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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/21/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Hi all, So, I've been away from this site for a few years - long enough that I find it has changed and my profile is completely empty! It's time to change that. In February, I had the opportunity to perform a recital of my own works, this trio among them. My colleagues and I decided afterwards that it would be worth the trouble to do a house recording of it. This is the result. My personal musical preferences lie squarely in the conservative German branch of the 19th century, and I've always believed that a composer should write the sort of music he or she likes to hear. That's what you can expect from this trio with respect to form, harmony, rhythm, and so forth. It's in four movements. The first movement is a traditional sonata-allegro with slow introduction. The second movement is a scherzo and trio. The third is a theme and variations, based on a melody I wrote when I was 13 or 14 (side note - NEVER throw away the ideas you compose when you're young!) The fourth movement is rondo-like arch form. I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed performing it! I have decided against posting the score. I hate to have to take this stance, but as an essentially unknown composer, I am deeply reluctant to post my scores to an internet site that is open to the world when I know colleagues who have been victimized by thieves stealing their works and claiming them as their own. Even with a legally copyrighted work, it is stressful, time-consuming, and expensive to take these people to court. I apologize to those who would have liked to see it.
  2. 4 points
    Lately we talked about destruction of music, etc... Well, I did this piece.
  3. 4 points
    Instructor: @Monarcheon Students: max. 10 Expectations: Composers will learn about music from the contemporary/modern period, analyze it deeply, and will write music in this style. This should span over about a month and composition assignments will be used. Week 1: Bartok - form Week 2: Webern - interval set/vectors Week 3: Messiaen - rhythms/time Week 4: Cage - intro to musical philosophy AKA "real theory" Special Notes: This is our first test long-form masterclass... structured to be more like an actual class. It's a test because I don't know how many people will be interested/care. Let me know if you're interested in the comments.
  4. 4 points
    Hello, I started to write music in 2006. In 2011 received an international award for music for couple of short films. I write almost film and theatre music as well as music for listening. Here is a track from upcoming album "Excitatus". Hope you'll enjoy :)
  5. 3 points
  6. 3 points
    Put it in your "Ideas" folder and keep it for later. Actually I don't have any "ideas" folder because most of the time I just title ideas as... "idea". But my compositions folders are organized according to the period of creation (by period I mean... new level in musical development, last time I opened a new folder was after the first time an orchestra performed my piece) so they look that way: but you might consider creating an "ideas" folder. When I can't come up with a new thing I just look for a project named "idea" and start from there.
  7. 3 points
  8. 3 points
    Thanks for taking the time to listen, Willibald - I'm glad you enjoyed it. Regarding the composer competition, I certainly agree with you. I've seldom found much enjoyment in listening to mid to late 20th-century art music. The peculiar thing is that the general market is not actually especially interested in academic music. There's interest among performers and composers, but the vast majority of concert-goers would prefer listening to a Brahms, Bach, or Mozart over a Boulez, Babbitt, or Cage, for instance. Modern composers are often quite removed from this market, partly because it is incredibly difficult to gain a foothold against the established repertoire, and partly because there simply isn't enough demand for classical music to allow most composers to make a living of it. Thus, they pursue it as a hobby in the way that Ives did, while earning their living doing something else. I think what's really at play here is that most post-secondary composition instructors of the past couple of generations grew up in the academic climate of the 50s through 70s - an era that was marked by a striking intolerance for utilizing stylistic elements from past eras in an effort to advance music in the same way that all other fields were advancing - and they push their students to continue this tradition. Most composers are intelligent people, and they pride themselves on this intelligence. They do not want to be regarded as unoriginal, nor as individuals incapable of handling the complexities of highly advanced modern music. Those who did dare write more traditional music (Barber, for instance) often received scathing criticism from the proponents of the new style, and students who were not lucky enough to have an open-minded professor at school were likewise scolded for their lack of originality. This peer pressure can be extremely persuasive, and in my opinion is the primary reason that avant garde styles came to dominate the art music world. Unfortunately, this played a significant role in killing off demand for serious art music (which was seen as necessary by many of the chief proponents of the avant garde movement). The effects are still very much present to this day. A few years ago when I was checking in here more regularly, I remember seeing numerous examples of composers in this forum posting nicely written music in traditional styles who were admonished that they should be "finding a fresh, original voice" rather than imitating styles of the past. Invariably, these detractors were modernists, and ironically, their music was seldom any more creative or original than the composers they scorned - they were just imitating a somewhat more recent style of music. The idea they persisted in advancing - that one MUST employ the tools of the modern era in order for his or her music to be relevant to the modern era - always struck me as deeply flawed. If older musical styles are no longer relevant, why do we still listen to and adore them? Why are they still, to this day, more popular among the concert-going public than modern art music styles? The argument only makes sense if one feels that the primary purpose of music is to advance and evolve. All that said, it also makes no sense to me that anyone would claim the world would be better off had avant garde music never been explored. There are some musicians who genuinely believe that this is the most beautiful and expressive music in the world, and they should not be scorned for it. There are also many who find a real sense of fascination and intellectual fulfillment in the process of writing in serialist, aleatoric, and other avant garde styles. I actually think that for many of them, that is of much more importance and relevance than the resulting sound. And there can be no denying that such music is a greater communicator of certain emotions than the tonal system could be. I suppose, in a nutshell, that I wish people would stop trying to pressure each other into writing in their own preferred style. Write what you enjoy - not what you're told you should write. Unless, of course, you make a living writing music for other people, in which case what you write should probably be something they want to hear. :-)
  9. 3 points
    First of all, great that you want to learn to compose! I can share my composing advice. When I started to compose, which is circa 2,5 years ago, I did not know anything about music theory. I did play saxophone and I learnt to play keyboard. So, I was familiar with reading notes and chords, but harmony, form, counterpoint etc. were terms I never had heard of. To be clear: my first compositions were garbage, but I am so glad that I wrote them. Every 'mistake' you make, will help you with composing the next piece. Experience and doing it is the key. I started to imitate and copy Mozart's first minuets so that I became familiar with standard forms and harmony. Furthermore, I listened to all kinds of music. Since you say that you already have some knowledge of theory, I think you should just start composing. When you do not like the result, do not delete it, but look why you do not like it and what you could change so that you will like it. Good luck!
  10. 3 points
    Little fantasy adventure piece I never posted. I hope you guys enjoy it!
  11. 3 points
    It's interesting to me that composing isn't something more people are encouraged to do. Think of how young you were the first time you drew or painted. What grade were you in when you wrote your first story? You didn't just look at other people's art and listen to stories others had written, it was expected that you would like to make your own as well. We spend a lot of time exposing small children to music, and fortunate ones also learn to play music, but not many are given any tools or guidance to compose their own. And yet all preschoolers make up their own songs and sing them without a second thought. So I have a question for you. Why do so many people NOT compose? Why do I create music? Why not? When the tune comes easily and all I have to do is write it all down, I'm frantic to write it out before I forget something. When I have an idea of something specific that I want to do, but I don't quite know how to achieve it, composing feels more like solving a very difficult puzzle. I try lots of possibilities, very diligently, and may change my mind several times. It usually takes me between a week and a month to complete a three-minute piece because I like to put it away, clear my brain, and come back to listen to it again with fresh ears to be sure I still like all my decisions.
  12. 3 points
    Hi everyone! I just released my debut piano album on 25th of October, so it´s still very fresh. It contains 10 of my original compositions and 1 re-make of an 80´s pop song which I´ve made on a request of the artist himself. Please take a listen to the full album here and let me know how you like it! If anyone would be interested, you can buy the album here: https://oliverbohovic.bandcamp.com/album/ballerina
  13. 3 points
  14. 3 points
    I think i'm finished with this one although unsure about the ending. I wanted to write something a bit faster than I normally would. I don't have the score as Logic is terrible for that. Enjoy and comments welcome as per. Any feedback really is welcome, good or bad.
  15. 3 points
    Hi, I'm a composer student from Spain. I would like to present my composition for my own video. I'm in a project to create videos and music during my year in Helsinki. Im not hapy at all about the quality of the sound, but anyway, this is my video:
  16. 3 points
    When I visit a member's profile, it would be nice, I think, to see a list of links to that person's music, that is, to pieces previously posted on this site.
  17. 3 points
    This prelude was inspired by an autumn walk. Any kind of criticism is welcome! Prelude 1 Op.2.mp3
  18. 3 points
    A short piece for solo piano, basically a variation of the same theme in 2 parts, separated by the change of dynamics.
  19. 3 points
    Greetings YC Family! It's been a long time since I made a post and visited the forum. For those of you who may recognize me, you know that I was once an administrator on this site. My years on here have aided me in my ventures within the past decade. One of these ventures was the setup and creation of an online radio station devoted solely to promoting the works of new and emerging composers. This post, thus, serves two purposes: 1. To promote Et Lux Radio and encourage each and everyone of you to listen to the music of your peers as it is broadcast 24/7. and... 2. Make a formal call for live, or rendered, recordings of your works along with a signed affidavit giving Et Lux Radio permission to include the works within its broadcast. Submitted recordings need to be downloadable and in .mp3 format. They can be for any instrumentation and must be under 25 mins in length. Please include in your submission a brief biography and any related program notes for your works. Submissions can be emailed to jaowoodr@gmail.com! Thanks and I look forward to hearing your works!
  20. 3 points
    I could also write about some of our history, which could be quite interesting. We'd need to get a few of our old guard members on board to help though.
  21. 3 points
    This is Wildflowers, one of my original compositions! Thanks for checking it out, feel free to comment questions or feedback. :)
  22. 3 points
    This is what happens when you have to write daily pieces and you get bored with writing crap. I'm quite proud of this work, even though it may not be conventional in any sense of the word. I hope you enjoy this one!
  23. 3 points
    This piece was supposed to be an introit or "requiem" movement to a requiem I was writing until I realized I hate writing with established formats (i.e. symphony, sonata, etc.) so this piece remains as is. As such, the final buildup was planned to up an octave and take two phrases instead of one to descend the second time through, but I never wrote a "second time through" so what's here is what's here. Enjoy!
  24. 3 points
    I have had the good fortune to live on Central Park in New York for six years. I’ve had the place all to myself in the winter and have had to share it with tourists in the summer. It has many points of interest, such that each are singular and need no colorful qualification. There is The Lake, The Pond, The Meer and The Beach (yes, the park has a real beach). The Sheep Meadow, The Bridal Path, The Boathouse, and so on. One of each. And the Carousel. That too, unique, except for the children who are always the same at five years old. Their mothers bring them here to go around on the wooden horses as the motor cranks up and up and up and the jangly circus music begins, and all the many little hearts that beat so fast in their fearless joy … I wanted to share this little vignette with you. Sorry, no score, but I can give you the instrumentation. 2 clarinets, 1 bassoon, 1 Horn in F, Bb trumpet, piano, harp, glockenspiel and strings.
  25. 2 points
  26. 2 points
    There is a legend about a dialogue between Mozart and a young composer that went something like this: Young Composer: "Herr Mozart, I am thinking of writing a symphony. How should I get started?" Mozart: "A symphony is a very complex musical form and you are still young. Perhaps you should start with something simpler." Young Composer: "But Herr Mozart, you were writing symphonies when you were 8 years old!" Mozart: "Yes, but I didn’t have to ask how." This story is almost certainly apocryphal, but that doesn’t mean it is not very much the truth. You’re probably going to think I’m not being very helpful, and I’m usually very positive and encouraging; but I don’t believe there is anything anyone can tell you here that is going to edify you sufficiently that you’ll know how to write something as complex as a piano concerto upon reading it. As demonstrated above, If you have to ask how to write something, you’re not ready to write it. As Mozart may or may not have done with his young friend, I would urge you to try and write simpler things first before trying to tackle a piano concerto. I read elsewhere that you’re only 13 years old, and you have only been composing for a year and a half. Give yourself some time writing smaller things before trying this. You’ll know when you’re ready to move on to bigger things. However, since nothing I say is likely to stop you if you have your mind set on trying to build Hoover Dam with a box of Lego, as it were, @aMusicComposer has given you some wisdom about not expecting too much from your first effort (with which I concur), as well as some good advice about studying a book on orchestration – and Rimsky-Korsakov’s is a great one for what you seem to be envisioning. As for planning in advance, it appears you already know something of what you want to do as far as basic things like key, metre, tempo, and instrumentation go. Now all you need are some ideas, and no one can teach you how to come up with those. Good luck to you, and keep us informed of your progress!
  27. 2 points
    I think one of the best things that helps to write music is listening to music and watching the score at the same time (in youtube you can find almost anythinthing). That's the way you learn how to write what you hear.
  28. 2 points
    I don't have much time, here are two things I noticed: 1. Your dynamics should have a sharper change. It never moves above F or below MP. If you want a static piece (it should be a static dance I think?) then fine, but keep that in mind. 2. A waltz, as far as I know, should be in 3/4. Look what you did: For many years I didn't know the difference between 6/8 and 3/4. After all, in maths, 6/8 and 3/4... are the same thing! But here it's different. Look at the way the bar is separated. 6/8 separates it to two threes, while 3/4 separates it to three twos. It also sounds like 3/4. So- change the time signature to 3/4 and the way the eights are separated into three groups of two instead two groups of three. Good luck.
  29. 2 points
    Hi all! Home Economics doesn't exist anymore and The Food Network makes it look like you can't fry an egg without granite countertops, truffle oil, and a degree from culinary school. I thought I would take a basic recipe and turn it into an ear-worm. With any luck, the members of any choir that sings this and a good number of the people in the audience will remember how to make lentil soup forever. The pianist has to deal with accidentals and an irritating key signature, but the choral parts should sit comfortably for everyone, be easy to read, and it repeats, which should be user-friendly for high school chorus or amateur choral groups. How does this look? Thanks for taking a look!
  30. 2 points
    Something good always happens on a Thursday. It's been a hard work week, and I'm a little dried up. Nevertheless, I managed to compose something in the hot evenings. I'm excited about how this piece is coming along, and therefore I want to step carefully. I've decided to let you guys share your thoughts on how this might go on, or critique what's already there. It would be heartily appreciated 😀 I think it sounds like a parade due to the rhythm and the sectionality; unfortunately that's not a word in English. Note 1: The "end" is weird; I'm aware. It's a work in progress, and the very last part is just meant to suggest the bed of some kind of bridge (contrasting part) perhaps to come. Note 2: This was made with Sample Modeling strings and flutes, Orange Tree Samples nylon guitar, and some built-in Kontakt basses and percussion.
  31. 2 points
    A short Horn Quartet inspired by hunting music with a mixture of Waltz light music. Any criticism and opinions are welcomed
  32. 2 points
    The worst thing about choral music mockups is that, unlike instrumental music, the digital rendering makes no attempt to even sound natural. That makes following the score a must. Fortunately, you did - thus making possible a detailed review by an experienced choral composer such as Pate. The experience of listening to your work - or rather, to imagine it sung as it should - is pretty cool. You strived towards simplicity, and audiences will thank you for that in a choral environment. Granted, I love polyphony very much, but sometimes I just want to understand whatever is being sung, and it's already tough enough when the lyrics are in a language I'm not fluent at, such as German, Russian or Latin. So I must say I'm really satisfied that you went out to polish your music without disregarding your audience. Thanks for your work!
  33. 2 points
    10 minute sketch of the snowfall that happened here last night.
  34. 2 points
    Here's a short yet epic arrangement of Song of Time from the Legend of Zelda series I'm working on :) Please, do not hesitate to let me know what you guys think! Edit: Nearly finished!
  35. 2 points
    Hi everyone!!! This was one of my first works i 've done in the past few years and i would be very very glad to share it with you There are two parts: the first one, from 00:00 sec to 03:44 sec & the second part from 03:44 sec to the end of this track. This part (the second) took me over 3 months to find the right notes of this -orchestral strings- melodic uplift. This music includes Chorals, vocals, orchestral strings, piano and xylophones. Thank you for listening! -Ampnoe's-
  36. 2 points
    If I composed this for an 8-bit-styled action-platforming game (Super Mario or Mega Man...), and if the background was a large city (i.e. Seoul, San Francisco, Taipei), here's what I'd compose. Swingin'. I actually thought of this as a Mega Man level where Mega Man actually takes out the evil robots in this city background.
  37. 2 points
    This is a Christmas carol for SATB chorus, based on William Shakespeare's poem "Song of the Holly"
  38. 2 points
    Do not think that you are an idiot. Everybody makes mistakes, so we would all be either idiots or normal humans. As long as we learn from the mistakes, everything is fine. The music is great!
  39. 2 points
    What would you like to know about slurs and bow directions? As a cellist, I don't always perform the markings on the page, but bow markings and slurs can inform how I shape a phrase or build the atmosphere of a piece. So when you write articulation, first worry about phrasing--then, you can worry about the practicality of each marking. While there is no single correct way to articulate music for bowed instruments, some things are simply more convenient. For example, if you want a crescendo over the course of many notes, slur those notes and make it an up bow. Conversely, if you want a diminuendo, make it a down bow. If you want rapid staccato notes, you can write up-bow staccato (write a slur over a series of staccato notes and make it an up bow) or simply write separate notes. I think the last thing to keep in mind is this: the bow is to a string player as breath is to a singer. If you are wondering how many notes to put on one bow, try to sing it! If you find yourself out of breath, you may want to switch directions with the bow. But skilled players can express phrasing effectively even while having to change bows--Brahms certainly takes advantage of this when writing his string parts. In the attached picture, notice that the upbeats (normally played with up-bows in other pieces) are played with down-bows in this excerpt to accommodate the crescendo starting in the next measure. To truly learn about writing for bowed string instruments, you have to be able to think like a string player. Listen to recordings while following along scores and string parts, and you should be good to go!
  40. 2 points
    @Rabbival507 https://youtu.be/LnKJpYGCLsg?t=1340 Linked at the organ part. @bkho, if you're struggling with being objective about your own works, it helps to do a thorough harmonic and Schenkerian analysis, to see where your pieces miss notes and thematic development respectively. If they can withstand that, then they work in at least one way.
  41. 2 points
    https://musescore.com/user/12518851/scores/4742266 The first movement is in the other uploaded works (called "Forewarning"). All feedback is appreciated!
  42. 2 points
    Hello, I composed this little piece in response to a challenge on the forum to write for a combination of two instruments based on your birthday date. At the same time, I used this piece for an exercise, I gave myself: write a piece in less than 15 minutes. My combination was the Violin and the Horn (in F). I tried to keep the atmosphere very light, yet interesting. The music has to be funny, because it is a 'birthday song,' so therefore the Allegro scherzando and no very heavy harmonies. Sharing your thoughts is very appreciated! Maarten
  43. 2 points
    This is my entry for the forum's summer competition. The 4 pieces in the suite are based on the following abstract expressionist art: 'Vir Heroicus Sublimis' by Barnett Newman https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79250 'Autumn Rhythm' by Jackson Pollock http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/57.92/ 'PH-129' by Clyfford Still https://clyffordstillmuseum.org/object/ph-129/ 'Landscape at Stanton Street' by Willem de Kooning http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kooning-landscape-at-stanton-street-p77158 Here are the score-videos for each the pieces. 'Vir Heroicus Sublimis' https://youtu.be/q9g-3ff7m24 (for this piece, I'd strongly recommend reading the program note at the beginning of the video before listening to it) 'Autumn Rhythm' https://youtu.be/vTQBn4VWz4c 'PH-129' https://youtu.be/IgPXB1T1cRg 'Landscape at Stanton Street' https://youtu.be/iB8_38S7jdY There's also a YouTube playlist of all the score-videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5bWnXp9PjtS8mePM3xsTz5ebT3z8ZxWp NB: The full program note is in the pdf score.
  44. 2 points
    Hi :D Here i've got something with athmosphere of virgin valley. I wanted to has it as a short intro, like exploration suite in the game. Some kind of stronger ambient, but the main target was to achieve emotional aura and feeling of this beautiful land. I'm very interesting about your opinion with this super-easy short arrangement, melody and harmony. :) Hope You like it! >> Youtube - Primeval Valley <<
  45. 2 points
    Hey people would love some feedback on this track :) please criticize the crap out of it if you want - anything is welcome. Thanks guys, your input has shaped my composing more than i can express and I appreciate and value every word of it.
  46. 2 points
    I was randomly bored, and an idea came out of nowhere to my mind. A collaboration of multi-genres! The idea is, every composer taking part will create a small composition that fits with the theme of the full composition. The combination of different genres might not always sound like a decent idea, but it can work. And with the skills of the composers in this forum it can work very well.. but we encounter an issue which is the difference of tools used.. Therefore, lots of mixing and editing will have to go into this (I can do that, unless anyone feels they're more capable.. I'm not the best at it), it won't be an easy project unless we want some crappy result. Based on the number of participants the segments will be divided. Also the full length of the composition will be voted on once there's a decent number of participants of about 4 or more. So basically, I'll have to start the composition, giving a general idea on the theme to be followed, for example.. grief.. victory.. relief.. misery.. etc... But before that, what are you opinions of this idea? Participants @Maarten Bauer @Monarcheon @ilv
  47. 2 points
    Who told you that you cannot sing or is it your own opinion? If you love to sing, sing! Listening to all kinds of music (Popular, Jazz, Reggae, Classical etc.) is very important too. Try to figure out why the music sounds the way it sounds and why it contains the emotions you feel. Which chords are used and what is its effect? Which instruments? Which rhythm? Which dynamics? Acoustic or electric? And so forth.
  48. 2 points
    I wrote a piece for my orchestra director a while back as our graduating class left his instruction and I was so awful at modulations. Like, they work, but they're embarrassing. The standard issues like modulation and crossed voices are here sometimes, but generally I think the classical nature of it works, but it's too docile for the energy I see in the orchestration. I think you can also spend time on dynamics more; it's really vague and/or general when some of your lines don't exactly lend themselves to interpretation as easily.
  49. 2 points
    Wow. What a great, nice job. This Form works fine with this language. And I think you've fulfilled the expectations of the Mosaic Form (every part is part of a cointinuum with no beginning-no end). I'm glad you've used this contemporary harmony. Very well balanced, it's modern enough but it has also a classic feeling. I suppose you studied that Stravinsky's symphony... The score is full of indication, as it has to be. Congrats! I love it.
  50. 2 points
    To me it sounds like film music, from an old movie. It is nice, relaxing music. Try to search it here: http://www.musipedia.org/
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