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  1. Welcome to the newly re-opened Lessons Department - offering one-on-one virtual lessons with our faculty of skilled and knowledgeable teachers. Help this section grow by signing up today!! The lesson-plan/curriculum is to be determined and decided on a case-by-case basis between student and teacher. The appeal of this method is that it allows the most freedom for both parties to customize the appraoch and to tailor each series of lessons to the particular topic and to the people involved. Please understand that at this point, teachers are generiously volunteering their time to help; try and
    10 points
  2. Good evening everyone, I am excited to present a new piece I have been working on: "Sinfonietta No. 2 for Large Orchestra". I have been working on this piece since last December (with a few interruptions due to the pandemic and life in general) and just added the finishing touches this last week. I chose what you might call an "extended" sonata form, with a longer introduction, exposition of two themes, development, recapitulation, and resolution/coda. I am interested in any and all constructive feedback. Since I just completed this piece, I'm very interested and open to ideas on how it c
    8 points
  3. Hello! Here is a new piano sonata allegro movement that I've written during the pandemic. I'd welcome any feedback you might have. 🙂 Dan
    7 points
  4. IN A DIFFERENT WORLD YC Composer Competition - Summer, 2020 Thank you to all of the entrants for submitting their works. Everyone should be proud for finishing their pieces at such a high general standard of quality. And thank you also to my fellow judges for their work in this process as well. The competitions are one of the most engaging features on this forum, and help 'keep the blood flowing', so to speak, so I'm very pleased that this competition turned out to be so popular. And now, without further ado, I present the final scores from our competition. MEMBER VOTING:
    7 points
  5. This is the wrong question to be asking. The question you should be asking is what do i want to write, a hollywood movie score or a classical work? Film composition and classical composition are two completely different disciplines and the music is structured in completely different ways. Several composers' work inhabits a sort of neutral zone between the two (e.g. Vaughan Williams, Leonard Bernstein, Tan Dun) but all of those composers started out in the classical world with rigorous training—their first loves were classical works or popular music, rather than film scores—and went on
    7 points
  6. Thanks everybody, i love all of you ❤️
    6 points
  7. IN A DIFFERENT WORLD YC Composer Competition - Summer, 2020 We live in a bit of an unprecedented time and it seems that many of us are, understandably, feeling many emotions ranging from anger to fatigue to even hope. Whatever your reaction, welcome to this summer's competition, where you'll attempt to express it as creatively as possible. I. Topic: Compose a piece that in some way mirrors one's reaction to the 2020 global pandemic and how it may or may not sway or adapt over time into something else. II. Eligibility: 1. You must be a member of the Young Composers forum
    6 points
  8. Hello, I will be posting the submissions for the Summer 2020 Competition as replies to this thread. I will send out a notice to all the entrants once all of the submissions have been uploaded. Each entry will be randomly assigned a letter (A, B, C, D, etc.). Thank you in advance for your patience, and congratulations to all of the entrants for completing your submissions.
    6 points
  9. Hello Young Composers, I want to take this time to discuss a new development I have been working on, which is a standalone music notation program for Windows. The program will integrate with this website which will include comments and music management/uploads. I haven't made any official announcements because I wanted to make sure I was actually able to follow through. The first version of this program will be for Windows, and I am happy to say that none of this will be outsourced. Because it will not be outsourced, fixing issues or adding new features will be much easier to accomplis
    6 points
  10. I like how Richard Strauss, ever the egomaniac, said on his deathbed, "It's a funny thing, Alice, dying is just the way I composed it in Death and Transfiguration."
    6 points
  11. Austenite deserved it. He's a great composer and a real contributor to YC. Well done champ!
    6 points
  12. More often than not, these kinds of associations are tiring for me (and tend to reveal how dull people are), not that there is anything wrong with the music of Debussy creating images of fauns and the body of music written in the last 100 years homogenously sounding like "people getting murdered". I think people desperately try to find something that music reminds them of, as if every piece of music written needs to be something else in addition to music. For me, I interpret kinds of energies from music. These energies can't really be properly explained: it's a visceral feeling.
    6 points
  13. in his sumptuous new york city mansion, charles wuorinen sits rubbing his aged, gnarled hands with a wicked smile atop his towering pile of ill-gotten riches, pondering to what new devious ends he can put the nefarious twelve-tone system invented his brethren in the academic illuminati.... to be continued
    6 points
  14. English isn't everybody's native language. If you look at Marzique's profile it says he's from Mexico so it is likely that English isn't his native language. Either way, maybe you should cut him some slack. You understood the point of his post regardless of any grammatical issues so I don't see what the problem is. Also, if we're going to be pedantic about grammar, the comma in the above quote should be a semicolon.
    6 points
  15. I couldn't agree more. Far too much aesthetic emphasis is given to elevating the surface style of music - or indeed any other narrative artform; cinema, literature, even painting - above other deeper elements that are often more fundamental to making music music. Specifically, what a piece sounds like has only a limited role in defining its worldview and aesthetics, and often has the irritating side-effect of pigeon-holing it under some vague term as 'classical', 'romantic' and so forth. I've said this before but there are certain deep aspects of music that are common to almost all works even
    6 points
  16. Overlooking intricacies the Concepts despite contributing the cogent conceptualization of Musiotics your ideas are. I would say deriving Parallels which in itself, allowing despoiliation per se, (the Infinite within Cosmos and the Infinitesimal) disallowing Universal. It inanity is the music; Profane within compounded cannot be compared to the like and of Baroque music, the Classical neo-Romanticism. The context Beneath which of viewpoints rhombus Divine and not misconstruing integral Shifts, bijective and non-local. Relativism is blurred, "dividing by itself" another Which all Pretentiousness
    6 points
  17. Since most of the answers are, sadly, silly jokes, let me try: First listen to all finest concertos for bassoon. Pay close attention to form, motivic gradations, harmonic background, orchestration, the usage of the instrument. But you should inform us, how much experience do you have as a composer and which composers you favour as your influences. I remember when I started to compose at the age of 18, I wrote an oboe concerto with strings. It is terrible, since I had no knowledge of form and motivic workout. I made some melodies in oboe and use strings as a background harmonies with occasion
    6 points
  18. I've posted this before numerous times, but here's a quick rundown of how the cognitive process works and how it relates to music: The first thing to notice and acknowledge is the overlapping between the language and the music areas of the brain, as music uses many of the same mechanisms we use when we hear people talk. In essence, our ability to draw out emotion out of a piece has a two facets. 1) We are wired to extrapolate emotional content out of arbitrary patterns, like we do in speech. For example, an angry person shouting in a language you don't understand can (imagine this over the
    6 points
  19. A thought: Can we PLEASE get rid of the stupid "reputation" thing where people vote posts up and down? It's been abused by people that don't like other people (such as BDW consistently voting my posts down). It doesn't help to the site, simple as that.
    6 points
  20. My first competition piece and first score. I stayed on a specific point and re used motives for the first time. Would love to hear what you think (also, I really appreciate the member voting, thank you so much!)
    5 points
  21. @Tónskáld @Monarcheon @Noah Brode Thank you all for making this possible. 🙂
    5 points
  22. Tried my hand at @Ivan1791's challenge just for fun and whipped up something quickly. I think it's pretty fun! The justification for the last variation is that each beat in the right hand uses (0148) which is the "dissonant" chord's pitch class set. Enjoy!
    5 points
  23. My Piano Sonata No.1 in F Minor composed in 2018. The sonata has 3 movements and is written in a romantic style. The first movement is in rondo form. The second consists of a prelude and a short fugue, and the final movement is more free in its form. The sonata is inspired by some of the works of Chopin and Beethoven. I'd be interested in any feedback. Sorry about the awful recording quality.
    5 points
  24. The suite's finally up! A lot of movements have been posted here already, but it is a different experience all the way through (if I do say so myself 🙂). Movements 3 and 5 have not been uploaded here before if you want to skip to those, though. Enjoy!
    5 points
  25. Here is a little impromptu I wrote a few weeks ago. What do you think ?
    5 points
  26. Hi all, I've not posted anything here for quite a while, been busy with other things, but I've also been working to finish my first fully orchestrated piano concerto. The first movement was posted here about a year ago, but the second and third movements are new. The first movement has also been edited and hopefully improved as I added a short cadenza that I felt was missing from the first movement, as well as changing the odd passage here and there. Anyway, I'm pretty pleased with the final edit. As always, any comments are welcome and gratefully received.
    5 points
  27. I have refrained from commenting directly on individual pieces until I have a chance to review all the entries after the deadline but I wanted to extend my respect and congratulations to all of you. This is really what this is about, inspiring the composition of truly outstanding pieces in the spirit of friendly competition. I look forward to hearing the all the other entries! Happy composing to all.
    5 points
  28. All right, randomizing done! Here are the results: Aquatunic will work on JFTF's theme Luder will work on Pater's theme Christian will work on Austenite's theme Pater will work on Danish's theme Danish will work on Dan's theme Dan will work on KJ's theme JFTF will work on Christian's theme KJ will work on Luder's theme Austenite will work on Aqua's theme We can hash out the deadline details later. I'm also guessing there are no rules regarding instrumentation, but I think we should keep the length at most 10 minutes.
    5 points
  29. Bah, people waste time with things they aren't competitive with all the time. Having been on both the hiring, and the being hired, side of the equation, I can tell you, it's often just about showing up and being pleasant to work with. No one person I've ever worked with was ever perfect at all aspects of their job. We are all good enough. When the printer jams, we all try taking it apart and pushing random buttons together, and suddenly it miraculously works again, and we have no idea why. We don't live at risk of being eaten by tigers any more and the world isn't as dog-eat-dog as y
    5 points
  30. Be the change you wish to see in this world, even a tiny virtual nook. A church is not made of walls, but rather it's people. Is the dissension among you really all derived from a lack of leadership? Is it that you do not see the colored names of the moderators in the discussions you hold with importance? Is it that when you look at the shoutbox you see nothing but BOOM instead of getting to know the people who you have found a common bond in music? Is it that the focus of this website harboring composers who have chosen a love or passion or even a profession that is lucrative only in pen
    5 points
  31. Maybe we should have a poll for those who write tonal music? Poll: Those who write tonal music do so because they are copping out, lack imagination, and can only do style copies? Yes of course you silly bird. Would you like to join me in selling those tonalists quill pens, lead mascara, and powdered wigs! Ah only a few can truly get away with writing good tonal music since much of the possibilities of tonal music have been exhausted! Of course not, there are all sorts of tonality - pick one shall we? Indian ragas? Arabic maquams? Western major/minor scale - or octatonic as Schubert
    5 points
  32. I view the process of creating a work as being akin to rearing a difficult child. You use all of your spirit to try to mold him into something sensible, pleasant, intelligent, and handsome, but he thwarts you at every turn, and in the back of your mind you know you will eventually fail. Nonetheless, you endure his trials as much as you are able. Once you are absolutely exhausted and emotionally depleted, even though he is not perfect, you abandon him to the world and hope for the best. contrary to what we all learned in grade school, there is not an absolute dichotomy between simile a
    5 points
  33. I'm still stunned. But let me make a try... *shows up late, runs through the red carpet, is greeted by a mocking Billy Crystal and a thrilled Anne Hathaway, while Christian Bale shows up pushing a cart full of statuettes* Acceptance Speech Follows :facepalm: : This comes as a major surprise for me, as there were so many quality compositions on the run :blush: . I can barely find any words :happytears:, except for a really big and heartily Thank You to the whole YC community, especially for those whose support showed up through the vote. I must also congratulate the other winners, es
    5 points
  34. Better to look at the silver lining: you're among the first YC members (if not the first) of whom a lesser composer writes style-copies ;) .
    5 points
  35. too optimistic. what the average person knows about classical music: 1. it involves violins and powdered wigs and is very aristocratic 2. some classical composers include beethoven, writer of "für elise"; mozart, writer of "eine kleine nachtmusik"; brahms, writer of the lullaby; handel, writer of the hallelujah chorus; bach, writer of an air about weird fetish underwear. all of these people lived between 300 and 600 years ago. 3. classical music stopped being written around 1900 when it was replaced by big bands and swing. the exception is movie music, all of which is written by john willi
    5 points
  36. 5 points
  37. NathanHathawayAdams You did a fine job telling the general story. Unfortunately, I have never fulfilled ultimate nerdiness and I don't know all my superheros, sad childhood? I know :( so I don't know any specific stories, and you don't give me anything, all you gave me was that he had hard times, became a superhero, and feels sad forever, which is a nice general story line, and enough for the music, but you could have gone soooo much deeper! You could have gone deeper musically too. I didn't hear much dynamic contrast, and there's contrast between two themes here, heroism and personal anguish
    5 points
  38. Orchestral string sections will almost always assume divisi unless explicitly stated otherwise. There are several reasons why, chief amongst them tuning, as a pro band will aim to have every instrument on exactly the same pitch. This is particularly true of harmonics, and they are more difficult to balance in a chord with an open string too. One would only write this as a triple stop in a solo part, and then not expect the player to sustain all three pitches equally, especially at this very quiet dynamic which would not be achievable were this asked for tutti. The reason why the orchestrator w
    5 points
  39. Hi Kahlia, welcome aboard. And lovely name, by the way. Your question is definitely among the more frequently asked ones, so run a search and have a look for some answers that have cropped up over the years, but since I work in media composition for a living I'll offer you some bullet points of my own too so you know what you're getting into. I wrote this as a blog post some time ago, but I'll include it here for you: Learn your tools. Mas­ter them so they’re never in your way, learn their tricks, per­son­al­it­ies, and best practices. Learn to work fast. Then learn to work faster. M
    5 points
  40. I've been given a gift from God. I use it for his Glory.
    5 points
  41. Oh come on... get real you guys (and gals...). This IS an interesting thread, only that it never came to a conclusion due to silly bickering amongst members... So... a conclusion perhaps, if I may (though others may continue as they please): 1. There IS some good music today, but appear to be: a. Buried underneath loads of garbage floating around today b. Be ignored because it's too good for the audience (and the audience is stupid?!?!?!) c. It missing out because the composer(s) are not doing enough promotion themselves (or their publishers?) 2. There also seems to be a consen
    5 points
  42. I like Schumann because of the personal, intimate, and emotional nature of his music. I don't like frogslegs because he's snobbish, arrogant, and an idiot.
    5 points
  43. I've found that if you dump a viola player just before the premiere of your quartet, you get a very altered mood indeed... I call it relational inversion and I've written a paper about it, if anyone's interested.
    5 points
  44. Well this is sadly what passes for discussion lately. Why don't others participate and we can get different opinions? Anything is better than the same 4 people going in circles. That'd also be nice, otherwise might as well not even have this section of the site.
    5 points
  45. ATTENTION: Huge post coming. Close your eyes if you can't take it! I find it interesting that serialism still seems such a hot topic for those "new to it", even though contemporary serialist music is n rare thing. Much of that may have to do with the common misconception Nikolas just cleared up, that "atonal" (or at least not traditionally tonal) music is serial by nature. No doubt though, serialism is an important thing to be aware of even today, for the influence it had on the ("academic") music of the 20th century - and also because many serialist composers were also rather clever minds w
    5 points
  46. As I have checked these works, I think Austenite's Serenade should be selected, unless it's too difficult for the orchestra. ;) Some of the works should not have been sent, they are not yet even on basic level of quality, though.
    4 points
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