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FALL, 2016: COMPETITION RESULTS

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FALL 2016: Competition Results!

 

Congratulations to all the people who entered the competition. These are my favorite types of pieces to write and I’m glad I got to share that love with all of you. Without further ado here are your totaled scores and final results. Thank you all!

 

Luderart - Eleven Piano Variations on Elgar's Violoncello Concerto's First Movement's Theme
Monarcheon: 49/100

Sonataform: 70/100

Ken320: 90/100

TOTAL: 209/300

 

ChristianPerrotta - Variações sobre o Siriá 

Monarcheon: 69.5/100
Sonataform: 96/100
Ken320: 90/100
TOTAL: 255.5/300

bkho - Variations on "Happy Birthday

Monarcheon: 80/100

Sonataform: 86/100

Ken320: 97/100 

TOTAL: 263/300

 

danishali903 - Variations on a Theme By J. Brahms 

Monarcheon: 75/100

Sonataform: 96/100

Ken320: 98/100

TOTAL: 269/300

 

SebastianViola - 5 Variations on a theme from "Peter and the Wolf" for String Quartet 

Monarcheon: 61.5/100

Sonataform: 84/100

Ken320: 97/100

TOTAL: 242.5/300

 

Emiliano Manna - Seven Variations on a Rossini's Theme

Monarcheon: 83/100

Sonataform: 96/100

Ken320: 100/100

TOTAL: 279/300

 

Noah Brode - Variations on a Theme of Dvořák 

Monarcheon: 62/100

Sonataform: 89/100

Ken320: 83/100

TOTAL: 234/300

 

TJS - Some More Variations on a Theme by Mozart 

Monarcheon: 70/100

Sonataform: 83/100

Ken320: 86/100

TOTAL: 239/300

 

RANKINGS:
1. EmilianoManna (279/300)

2. danishali903 (269/300)

3. bkho (263/300)

 

Congratulations Emiliano Manna!

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Judge KEN320 - SCORES:

 

Danishali903 - Variations on a Theme by Brahms

Good choice of a theme for this excellent set of variations. I liked them all, don't really have a favorite. Though there was contrast between the movements in mood, tempo, meter and complexity, they were all satisfyingly unified. I found that within each movement there was, ironically, more contrast. That is to say, in response to your concerns about how to vary a work that already contains a good degree of development - how do you develop it? I think that you solved that problem with orchestration.

By choosing only parts of the theme, a phrase, for example, you played it sometimes for color, or drama, or just for the sheer joy of showing the audience what an orchestra can do. Great use of dynamics and of playing one section against another in nineteenth century fashion. I know little of Brahms' orchestral works, but I have played a couple of his piano works. There is a certain logic in his harmonic thinking, that like Beethoven, he wants you to notice. He wants you to see the seams of the fabric he is stitching together. He wants you to see how it's made. I think you've made that clear here with your wonderful score.

So this is a wonderful presentation of nineteenth century writing that Brahms would also give you a thumbs up on. For the score I would give you higher than 20 pts. if I could. Well done. I am taking a point off for sound because of the distortion in the loud parts. This kind of thing should be easily fixed.

Clarity of theme 20/20

Uniqueness of Variation 19/20

Instrumental writing 20/20

Score 20/20

Length 15/15

Sound 4/5

Score: 98

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Variations on Happy Birthday, by BKH

I love the concept and the execution, as well as the perfect - and forgone - conclusion of the choice of instrument: piano. I welcomed the choice before I grasped the full extent of the concept, because it allows the listener to focus on the theme and variations without distraction. And choosing such a banal theme is exactly what Ludwig Van would do too.

The references to Beethoven, Rachmaninoff and Liszt are great fun! Although I only got the Beethoven Moonlight Sonata and the Presto from the 7th Symphony, the tarantella. My fault, not yours, I'm sure. Your comprehensive knowledge of the overall style and particulars of these works enabled you to pull this off to great effect. I don't think anyone could have done it better. First, to appreciate your variations to Beethoven's later sonatas requires a general acknowledgment of how far he pushed the envelope, as what the player could play, the piano could deliver and the public comprehend. You approached these issues seamlessly and with more clarity as the variations became more and more inventive. After a while it was clear to me that you might venture into delirium, as Beethoven did, and I was not disappointed. True to form, just when you thought he reached a full climax he took it a step further. You did this as well, with full abandon and passion.

The score was sparse in markings, but that is totally fine. However, it could have used some improvement in these areas -

like eliminating needlessly difficult ledger lines, and using 2-part voicing in the right hand to better describe the right hand.

Some other observations:

Maestoso: Some doubling of the third on first inversion chords. Still a no-no.

 

Allegro non troppo: Bar 78. Octave and a half jumps with the whole arm into a new position, impossible or nearly so. It's not just once but over and over. They said the four minute mile record was impossible to break. Then later it was. So I guess it's possible someone could play this. But since this was done with a computer you cannot prove it's doable. So I have to take off a point for this, even if the intellectual aspect is spot on.

Vivace: Should have beamed the eighth notes, but - hold on - I think you were being true vintage here?

Allegro non troppo: Bar 138-188, a beautiful little transition back to the main theme. Sometimes these little things make all the difference. Good balance of length of variations.

Andante Cantabile: Sort of a Minuet, only in 4/4. Suitably short and charming. Nice touch with melody in L. H.

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There is a point at which the writing becomes less idiomatic to the piano due to the extreme demands placed upon the player. The fast parts like in the coda are of less concern than the extreme octave jumps at tempo as mentioned.

 

Fantastic work, a real tour de force. Also, an American audience will appreciate the blue note you snuck in at the very end (C natural) "and many more…"

Clarity of variations 20/20

Uniqueness of variations 20/20

Instrumental writing 19/20

Score 18/20

Length 15/15

Sound 5/5

Score: 97

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Christian Perrotta, Variacoes sobre o Siria

Your modest submission was quite enjoyable in all aspects. You chose a theme that was developed mostly through natural,organic improvisation, which you captured in your score. You increased the ornamentation as the overall piece progressed, which I appreciated. Some of which you did not notate, but I'm not taking off points for that because it is idiomatic in this style that a gifted performer would be expected to improvise on top of what is written.

The variations are more similar than not so I am taking points off for that, but otherwise  the performance was fine and the sound was good too. If I could give you more for sound I would.

Clarity of variations 15/20

Uniqueness of variations 15/20

Instrumental writing 20/20

Score 20/20

Length 15/15

Sound 5/5

Score: 90

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Emeliano Manna - Variations on a theme by Rossini

After the enigmatic introduction, the music goes off on a fun adventure, giddy in its purpose, and never lets up. The tension is held throughout by its notable invention, protracted syncopation, and breathless, jack-rabbit juxtapositions as each section is shot off before the listener has had a chance to digest the last one. Wow!

As fun as it was to hear, it would be sheer joy to play. Part high opera, part Bugs Bunny, this work gets a perfect score. Well done, Emiliano.

Clarity of variations 20/20

Uniqueness of variations 20/20

Instrumental writing 20/20

Score 20/20

Length 15/15

Sound 5/5

Score: 100

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Noah Brode - Variations On a Theme by Dvorak

The first variation was not that much different than the stated theme. The tremolos in the violins seemed arbitrary to me. The second variation had a sort of reggae/calypso feel to it, which was nice. The 32nd notes in (Bar 30) are not pluck-able at tempo. Maybe change the figure to 16th notes or bow them as a slur. It's the same with the grace note figures as well in (Bar33). I don't know what you would do there.

Perhaps pluck the grace note and portamento up, or do what guitarists do, hammer-ons. One final suggestion might be to have the 1st violin pluck a E/C double stop and 2nd violin pluck the D/B grace note. You would have to write the rhythm precisely, but it's doable.

Nice segue into the 3rd variation. The tremolo sounds more appropriate here with the menacing key of Fm. You've got some nice tension in the variation in the last few bars.

Then you have a nice waltz and dance in 6/8. I especially liked the transition at (Bars 99-104). ** Be careful not to double the 3rd when it's in the bass.

Variation #6. Good tension with the tremolos, and good choice of chords added to that. A lot of fire and passion in this one.

Variation Six had a nice swing style to it, which gave it an odd gate, which was charming in its own way. It reminded me a little of a drunken sailor. It's just the image that I got from the syncopation and the grace notes.

Variation 7 (H) This made a good enough ending, you didn't really need to restate the theme. I would have liked to have heard less number of movements and each movement to be a little longer. It became slightly tedious at points because you stayed very close, perhaps too close, to the theme, even though you dress it in different clothing (rhythms and meter), some of which were very clever. Basically I think that if you had made the movements a little longer that would have forced you to develop each variation a little more throughout its length.

Clarity of theme 20

Uniqueness of Variation 16/20

Instrumental writing 16/20

Score 16/20

Length 13/15

Sound 2/5

Score: 83

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Ludeart - Variations on Elgar Cello Concerto

The theme as notated on youtube was not harmonized, yet your statement of it was, which was confusing because I thought it was a variation. But no matter. I just ignored the accompaniment. The first variation flipped the long/short rhythm to short/long, which is clever, and unique among the entries.

It's unclear to me why you wrote variation 3 in 6/4. It would be clearer as two bars of 6/8, since it is the same rhythm as the stated theme: quarter/eighth/dotted quarter. Conversely, variation 10 is in 6/8, but there is a very strong ¾ feel. I don't know what you are trying to achieve with this rhythmic ambiguity, since the note values themselves determine the feel of the meter rather than the stated time signature. Meaning, the performance would sound the same regardless of the time signature in my opinion. However, variation eleven is a little different in that the notes as written could be either 6/8 x2 or 6/4. I can hear it either way, but the meter in the melody is a dominant 6/8 to my ears. You didn't mention meter in your reasoning, only mood.

I enjoyed these variations very much. I think the pan-harmonic properties of the theme allow for a lot of freedom in how you write the accompaniment. The theme itself rambled a bit, and any harmonization of it could be nearly anything as long as it stayed within the Em-D-C harmonic space, had an arc of its own and eventually came around to Em in its journey. Your lines with accidentals here and there gave it the necessary interest away from the safe space of Em-D-C.  

I also like the mood, and there is a good variety of lines in your variations. Repeats put to good use. The piano is a perfectly fine choice for the instrumentation, but there is a noticeable lack of dynamic or expression markings.

Clarity of theme 18/20

Uniqueness of Variation 18/20

Instrumental writing 18/20

Score 16/20

Length 15/15

Sound 5/5

Score: 90

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Sebastian Viola - Variations on Peter and the Wolf, Prokofiev

Excellent choice of the theme. You covered a lot of territory in just the first variation. The theme is intact throughout, even in the quartal harmony, which sounded very fresh and novel. In fact, all of the variations were excellent, the theme always apparent regardless of how you dressed it or orchestrated it. There was sufficient contrast between variations, no two were alike, which you demonstrated with very imaginative interplay between instruments. I didn't know what to expect but string quartet proved to be a very good way to portray the theme. And in addition to the contrast between themes there was good contrast within each variation, so they were quite easy to enjoy. The score was well written with all the dynamics and expression markings.

So that's really all I have to say. Well done!

Clarity of theme 20/20

Uniqueness of Variation 20/20

Instrumental writing 20/20

Score 20/20

Length 15/15

Sound 2/5

Score: 97

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TJS - Variations on a theme by Mozart

Good choice of a theme, and the instrumentation is fine, although it doesn't cry out for the intimacy of a string quartet, I'm glad you see a string orchestra in the picture. The pizzicato parts in the first violin are troubling, given the tempo. It's true they can dispense with the bow for the first variation. The player may even use two fingers to pluck instead of just the index finger. Still, the part is demanding and will be fatigued at some point. The following may be a better alternative: (see example, attached) 

 

By splitting the 1st violin onto the 2nd violin you would accomplish three things. Relief of fatigue, lesson the possibility of a mechanical sound, and it would be more fun for the players! Other than that it's a good proper variation.

As you mention in your notes, you gave yourself a lot of leeway in the treatment of the theme. One memorable aspect of the theme is its harmonic motion, which you also played fast and loose with. For example, the stepwise motion of a flat sixth dominant 7th down to the prop dominant 7th is a very prominent sound: Cm-G7-Cm, Ab7-G7. You replaced this with something like Cm-G7-Cm, Ab7-Adim-G7, which is quite different. All of the variations are good in that they work well as pieces in their own right: proper voice leading in the classical style, etc. However, I am obliged to take off points for what I consider going too far off the original Mozart. There is good contrast between the variations,nice balance and good pacing.

 I am also taking points off for bad sound. I realize that it's not high on peoples' concerns relative to the written page, but It think that you - and you are definitely not alone here - should put more attention into the sound. It does make a big difference.

Clarity of theme 15/20

Uniqueness of Variation 20/20

Instrumental writing 17/20

Score 17/20

Length 15/15

Sound 2/5

Score: 86

5850a4fd59b44_MozartPizz..jpg.59bc1f94d51bba3a5ea13438456de24d.jpg

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Judge Monarcheon's Scores!

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JUDGE SONATAFORM’S SCORES

Luderart - Eleven Piano Variations on Elgar's Violoncello Concerto's First Movement's Theme
1. “How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” There are an infinite number of ways one can go about making a variation on a theme. It seems Luderart’s approach could be considered variations with some license. Variations I is the most genuine variation out of the set. It preserves the themes rhythm, structure and length. By variation II Luderart has two repeated sections within a variation. Such a decision is at the expense of theme’s structure. The measure length is over twice that of the original theme as a result of the repeats.

Many of the variations afterward have repeat markings. Luderart’s approach to theme and variation I would consider vary loose. Elements of the theme are present in each of the variations but many liberties are taken with the form. For that reason I see them more as a set vignettes on a theme. Each vignette keeps the initial theme in the mind’s eye but I’d be hard pressed to say I “followed the basis of theme” in each variation. 15/20

2. Many of the variations sounded very similar, particularly I, III, VI and VII. Some new ideas are introduced but the whole vibe of the piece feels a bit stationary. 12/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?”. I’d say the piece is satisfactorily written for the instrument. Everything is playable, though the piano is capable of more variety and timbre than can be found in this piece. But it’s pretty much what I’d expect from Luderart, he has a deliberate minimalist style that’s unique to him. 15/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?”. The score is also satisfactory. All the variations are marked and everything is there to play it successfully. There are no dynamic markings which I find strange. Whether no dynamic change is intended or whether the performer has complete liberty with the dynamics should be stated in the score regardless. 14/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)”. I think the repeats hinder the flow of the piece. But I acknowledge that those repeats were a deliberate decision that Luderart made. By the end I found some monotony creeping in. 12/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?”. A midi recording is a midi recording. 2/5

Total 70

ChristianPerrotta - Variações sobre o Siriá

1. “How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” It’s very easy to follow the theme. 20/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” I found that each variation brought a new dynamic to the piece. I like how a baroque dance suite was integrated into variation form. It was a clever decision that allowed for structure and contrast. 19/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” The composer performs the piece in the recording so it’s definitely playable for the instrument. The full range of the instrument is utilized. 20/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?” There’s only one dynamic marking (mf) and a couple hairpins in variation 5. I would have liked to see more dynamic markings. The phrasing is good though. Tempo markings are very clear. There are some ornaments that are heard in the recording that aren’t notated. Perhaps I’d at least mention in the score that liberties could be taken with ornamentation. Overall pretty good. 18/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” I did not find it monotonous. I wish the piece were just one variation longer. 14/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” Live performance is definite plus and audio quality is good. 5/5

Total: 96
Bkho - Variations on "Happy Birthday"

1. How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?”. It’s pretty clear despite liberties being taken. 19/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” Each variation is distinct from one another. 20/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” Most of the piece is playable. Variation IV would be extremely uncomfortable to play and variation VII could easily wreck a person’s right hand. Overall I’d say the writing is satisfactory but there are a few parts that would need to be revised. 15/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?” Parts of the score are a mess. There are plenty of spots where notes, dynamic markings and phrasing collide. If this piece got published it would need to be edited. 15/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” the length was sufficient. It never felt monotonous to me. 15/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?”. A midi recording is a midi recording. 2/5

Total: 86
danishali903 - Variations on a Theme By J. Brahms

1. How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” It’s very easy to follow the theme in each variation. 20/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” Not only does each variation display great contrast they all compliment each other beautifully. My only complaint is danish’s decision to, more or less, lift the coda from Brahms’ 1st. I think this piece definitely deserves a completely unique and original coda. 17/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” You know your way around the orchestra, great work! 20/20

  1. “How is the quality of the score?” The score looks great! 20/20

  2. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” It feels just a hair

too short. 14/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” It maybe a midi recording but you orchestrated the entire piece, that’s worth a full score (no pun intended). 5/5

Total: 96
SebastianViola - 5 Variations on a theme from "Peter and the Wolf" for String Quartet

1. How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” I could usually follow the theme in each variation, but there were liberties taken with structure. Proportions didn’t always match the theme. The adagio variation was an example of that. I knew for a moment where we were and then I’d get lost and then it would come back. Overall it was pretty good. 15/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” Each variation was pretty unique. The pizzicato variation was very nice. I’m not sure I would have ended it with a slow coda, seems deserving of something a bit up-tempo. 18/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” I’m not a string player but everything appears right and playable for a string quartet. I do wonder about the chord the cellist has to pluck on 18th measure of the adagio variation, looks playable but perhaps a little awkward. 20/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?” The score looks pretty good. With each variation I’d put it’s number and tempo marking in the left hand corner where the tempo markings typically go. It appears attention and care were taken with the dynamics and phrasing. 20/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” I feel the piece needs a couple more up-tempo variations. As mentioned I think the piece would benefit from a spirited ending perhaps. Three of the variations are either adagio or andante so the piece simultaneously felt too short and a bit monotonous. 9/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” A midi recording is a midi recording. 2/5

Total: 84
Emiliano Manna - Seven Variations on a Rossini's Theme

1. How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” It was very clear that each variation was based off the theme. Some liberties in expanding the theme’s

structure and proportions are taken but were worth doing because it added to the piece as a whole. 20/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” Each variation was very unique and though the piece progressively becomes more manic they compliment each other in succession. 20/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” Emiliano knows how to write for piano. I considered for a second to try and learn the piece until I heard the IV variation (yikes). While it would be a difficult undertaking to learn this piece everything here is playable. Emiliano utilizes the instrument’s range, timbre and limitations well.

4. “How is the quality of the score?” The score is very well detailed and overall pleasing to the eye. 20/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)”. I like the ending but it feels rather abrupt, I think perhaps the piece should have one more variation or the coda could be expanded. This piece is certainly anything but monotonous. 13/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” It is a midi recording but it’s clear Emiliano put extra care into making the fluctuations in dynamics, tempo and everything else as realistic as can be expected from a midi recording. 3/5

Total: 96
Noah Brode - Variations on a Theme of Dvo
ák

1. “How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” It was very clear, perhaps a tad too clear. While it’s interesting to see how much one can do with out changing the melody I would have liked to see a little more transformation of the theme. Variation VII stands out because the theme was inverted, but most of the time the initial melody is clearly present. 17/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” Many of the variations are pretty unique but it feels like more risk could have been taken overall. 17/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” There are some double stops that would be awkward, especially in the cello part. I think some revisions would be necessary. But overall it’s playable and Noah utilizes many techniques available to string players, pizzicato, double stops, tremolos, etc... 18/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?” The score looks very good. There’s a lot of detail in dynamics and phrasing. You even have rehearsal markings, way to go! 20/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” The length was good, no complaints. 15/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” A midi recording is a midi recording. 2/5

Total: 89
TSJ - Some More Variations on a Theme by Mozart

1. “How clear was it that the entrant followed the basis of theme in each variation?” It was very clear that each variation is based off the theme. Perhaps a bit too clear. 18/20

2. “How unique was each variation in comparison to both the theme and the preceding variation?” As far as sounding unique within a “classical” language it succeeds for the most part. I think TSJ could have ventured out a bit with more minor variations that explored the theme’s harmonic potential. Overall pretty good.16/20

3. “How well did the entrant write for the instrument?” Variation IV has some double stops that a string player should take a glance at but they look pretty doable to me. I think everything looks fine for a string quintet to play. The first variation takes advantage of plucking but for the most part I feel like the strings aren’t being utilized to their full potential. 18/20

4. “How is the quality of the score?” The score looks pretty good. Perhaps more dynamic markings would be nice. For example, variation IV has only a forte marked at the beginning and double forte at the end. I’d meet with a string player to go over phrase marking for strings. Everything looks pretty good though. 17/20

5. “Is the length practical (or does the piece start sounding monotonous?)” The piece feels a bit too short. I think a couple more minor variations would have helped balance the major ones. The coda should be a bit longer too. Felt like it ended abruptly. The piece never got monotonous. 12/15

6. “How is the quality of the audio?” A midi recording is a midi recording. 2/5

Total: 83 

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Congratulations to all of you for making it this far, and a hearty round of applause from me for our three prize-winners, Emiliano Manna, danishali903 and bkho. I am happy to see that this competition has managed to draw out a great deal of inventiveness and flair from our members, and I was especially pleased with the increased effort at professionalism from our panel of judges. Many thanks to Monarcheon for co-ordinating this competition and seeing it through to fruition. Well done, all!

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Congratulations to everyone, especially the winners! I particularly enjoyed this competition very much! The moments of composing, rehearsing, recording and researching for the program-writing were very fun. Also, thanks for the judges for their patience in writing the reviews, they are much valuable!

I hope the next competition is just as fun as this one^^ (or better!)

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The reviews are so detailed compared to the Summer Competition! This series of entries surprised me each time, so I'm glad you guys are getting the careful critique that I know we so often crave for our work.

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2nd place!!!! Wohooo!!!! I would gladly take this score over what I got during Monarcheon's mock scoring of my other theme and variations! 

Congrats to Emiliano on a much deserved victory! His piece was just...wow! Congrats to all the other entrants too, and a big thank you to all the judges! We had a great turn out and wonderful entries this time around. Hopefully we can sustain this into the future.

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Congrats to everyone! Well done, all. I personally thought every one of the entries turned out well, and I completely agree that the three winners deserved the highest scores. Bravo. Here's to the next one.

In the meantime, it seems I need an in-depth tutorial on how to write for string instruments... :blush:

EDIT: And a huge thank-you to the judges for their hard work; I am already beginning to obsessively read over the comments to the point of absurdity

Edited by Noah Brode
Thank-you to judges

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Yay! I had a lot of fun with this, I really enjoyed everyone else's variations, and it turned out better than expected (next time I'll have to remember to write in bowings though >.>)

27 minutes ago, Noah Brode said:

In the meantime, it seems I need an in-depth tutorial on how to write for string instruments... :blush:

 

No promises, but I am considering compiling a list of resources and my own comments with regards to writing for Viola & Viola (and Cello if I can find any references, as I am not familiar with that one first hand).

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29 minutes ago, SebastianViola said:

No promises, but I am considering compiling a list of resources and my own comments with regards to writing for Viola & Viola (and Cello if I can find any references, as I am not familiar with that one first hand).

That would be extremely helpful! I for one really hope you can find the time to do it. Did you mean violin and viola?

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Oh! I wasn't expecting to fare so well against a lot of solid and large-scale entries (Danish and bkho, for example).

A big, big thanks to all the judges and their detailed insight. They will be extremely useful to polish a Theme and Variations I'm currently working on.

 

A question: I don't know how the hosting rules work for the competition. As a winner, I have to decide the next subject? Or to be a judge? Or I can be a normal participant?

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1 hour ago, Emiliano Manna said:

A question: I don't know how the hosting rules work for the competition. As a winner, I have to decide the next subject? Or to be a judge? Or I can be a normal participant?

The theme for Winter has been decided, but you're welcome to participate again or judge if you'd like!

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Congratulations to Emiliano!  Many thanks to the judges for their hard work in looking at all the works entered in the competition.  While I don't like judging at all, really, I think this would have been a particularly hard one to grade because of the many truly excellent entries, so I'm glad it wasn't my job to sort through it all.  :)

When do the details to the winter competition get announced?

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On 17/12/2016 at 0:07 PM, Emiliano Manna said:

Oh! I wasn't expecting to fare so well against a lot of solid and large-scale entries (Danish and bkho, for example).

A big, big thanks to all the judges and their detailed insight. They will be extremely useful to polish a Theme and Variations I'm currently working on.

 

A question: I don't know how the hosting rules work for the competition. As a winner, I have to decide the next subject? Or to be a judge? Or I can be a normal participant?

BKHO had proposed that the winner in a competition be a judge in the next competition, but as only a nice tradition to have. I think so too. It will lend a certain symmetry to things.

 

Edited by johnbucket
Cleanup

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