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Found 15 results

  1. This is my "Three Sententiae for Two Pianos, Op. 323". It is my first work for the combination of two pianos. I never would have imagined I would compose for that particular combination. However, the idea to compose a set of sententiae came to me almost six months ago, on the day I attended the concert of a piano duet. And so I have realized it now, six months later.
  2. These are my "Two Sententiae for String Quartet Op. 321". Here is the link of my previous set of sententiae for string quartet, again a set of two sententiae: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t36832/two-sententiae-for-string-quartet-op-311/ In the line of reposting some of my older pieces, I had also posted another set of sententiae for string quartet. Here's the link for that: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t36851/three-sententiae-for-string-quartet-op-139-old-deleted-piece-2181/
  3. This is my "Sententia for Viola Op. 319". It is my first solitary sententia. It is the 2nd opus of sententia(e) I have composed for viola, the first being my Op. 169, a set of five senteniae, composed in September 2013. Of course, a viola player may choose to play all 6 together. But I could not but publish this solitary sententia with a separate opus number since it is so far removed in time from that initial set of 5 sententiae. I might later repost that set as part of my posts of old/previously posted but deleted pieces. Here is my updated description of the "sententia/e" as included on the title page of the score of the piece,: The 'sententia' is a musical form I originated in 2013. The word 'sententia' (plural: 'sententiae') is the Latin for the word 'sentence'. The Oxford dictionary defines 'sententia' as "A pithy or memorable saying, a maxim, an aphorism, an epigram; a thought, a reflection." For me a 'sententia' is a musical utterance of a thought that is complete in itself, like a sentence. It is also an utterance that finds no need for any elaboration or development. Hence my sententiae are short pieces that usually come in sets – the current sententia being an exception. In sets of sententiae, the individual sententiae are often related to each other in some way. For sets of sententiae also, it is expected that performers observe a short pause between one sententia and the next and that the audience refrain from clapping during those pauses.
  4. This is my "Two Sententiae for Piano, Op. 315". It is one of those sets of sententiae that are composed of only two sententiae. Sometimes a third or further sententiae are simply not within my inspiration. And I believe that those twin-sententiae-sets are perhaps the more powerful, pure, and "precious" for their "rarity" or scarcity. Here is the link to my previous set of sententiae for piano, posted on August 8, 2018: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t36881/three-sententiae-for-piano-op-312/
  5. These are my "Three Piano Sententiae Op. 312". They are my 8th set of sententiae for piano. Here is the link to the previous set: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t34332/three-sententiae-for-piano-op-284/
  6. This is the second installment of my pieces that were previously published here on Young Composers forum but got deleted during the renovation of the website in late April - early May 2016 and that I am choosing to publish again. As the pieces number 181, I am being cautious at to what I publish this second time. Concerning this set of sententiae, what distinguishes them is that they are the first set of sententiae I ever composed. Therein lies their importance. I think that of the six sets of sententiae for string quartet that I have composed, this is still the best set. Here's how I introduced the pieces back on April 10, 2013 when I first posted theme here: 'Sententia' (plural: 'sententiae') is the Latin for the word 'sentence'. I am naming these pieces 'sentences' since they are pieces that do not manifest any trace of development, nor do they aim to do so. All they do is utter a statement, a sentence - which the Oxford dictionary defines as "A series of words complete in itself as the expression of a thought ... conveying a statement, question, exclamation, or command." a definition which perfectly applies to these pieces. I chose the Latin word 'sententia' to name them because its meaning is broader than its English translation of 'sentence', defined as it is as "meaning, sentence, maxim, epigram" - the other three definitions also applying to some degree to the kind of piece that I have in mind, a piece that is more substantial than a simple, straightforward (and often inconsequential) sentence. Of these three sententiae, my favourite is the second one, which is also the one that I think the most completely embodies my idea of a 'sententia' (the first one still somewhat utilizing the formulas of my soliloquies and bagatelles with its repeat and clear ending, while the third one shows a hint of development). I am posting them as a group since I believe that sententiae, being short and devoid of any development, are best presented in a group. Yet each sententia is complete in itself and in the musical idea/feeling/thought that it seeks to convey. Here's the link to the first old deleted piece that I shared: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t36633/three-fugatos-for-harpsichord-op-222-old-deleted-piece-1181/
  7. This is my 6th set of sententiae* for string quartet. I had posted the previous ones here, but they were deleted during the renovation of the website in May 2016. Maybe I will post one or more of the previous four sets sometime in the future. *The 'sententia' is a musical form I originated in 2013. The word 'sententia' (plural: 'sententiae') is the Latin for the word 'sentence'. The Oxford dictionary defines 'sententia' as "A pithy or memorable saying, a maxim, an aphorism, an epigram; a thought, a reflection." For me a 'sententia' is a musical utterance of a thought that is complete in itself, like a sentence. It is also an utterance that finds no need for any elaboration or development. Hence my sententiae are short pieces that come in sets and are often related to each other in some way. Just like between the movements of a multi-movement piece, I would expect that performers observe a short pause between one sententia and the next. And I would expect that there be no clapping from audiences.
  8. These are my "Two Sententiae for String Orchestra, Op. 309". It is rarely that I compose for orchestra. The last composition, a "Concertino for Classical Guitar and String Orchestra", was composed back in late 2015. I had shared it here almost two years ago. Here is its link: https://www.youngcomposers.com/t33864/concertino-for-classical-guitar-and-string-orchestra/
  9. These are my "Three Sententiae for Violin, Op. 300". Opus 300 being a significant landmark to reach for any composer, I had hoped to mark the occasion with a special post and had offered the pieces to a violinist to perform and record them so that I could post that recording. However, due to various reasons, that hope hasn't materialized. So here is the MP3 of the computer version and the score. I hope you enjoy listening to them. And Happy New Year 2018 to everyone!
  10. These are my Three Sententiae for Bass Clarinet, Op. 301. They are my first set of sententiae for the Bass Clarinet. Previously I have composed two soliloquies for Bass Clarinet. Here are their links: http://www.youngcomposers.com/t34704/soliloquy-for-bass-clarinet-no-1/ http://www.youngcomposers.com/t34896/soliloquy-for-bass-clarinet-no-2/
  11. These are my "Three Sententiae for String Octet, Op. 299". They are my first composition ever for the string octet ensemble. I think I have rather succeeded in composing music fit for the particular characteristics of the string octet ensemble. I would be interested to hear your reviews.
  12. This is my first ever composition for the duo of Alto Saxophone and (French) Horn in F. I had composed a soliloquy for Alto Saxophone around 3.5 years ago. I had also composed a solo for Horn in F more than 5 years ago. These "Three Sententiae for Saxophone and Horn, Op. 289" are composed in response to a call for pieces for this ensemble. I found the combination a rather challenging one to compose for. I include a title page as well as a description of the 'sententia' for those who are unfamiliar with it. The score is the transposing score, the actual pitches sounding a major sixth lower than written for the alto saxophone and a perfect fifth lower than written for the French Horn in F.
  13. This is my second composition for alto recorder, a set of three sententiae. I am submitting it as my second entry to Christian Perrotta's challenge for solo alto recorder pieces: http://www.youngcomposers.com/t34429/solo-alto-recorder-challenge/#comment-1186669797 Here is the link to my first alto recorder piece: http://www.youngcomposers.com/t34434/soliloquy-for-alto-recorder-no-1/
  14. These are my Three Sententiae for Piano Op. 284. Here is the link to my previous set of three sententiae for piano: http://www.youngcomposers.com/archive/music/listen/8050/three-sententiae-for-piano-op-262/
  15. This is my "Nine Sententiae for String Trio Op. 277". It is my 2nd composition inspired by the YC Summer 2016 Competition on the theme of Shakespeare and is my entry for that competition. It is a set of nine sententiae for string trio inspired by and intended to demonstrate the truth of the Shakespeare dictum from Hamlet (Polonius), "Brevity is the soul of wit." 'Sententia' is a form I have originated and define(d) it thus: 'Sententia' (plural: 'sententiae') is the Latin for the word 'sentence'. The Oxford dictionary defines 'sententia' as "A pithy or memorable saying, a maxim, an aphorism, an epigram; a thought, a reflection." For me a 'sententia' is a musical utterance of a thought that is complete in itself, like a sentence. It is also an utterance that finds no need for any elaboration or development. Hence my sententiae are short pieces that come in sets and are often related to each other in some way. I have also provided the extended context of the Shakespeare Hamlet quotation in the PDF of this description. I hope that these sententiae that are in fact themselves examples of a form based on brevity have succeeded in demonstrating that famous Shakespeare quotation. I fully believe it, as demonstrated by my development of the form of the "sententia", and was inspired by this Shakespeare quotation to compose nine of my best sententiae. As is usual with my sententiae, they are brief. But in tribute to this great Shakespeare quotation occasioning them, I have taken extra care to ensure that they are pregnant with meaning and witty in their brevity! I am aware that composing to "demonstrate" such a quotation exposes me to being judged by it, by the principle that it proclaims. But I hope that I have succeeded to meet the challenge in these nine sententiae! I think that this Shakespeare dictum is unique in that it itself demonstrates what it proclaims, the truth it declares. It is witty in its brevity! It sets out a profound truth about wit, wisdom, insight, cleverness, intellect, intelligence, and/or humour (to use some of the synonyms/connotations of 'wit') in the briefest possible way!
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