwards.

Although it's just the beginning, it seems more a concert for strings with piano. I like the textures you get.

By the way, although I know all those rules and facts, I CAN'T write in this style (I don't want to, either)...

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Agree with Luis on the piano blending in with the other parts. Do you want the piano to have a sympathetic or soloistic role?

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12 minutes ago, Luis Hernández said:

You know what? Harmonically it sounds classic.

But in other aspects it sounds modern. The piano doesn't have a prominent (solo and virtuoso) part. It rather mixes with the strings in syncopation for example in m. 86 onwards.

Although it's just the beginning, it seems more a concert for strings with piano. I like the textures you get.

By the way, although I know all those rules and facts, I CAN'T write in this style (I don't want to, either)...

 

 

6 minutes ago, ilv said:

Agree with Luis on the piano blending in with the other parts. Do you want the piano to have a sympathetic or soloistic role?

 

There are different kinds of solo concerts. The first is what I call 'virtuosic concerto'. This means that the orchestra has rather a accompanying role, whereas the piano has the virtuosic role and all lights are turned on the pianist. 

The second type is the 'conversation concerto'. This means that the orchestra and piano support each other and they both have melodic and accompanying roles.

The latter is the one I chose to use for my concerto, because I am no pianist and I do not feel like I can write virtuosic parts that still work well.

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2 minutes ago, Maarten Bauer said:

 

There are different kinds of solo concerts. The first is what I call 'virtuosic concerto'. This means that the orchestra has rather a accompanying role, whereas the piano has the virtuosic role and all lights are turned on the pianist. 

The second type is the 'conversation concerto'. This means that the orchestra and piano support each other and they both have melodic and accompanying roles.

The latter is the one I chose to use for my concerto, because I am no pianist and I do not feel like I can write virtuosic parts that still work well.

 

Yes, that's what I meant.

That kind of concerto is more "modern". The tonal language you use is associated more with the virtuoso concerto. Of course any combination is possible.

A great concerto in which an "old" sound is taken (harpsichord) but written absolutely in an impressionistic language is the Concerto for Harpsichord and Five Instruments by Manuel de Falla. You can check it on youtube.

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9 minutes ago, Luis Hernández said:

Yes, that's what I meant.

That kind of concerto is more "modern". The tonal language you use is associated more with the virtuoso concerto. Of course any combination is possible.

A great concerto in which an "old" sound is taken (harpsichord) but written absolutely in an impressionistic language is the Concerto for Harpsichord and Five Instruments by Manuel de Falla. You can check it on youtube.

 

Thank you! I will look at it!

I want to combine the classical music before 1900 with the music after 1900. Maybe one can say that I am a sort of neo-classical composer?

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Of course. Stravinsky was one of the Neo-classical composers (part of his work).

In other field, Richard Strauss, after playing with atonality in Salomé and Elektra, wrote neoclassical (Mozartian) operas: Der Rosenkavalier, Capriccio...

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37 minutes ago, Josep Montserrat said:

Very interesting work!  conratulations for your good taste!

 

Thanks!

Stay tuned for the whole piece. At this moment, I finished the first half of the development section.

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