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Hello everybody,

 

Today I finished my fourth symphony. To be honest, I hate to write orchestral music, because it feels like I am drowing in an ocean of possibilities and material.
Yet I wanted to 'practice' my orchestration skills. The form of the piece is inspired by mosaic form, because for me recognition is one of the driving factors in the music.
The lay-out and final corrections still have to be done. I am sorry for the very small staves, but this is needed, otherwise not all instruments could stand on the page.

''Randstad'' is the name of the area located in the West of Holland (Amsterdam, Den Haag, Rotterdam, Utrecht). It is one of Europe's bussiest 'metropoles' (7 million) and this is where most of the economical, social and political activities take place. 
I don't live in the Randstad, but in the middle of the Netherlands, where actually nothing exciting happens. What I wanted to express with this symphony is the chaotic, but also rich character of the Randstad.

I am actually pretty satisfied with the result. What do you think? Any feedback or comments?

 

Maarten

 

(The mp3 file is called ''Nederland,'' which is wrong.)

Edited by Maarten Bauer
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Wow. What a great, nice job.

This Form works fine with this language. And I think you've fulfilled the expectations of the Mosaic Form (every part is part of a cointinuum with no beginning-no end). I'm glad you've used this contemporary harmony. Very well balanced, it's modern enough but it has also a classic feeling. I suppose you studied that Stravinsky's symphony... The score is full of indication, as it has to be.

Congrats! I love it.

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5 minutes ago, Luis Hernández said:

Wow. What a great, nice job.

This Form works fine with this language. And I think you've fulfilled the expectations of the Mosaic Form (every part is part of a cointinuum with no beginning-no end). I'm glad you've used this contemporary harmony. Very well balanced, it's modern enough but it has also a classic feeling. I suppose you studied that Stravinsky's symphony... The score is full of indication, as it has to be.

Congrats! I love it.

 

Thank you so much!

It always feels good when you hear you have done your work well!
I have indeed studied Stravinsky's symphony and it was a very interesting and learnful project.

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Hmmm...I kind of like it, which is bit unusual for me.

I tend not to like contemporary orchestral musical, maybe because of the complexity involved.

But I feel there is somehow a fine balance in this piece, despite its many "flowbreaking" moments.

I don´t know if flowbreaking is the right word, but I hope you get what I mean.

I can´t hear on the music, that you hate to make orchestral music. It "sounds" like you had fun doing this. :-)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kimoworld said:

Hmmm...I kind of like it, which is bit unusual for me.

I tend not to like contemporary orchestral musical, maybe because of the complexity involved.

But I feel there is somehow a fine balance in this piece, despite its many "flowbreaking" moments.

I don´t know if flowbreaking is the right word, but I hope you get what I mean.

I can´t hear on the music, that you hate to make orchestral music. It "sounds" like you had fun doing this. :-)

Hello,

I interpret the 'I kind of like it, which is bit unusual for me.'' as a compliment. Thank you!

Philosophising about music is a daily accupation for me. I realised that balance and recognition are two elements that in my opinion cannot absent in music, so one of my main goals when composing is to always remain a certain balance through the entire work. You are right that some moments break the flow, but this doesn't have to be wrong. I like how mosaic form can break the flow, but the musical arc still remains clear.

Actually, I don't hate to write orchestral music, but I will hate it in the long term. Maybe I should have written: I like to write orchestral music, but finishing it is a task that I don't see as enjoyment.

Anyway, I am glad you liked it!

Maarten

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I think sometimes we have so present the classic Forms and its essentials (parts A, B, C.. that complete a cycle) that when we listen to something different, as don't get what we expect, it seems odd.

But, sinceriy, I don't see this symphony as a ABAB form or whatever, at least once I've listened to it... 

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20 hours ago, Luis Hernández said:

I think sometimes we have so present the classic Forms and its essentials (parts A, B, C.. that complete a cycle) that when we listen to something different, as don't get what we expect, it seems odd.

That's a very interesting point you make. The nature of people is that we tend to like things more when we are well-known with it.
For instance, many children dislike sprout, because it tastes bitter. These children still have to learn eating sprouts. The same goes up for music taste. A half year ago I hated listening to Stravinsky and Xenakis. Now these are frequently played composers in my playlist on my iPod.
A great part of liking things has to do with getting accustomed to it.

17 hours ago, MusicianXX12 said:

At least, it has its own aura and dynamics. Contemporary and compact. Interesting to listen to.

Thank you for your comment!

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36 minutes ago, Kimoworld said:

Hi Maarten

Since you like this kind of music,  (Mosaic music)

I feel that I should tell you about my composition :"Water" which reminds a little bit of your piece.

I am bit curious as to what this Mosaic music exactly is.

Is it something like this ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_form

 

Where can I find that composition? I am curious now!

I didn't hear about it neither until a few weeks ago. Luis introduced the Mosaic Form to me when I asked for feedback on my Saxophone Quartet No.3 ''Medea.''
Another name for Mosaic Form is indeed Moment Form.

The principle of Moment Form is that you compose many different and contrasting themes or elements, which are all very characteristic so that they can be recognised very easily when played again. Instead of a continual rondo (ABACABA), the themes can be placed in a somewhat random order. The theme scheme of this symphony would be:

A B A' C D C' E F G B A'' H I C E' F' G' B' J K L B C'

Luis recommended me to study Stravinsky's Symphonies for Winds. The master uses Mosaic Form in this piece, which can be found here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4381PcVUrU

The score with music (piano reduction and played by piano solo) can be found here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwxpCaLScy8

I hope this helps! Good luck!

Maarten

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Hi Maarten

You can find my composition "Water" on my profile.

I have uploaded it to the site.

It is not Mosaic music, but has a rather contemporary feel to it I would say. 

Kim

 

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This is a perfect representation of the Randstad. I speak from 20 years (and going on) of experience living there. ;)

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14 hours ago, Kimoworld said:

Hi Maarten

You can find my composition "Water" on my profile.

I have uploaded it to the site.

It is not Mosaic music, but has a rather contemporary feel to it I would say. 

Kim

I will look at it now!

1 hour ago, DirkH said:

This is a perfect representation of the Randstad. I speak from 20 years (and going on) of experience living there. ;)

 

Dankjewel! Good to hear that my intention to create a representation of the Randstad worked out perfectly for you!

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Hello! I am a new member of this community and just wanted to say I really liked this one. I really would like to orchestrate my music as professionally as you do! I tend to compose more "video-game/film like" type of music, so my music is very different than this, but I´ve always admired how complex and interesting things can be expressed by people who really know how to orchestrate. In fact, I will get Samuel Adler´s book on "The Study of Orchestration" in order to improve. Do you have any advice or maybe a book recommendation for someone that wants to get better at this? Thanks & Congrats! ;)

Edited by Juan José

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On 30-6-2017 at 2:50 AM, Juan José said:

Hello! I am a new member of this community and just wanted to say I really liked this one. I really would like to orchestrate my music as professionally as you do! I tend to compose more "video-game/film like" type of music, so my music is very different than this, but I´ve always admired how complex and interesting things can be expressed by people who really know how to orchestrate. In fact, I will get Samuel Adler´s book on "The Study of Orchestration" in order to improve. Do you have any advice or maybe a book recommendation for someone that wants to get better at this? Thanks & Congrats! ;)

 

I am very sorry for my late response! I was offline due to sailing camp.

I am glad you like this symphony. Thank you for the great compliment about prefessional orchestration!
As an adolescent I don't have much money for theory books like Samuel Adler's The Study of Orchestration. I have never read it, but most of the professional composers recommend it. So if you can afford to buy it, buy it!
A half year ago I started to study orchestration (of which I had never heard before... oops) and I bought the book The Anatomy of the Orchestra by Norman del Mar. I really like the book, although it isn't a manual for orchestration, rather a treatise:
''A detailed treatise and study of orhestral practice, written for conductors, players, students and for everyone concerned with the performance of orchestral music. The main point of the book is to consider the mainfold difficulties which arise in translating printed scores into living music; it is not a manual of orchestration.''

The other two books about orchestration are Cecil Forsyth's Orchestration and Essential Dictionary of Orchestration by Black and Gerou.
The first one tells the history, usage, characteristics and a lot more about all classical instruments used before World War II. A second edition was published in 1935. Modern instruments like synthesizers are not discussed, because these didn't exist yet.

The latter is a small book that is easy to take away in your bag. All instruments are described in points and sorted in alphabetic order like in a dictionary. When you have read Forsyth's and / or Adler's book this little booklet is very useful, because you can easily find the information you are looking for. Only this book will not be enough. It's just a support.

As a Dutch pupil, reading English books is very hard for me and it costs a lot effort and time. There are no Dutch books about orchestration, but maybe there are some Spanish translation for you, assuming that you are a Spanish speaker. Watching videos on YouTube about orchestration is still intensive for me, but not as much as reading high level books. Some great channels:

Furthermore there is a channel called Smalin (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2zb5cQbLabj3U9l3tke1pg). Malinowski, who is the creator of the Music Animation Machine, posts videos with various fundamental ideas. In some videos all instruments are presented in different colours and shapes and this makes it very easy to see how the composers double instruments or let them play unisono. One example of a video with orchestration as fundamental idea:

The last advice is to write, write and write. Exercise is everything, the more you orchestrate, the better you become!

Thanks again for your compliment and I hope that this is useful for you!

¡Saludos!

Maarten

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Well done Maarten,

I love this piece.  It has just the right balance (in my opinion) of modern and classic to keep my interest to the end.  I love the variety of textures you've stitched together seamlessly, and the scope of the work is impressive.

I've yet to venture into this arena and I suspect it will be a couple of years until I try, but you've marched through the doors and arrived with style :grin:

Mark

 

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On 14-7-2017 at 0:29 PM, Mark101 said:

Well done Maarten,

I love this piece.  It has just the right balance (in my opinion) of modern and classic to keep my interest to the end.  I love the variety of textures you've stitched together seamlessly, and the scope of the work is impressive.

I've yet to venture into this arena and I suspect it will be a couple of years until I try, but you've marched through the doors and arrived with style :grin:

Mark

Thank you very much!

I have been composing since one and a half year of which I have only been composing serious works in the last nine months.
Talented as you are, you can also achieve this in this time, perhaps even better. Try it and finally you will be rewarded with the possibility to write for an ensemble that gives billions of options.

Thanks again,

Maarten

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