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Fanfare for My Brother Score.pdf

 

In a passing conversation, Dr. Thurman had told me about how he was selecting repertoire for orchestra brass literature that included euphonium.  This topic has always been a “thorn in the side” for euphoniumists worldwide especially for me as a compsoer.  Although I knew they would probably never be played, I would write orchestra music with euphonium in college hoping one day the orchestra world would fall in love with instrument.  Reflecting on that “pain”, I told Dr. Thurman I was going to rework a piece specifically just for him to conduct and called his own.  I reached in my vault and throughly revised a piece originally called “Water to Wine” to “Fanfare for My Brother” to show my gratitude to someone who truly is my “Brother from another mother.”

 

Here's from a read-through recorded on the phone.

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I love this piece. It has the essence of old fanfare but it's quite modern at the same time. I like this way of rethinking forms or styles. Beautiful canonic structures. On the other hand, great lesson about brass writing.

Not bad sound using a phone,

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8 hours ago, Luis Hernández said:

I love this piece. It has the essence of old fanfare but it's quite modern at the same time. I like this way of rethinking forms or styles. Beautiful canonic structures. On the other hand, great lesson about brass writing.

Not bad sound using a phone,

 

thank you so much for those kind words.  I love fugues/canons.  They make a composer so disciplined

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47 minutes ago, Markus Boyd said:

This is impressive. Thank you for sharing, and this is a live recording?

 

yessir.  

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Whoooa, that's awesome! Great work, my friend.

It kinda reminds me of Stravinsky's chamber orchestra sound, while using an aesthetic close to that of Charles Ives. That is meant as a compliment.

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Definitely a lively fanfare -and I do love the semi-canonic treatment. My biggest take-a-way is your handling of brass instruments. You definitely have a good inner knowledge of how to write for brass -as well as what they can do. Ironically, I do see the influence of Bolcom on your work (I noted that you studied with him). 

I think many members, myself included, would love to see a well informed post on how to utilize the brass as well as tips and tricks that you could provide from your own experience. 

Compositionally, I think one thing that would be interesting is if instead of having the canons restricted to instrument choir... did you consider perhaps intermingling the canonic material intra-instrumental choir? For instance, the canon starts in the trumpets... perhaps you could have the canon shared amongst members of each choir (1 trumpet, 1 horn, 1 trombone, tuba, and euph). Would be an interesting interplay, I think -and would lend more room for contrapuntal manipulation and variance. 

That said, nice work!

 

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4 hours ago, jawoodruff said:

Definitely a lively fanfare -and I do love the semi-canonic treatment. My biggest take-a-way is your handling of brass instruments. You definitely have a good inner knowledge of how to write for brass -as well as what they can do. Ironically, I do see the influence of Bolcom on your work (I noted that you studied with him). 

I love Bolcom but that was more from my studies with Kevin Korsyn in Bach. Korsyn is a genius and living embodiment of the fugue. He made me RIGHT in that area.  Although it didn't click with me until the last three weeks of that class, it was one of the best taught theory classes I have ever taken.  The other influence is James Aikman, the greatest comp teacher in my LIFE. point blank.  He also made me appreciate the fugue and the reason I preach economy in my writings.

 

5 hours ago, jawoodruff said:

I think many members, myself included, would love to see a well informed post on how to utilize the brass as well as tips and tricks that you could provide from your own experience. 

Okay, if you have a specific question or a multitude, I will do soon! That's a promise.

 

5 hours ago, jawoodruff said:

Compositionally, I think one thing that would be interesting is if instead of having the canons restricted to instrument choir... did you consider perhaps intermingling the canonic material intra-instrumental choir? For instance, the canon starts in the trumpets... perhaps you could have the canon shared amongst members of each choir (1 trumpet, 1 horn, 1 trombone, tuba, and euph). Would be an interesting interplay, I think -and would lend more room for contrapuntal manipulation and variance. 

 

The choir setting was blatant. VERY blatant.  I wanted the harmonies to be in the same color.  Still, that's a  very interesting point.  It would be a different color to have it intra-instrumentally than choirs. Then again, as a brass player, I LOVE CHOIRS!!! Trumpet choirs, horn choirs, trombone choirs, tuba-euph..man, it's my heart! So since this is an orchestra brass piece, I had FUN!

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1 hour ago, maestrowick said:

I love Bolcom but that was more from my studies with Kevin Korsyn in Bach. Korsyn is a genius and living embodiment of the fugue. He made me RIGHT in that area.  Although it didn't click with me until the last three weeks of that class, it was one of the best taught theory classes I have ever taken.  The other influence is James Aikman, the greatest comp teacher in my LIFE. point blank.  He also made me appreciate the fugue and the reason I preach economy in my writings.

 

Okay, if you have a specific question or a multitude, I will do soon! That's a promise.

 

 

The choir setting was blatant. VERY blatant.  I wanted the harmonies to be in the same color.  Still, that's a  very interesting point.  It would be a different color to have it intra-instrumentally than choirs. Then again, as a brass player, I LOVE CHOIRS!!! Trumpet choirs, horn choirs, trombone choirs, tuba-euph..man, it's my heart! So since this is an orchestra brass piece, I had FUN!

 

I figured it was intentional -just thought maybe other possibilities would further enhance this piece. 

Bolcom's works are played regularly here in Indianapolis. Your use of traditional harmony is very similar to his (figured there was some influence). I'm not the biggest fan of his -but you add a nice, almost jazzy, element to it which makes it a little more my liking (I'm more a fan of the modern, atonal styles.. lol).

 

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Just now, maestrowick said:

Indy?  James Aikman is the composer in residence with Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra

 

Yes, Indy. I didnt even know we had a chamber orchestra until last week -and I was raised here. Lol

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If you ever want to learn more about composition, I strongly recommend studying with Aikman. Strongly strongly recommend.   He is a MASTER!!!!   

Another great one is Michael Schelle there, my compositional grandfather.   He teaches at  Butler.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, maestrowick said:

If you ever want to learn more about composition, I strongly recommend studying with Aikman. Strongly strongly recommend.   He is a MASTER!!!!   

Another great one is Michael Schelle there, my compositional grandfather.   He teaches at  Butler.

 

 

 

I had the pleasure of meeting and studying with Schelle in the 90s as part of the Great Lakes Music Camp at Butler. He was my first introduction to modern music. He is definitely an awesome resource at Butler and an often silent voice here in Indy. Sadly, Indy is quite conservative musically -aside from him and the faculty at IU in Bloomington. Modern music aesthetics arent quite appreciated here. That's why I studied in Chicago. My teachers at Roosevelt were amazing and I couldnt have asked for a better conservatory experience.

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You have a very unique style. Just as I can tell if it's in the style of Ravel or Debussy, I am starting to get a sense of "maestrowick"s style. It's new.

Edited by Left Unexplained
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12 hours ago, Left Unexplained said:

You have a very unique style. Just as I can tell if it's in the style of Ravel or Debussy, I am starting to get a sense of "maestrowick"s style. It's new.

 

wow!!!  Thanks for those kind words!!

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