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J.Santos

Sonatina in C major

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I bring you the Sonatina I'm preparing to make an ode to Mozart. He died 5th-6th of december.

At the moment I only have the first movement, and is not very worked since I only worked on it an afternoon, but here it is:

 

 

Edited by J.Santos
Added second movement
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As an organist, I don't know much about Mozart and I seriously lack of classical-classical experiences (I mean for ex. not classical-baroque, and not classical-romantic, but classical-classical), but from the Mozart pieces I've heard through my life, your piece has some really Mozart-y sounding parts for sure.

Particularly my favorite parts are which I think they sound the most Mozart-y,
around 0:03 "Di - Re" ("C# - D" in your piece's key), and around 0:09 the "Ri - Mi" ("D# - E" in your piece).
I think this type of half-step (most of the time from bottom to the top(?) I mean stepping up a half-step we could call it one of Mozart's signature pitch-writing.

As a mini-tip: I think you can do this half-step-up-melody-trick on almost any note, except "Li - Ti" ("A# - B" in C major key), because "A#" or "Bb" however we call it at the place of the context in C major key most likely it would sound like the "Fa" note of F major key, it would sound like the "Tay" note of C dominant chord, and "Fa usually want's to go a half-step down, instead of down, at least in the case of a C dominant 7 chord, if you would play for ex. a C dominant 7 chord and then a G or a G dominant 7 chord to force the A# go half step up to B, then I think it would not sound right in a classical-classical context, it would sound almost like a certain part of a blues chord progression especially if we would chose to use only dominant 7 chords.
Probably I wrote this explanation unneseseraliy complicated and too long, sorry about that 🙂 It's not that important,
but in an easier way I could say that my tip is that I think you can do these half-step-Mozart-y-pitch-writing:
C# - D
D# - E
E -F
(probably even F - F#)
F# -G
G# - A
(but CAN'T do A# - B)
B - C too I guess

I can't explain well why I think this, this is just my intuition, probably I'm wrong somewhere, others might tell us where.

Another little thing is that I think the Alberti-bass was a good choice to start with, I think Mozart liked to use it a lot!

As I wrote earlier I don't know much about Mozart, but these are the things that I've noticed immediately even by not knowing Mozart too much so you made even me recognize the essence of Mozart in your piece, so I think you are on the right track!

Edited by Lotsy piano
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2 hours ago, Lotsy piano said:

As an organist, I don't know much about Mozart and I seriously lack of classical-classical experiences (I mean for ex. not classical-baroque, and not classical-romantic, but classical-classical), but from the Mozart pieces I've heard through my life, your piece has some really Mozart-y sounding parts for sure.

Particularly my favorite parts are which I think they sound the most Mozart-y,
around 0:03 "Di - Re" ("C# - D" in your piece's key), and around 0:09 the "Ri - Mi" ("D# - E" in your piece).
I think this type of half-step (most of the time from bottom to the top(?) I mean stepping up a half-step we could call it one of Mozart's signature pitch-writing.

As a mini-tip: I think you can do this half-step-up-melody-trick on almost any note, except "Li - Ti" ("A# - B" in C major key), because "A#" or "Bb" however we call it at the place of the context in C major key most likely it would sound like the "Fa" note of F major key, it would sound like the "Tay" note of C dominant chord, and "Fa usually want's to go a half-step down, instead of down, at least in the case of a C dominant 7 chord, if you would play for ex. a C dominant 7 chord and then a G or a G dominant 7 chord to force the A# go half step up to B, then I think it would not sound right in a classical-classical context, it would sound almost like a certain part of a blues chord progression especially if we would chose to use only dominant 7 chords.
Probably I wrote this explanation unneseseraliy complicated and too long, sorry about that 🙂 It's not that important,
but in an easier way I could say that my tip is that I think you can do these half-step-Mozart-y-pitch-writing:
C# - D
D# - E
E -F
(probably even F - F#)
F# -G
G# - A
(but CAN'T do A# - B)
B - C too I guess

I can't explain well why I think this, this is just my intuition, probably I'm wrong somewhere, others might tell us where.

Another little thing is that I think the Alberti-bass was a good choice to start with, I think Mozart liked to use it a lot!

As I wrote earlier I don't know much about Mozart, but these are the things that I've noticed immediately even by not knowing Mozart too much so you made even me recognize the essence of Mozart in your piece, so I think you are on the right track!

 

Thanks!

That accidental had a expecific name, I don't remember now (this mind-games), and Indeed he uses more this. The part that I think actually fits more Mozart-style is the closure of the second theme, but alberti-bass, accidentals, and others are actually very recognisable in Mozart.

Thanks a lot for the comment

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@Lotsy piano  @Guillem82    That is called ritardation (when the non-chord tone resolves upwards) or appoggiatura (when it resolves downwards). I think you can write A# - B in the context of C maj (for example with a G or G7).   In m. 62 there is a false appoggiatura because the A# is, in fact a Bb, part of C7, and it would be odd an appoggiatura resolving an augmented second.

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1 minute ago, Luis Hernández said:

@Lotsy piano  @Guillem82    That is called ritardation (when the non-chord tone resolves upwards) or appoggiatura (when it resolves downwards). I think you can write A# - B in the context of C maj (for example with a G or G7).   In m. 62 there is a false appoggiatura because the A# is, in fact a Bb, part of C7, and it would be odd an appoggiatura resolving an augmented second.

 

The second is a mistake of scoring 😂😂 thanks for explaining It better than i could

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29 minutes ago, Luis Hernández said:

That is called ritardation (when the non-chord tone resolves upwards) or appoggiatura (when it resolves downwards).

What you described for ritardation is correct. When the Non-chord tone resolves down, it is called a suspension(Edit: assuming its holding over from the previous chord, I probably look dumb now....).

This is an appoggiatura:

image.png.3fa4bb212a7f0ace80f7b4aa62e35785.png

http://openmusictheory.com/embellishingTones.html

Edited by i(don't)suckatcomposing
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@i(don't)suckatcomposing

When a non-chord tone resolves downwards:

It is a suspension if it starts in a weak position.

It is an appoggiatura if it starts in a strong position (usually the appoggiatura is unprepared, by leap).

 

See the example (the other are different types of non-chord tones).836185909_Capturadepantalla2019-12-06alas19_57_44.thumb.png.1b6a6808a66e1a02647b092069f26a46.png

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1 hour ago, Luis Hernández said:

It is a suspension if it starts in a weak position.

 

1 hour ago, i(don't)suckatcomposing said:

Edit: assuming its holding over from the previous chord, I probably look dumb now....).

Yea, thats what I meant, I wasn't using any brain cells... 

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@Luis Hernández @i(don't)suckatcomposing Thank you very much for your corrections! I've learnt something today again, that's why I like this forum! :)

@J.Santos Ah yes you are right about that part (the scale-sequence part, right?), it also really Mozart-sounding, so that's another good spot! It really reminded me to the KV 545 1st movement's same type of scale-sequence, it starts with a short arpeggio/brokenchord upwards, then the scale goes down, and then the sequence repeats a note lower diatonicly (diatonically(?)).

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