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J.Santos

Moment Musicaux in D major

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Posted (edited)

I've abandoning it latelly, but here I bring you a piece I made out of something I improvised:

 

 

Edited by J.Santos
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Great piece! The score looks awesome too, it's always nice to be able to read someone's music, you'll find that more people will be willing to comment with an easy to read score, so kudos to you. 

i like your neoclassical style, great themes and texture, I'm not a big fan of exact repeats, but that's just me. The change to the staccato notes in the left hand was a nice change, one thing that I would consider for future pieces is breathing room. The overall sound of large chunks of your piece kind of got stale in some parts, a simple change in dynamics, or maybe some more rests in the left hand could help in those spots. Harmony seemed a bit shaky in spots with the darker diminished chords.

The coda was really cool, but it felt a little out of place. Overall though I'm just being nit picky. Very well written piece, I'm excited to check out more of your music!

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2 hours ago, Thatguy v2.0 said:

Great piece! The score looks awesome too, it's always nice to be able to read someone's music, you'll find that more people will be willing to comment with an easy to read score, so kudos to you. 

i like your neoclassical style, great themes and texture, I'm not a big fan of exact repeats, but that's just me. The change to the staccato notes in the left hand was a nice change, one thing that I would consider for future pieces is breathing room. The overall sound of large chunks of your piece kind of got stale in some parts, a simple change in dynamics, or maybe some more rests in the left hand could help in those spots. Harmony seemed a bit shaky in spots with the darker diminished chords.

The coda was really cool, but it felt a little out of place. Overall though I'm just being nit picky. Very well written piece, I'm excited to check out more of your music!

 

Thanks! Harmonically talking, everything is just as I want i, Maybe I havent noticed a little mistake and something that should be natural is sharp, but I didn't notice yet. I thought this kind of practice was already known, but in late classical an romantic the repetitions signs could be ignored and are to the interpreter to be used or not (so you decide if you repeat it or not, and which ones you do). Also those are exact repeats, but originally in classical style there were a practice were in a repetition (seconda volta"") the interpreter would improvise and add ornamentations of all kind, and as I see it's very easy in the A section to ornamentate and variate. The personal way I would interpretate this piece is repeating the first 2 sections, where I variate and ornamentate the melody with fillings and and then not repeating the second section. The repeats (except for the D minor section ones) are there because formalities, but as I say, you don't need to strictly obey.

The coda it's very in place, if you would carefully listened each part you would realise that is a not far variation of the end of the section B (in B minor) that leads to D,  but using the andalusian cadence. I'm not still convinced for the final cadence in the last bar to that double D major chord, but It can be easily fixed.

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1 hour ago, MoveEleven said:

You have a natural feeling for harmonic progression. This is a great piece.

 

Thanks a lot!

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Hey Juan, nice composition!

I especially like the coda, I think it's the strongest point in the piece.

On the context you're writing, I don't know if this is useful advice, but I think that something you could improve on this are the transitions. You have sections that start and end in a "vertical line", which doesn't necessarily make up for a smooth transition. Although this is common in the classical period, a bit less so in the early romantic period but still very present, you could perhaps do more to "disguise" the transition between different sections. There are just so many options when it comes to that, I'm sure you can find interesting ways of blurring the lines in the form of the piece in a way that you like, in case you think it's necessary.

Best wishes.

 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Jean Szulc said:

Hey Juan, nice composition!

I especially like the coda, I think it's the strongest point in the piece.

On the context you're writing, I don't know if this is useful advice, but I think that something you could improve on this are the transitions. You have sections that start and end in a "vertical line", which doesn't necessarily make up for a smooth transition. Although this is common in the classical period, a bit less so in the early romantic period but still very present, you could perhaps do more to "disguise" the transition between different sections. There are just so many options when it comes to that, I'm sure you can find interesting ways of blurring the lines in the form of the piece in a way that you like, in case you think it's necessary.

Best wishes.

 

 

Thanks! I thought that specially the transitions are the more smooth in this piece (between repeats), eventhought I would agree that the A major transition could be way better. At least so did most of the people say.

Edited by J.Santos

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Good work and nice piece. Just some observations:

I'm not very fond of repetitions. There are parts where the first part is repeated with addition of a second voice and that's OK, but before that, there is too much repetition (with no variation) for me. I know that's the style, although it's not clear what style is this: classical + romantic. Yes, there is no transitions for the A maj part. Also, I think the "cadenza andaluza" (which is beautiful) doesn't fit here very well.

I can handle with all that, but one thing I often see is taking a pattern for the left hand and fix it "forever". Man, that's an "easy solution". A more than 6 min piece with that feature is quite rare to see. In the romantic period arpeggios are used for sections (usually they change with other sections) but the melody in romanticism is much more rich and ornamented.

I would have written this in 12/8.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Luis Hernández said:

Good work and nice piece. Just some observations:

I'm not very fond of repetitions. There are parts where the first part is repeated with addition of a second voice and that's OK, but before that, there is too much repetition (with no variation) for me. I know that's the style, although it's not clear what style is this: classical + romantic. Yes, there is no transitions for the A maj part. Also, I think the "cadenza andaluza" (which is beautiful) doesn't fit here very well.

I can handle with all that, but one thing I often see is taking a pattern for the left hand and fix it "forever". Man, that's an "easy solution". A more than 6 min piece with that feature is quite rare to see. In the romantic period arpeggios are used for sections (usually they change with other sections) but the melody in romanticism is much more rich and ornamented.

I would have written this in 12/8.

 

 

You got some points there. I specially disagree with the 12/8 since this piece is 2/2 and I don't feel like 12/8 is the right way of grouping them.

 

I think I will change the bass part in the second part with D and A major section

Edited by J.Santos

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On 5/22/2020 at 11:43 PM, antimusicale said:

No doubt one of the most innovative works around here, liked a lot to hear!! 

 

 

Thanks, but I wouldn't say innovative, because I use late-classical and romanticism a lot xD. The difference is that sometimes I try to introduce "innovative" things, but not that much, but I also have to agree because meanwhile I try to find my own style (in classical-romantic) most of people just try to imitate rachmaninoff, beethoven, mozart or bach, and that's awesome, but not new.

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