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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, I've not posted anything here for quite a while, been busy with other things, but I've also been working to finish my first fully orchestrated piano concerto. The first movement was posted here about a year ago, but the second and third movements are new. The first movement has also been edited and hopefully improved as I added a short cadenza that I felt was missing from the first movement, as well as changing the odd passage here and there. Anyway, I'm pretty pleased with the final edit. As always, any comments are welcome and gratefully received.
  2. 4 points
    Hi all, So, I've been away from this site for a few years - long enough that I find it has changed and my profile is completely empty! It's time to change that. In February, I had the opportunity to perform a recital of my own works, this trio among them. My colleagues and I decided afterwards that it would be worth the trouble to do a house recording of it. This is the result. My personal musical preferences lie squarely in the conservative German branch of the 19th century, and I've always believed that a composer should write the sort of music he or she likes to hear. That's what you can expect from this trio with respect to form, harmony, rhythm, and so forth. It's in four movements. The first movement is a traditional sonata-allegro with slow introduction. The second movement is a scherzo and trio. The third is a theme and variations, based on a melody I wrote when I was 13 or 14 (side note - NEVER throw away the ideas you compose when you're young!) The fourth movement is rondo-like arch form. I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed performing it! I have decided against posting the score. I hate to have to take this stance, but as an essentially unknown composer, I am deeply reluctant to post my scores to an internet site that is open to the world when I know colleagues who have been victimized by thieves stealing their works and claiming them as their own. Even with a legally copyrighted work, it is stressful, time-consuming, and expensive to take these people to court. I apologize to those who would have liked to see it.
  3. 4 points
    Lately we talked about destruction of music, etc... Well, I did this piece.
  4. 4 points
    Thanks for taking the time to listen, Willibald - I'm glad you enjoyed it. Regarding the composer competition, I certainly agree with you. I've seldom found much enjoyment in listening to mid to late 20th-century art music. The peculiar thing is that the general market is not actually especially interested in academic music. There's interest among performers and composers, but the vast majority of concert-goers would prefer listening to a Brahms, Bach, or Mozart over a Boulez, Babbitt, or Cage, for instance. Modern composers are often quite removed from this market, partly because it is incredibly difficult to gain a foothold against the established repertoire, and partly because there simply isn't enough demand for classical music to allow most composers to make a living of it. Thus, they pursue it as a hobby in the way that Ives did, while earning their living doing something else. I think what's really at play here is that most post-secondary composition instructors of the past couple of generations grew up in the academic climate of the 50s through 70s - an era that was marked by a striking intolerance for utilizing stylistic elements from past eras in an effort to advance music in the same way that all other fields were advancing - and they push their students to continue this tradition. Most composers are intelligent people, and they pride themselves on this intelligence. They do not want to be regarded as unoriginal, nor as individuals incapable of handling the complexities of highly advanced modern music. Those who did dare write more traditional music (Barber, for instance) often received scathing criticism from the proponents of the new style, and students who were not lucky enough to have an open-minded professor at school were likewise scolded for their lack of originality. This peer pressure can be extremely persuasive, and in my opinion is the primary reason that avant garde styles came to dominate the art music world. Unfortunately, this played a significant role in killing off demand for serious art music (which was seen as necessary by many of the chief proponents of the avant garde movement). The effects are still very much present to this day. A few years ago when I was checking in here more regularly, I remember seeing numerous examples of composers in this forum posting nicely written music in traditional styles who were admonished that they should be "finding a fresh, original voice" rather than imitating styles of the past. Invariably, these detractors were modernists, and ironically, their music was seldom any more creative or original than the composers they scorned - they were just imitating a somewhat more recent style of music. The idea they persisted in advancing - that one MUST employ the tools of the modern era in order for his or her music to be relevant to the modern era - always struck me as deeply flawed. If older musical styles are no longer relevant, why do we still listen to and adore them? Why are they still, to this day, more popular among the concert-going public than modern art music styles? The argument only makes sense if one feels that the primary purpose of music is to advance and evolve. All that said, it also makes no sense to me that anyone would claim the world would be better off had avant garde music never been explored. There are some musicians who genuinely believe that this is the most beautiful and expressive music in the world, and they should not be scorned for it. There are also many who find a real sense of fascination and intellectual fulfillment in the process of writing in serialist, aleatoric, and other avant garde styles. I actually think that for many of them, that is of much more importance and relevance than the resulting sound. And there can be no denying that such music is a greater communicator of certain emotions than the tonal system could be. I suppose, in a nutshell, that I wish people would stop trying to pressure each other into writing in their own preferred style. Write what you enjoy - not what you're told you should write. Unless, of course, you make a living writing music for other people, in which case what you write should probably be something they want to hear. :-)
  5. 4 points
    Instructor: @Monarcheon Students: max. 10 Expectations: Composers will learn about music from the contemporary/modern period, analyze it deeply, and will write music in this style. This should span over about a month and composition assignments will be used. Week 1: Bartok - form Week 2: Webern - interval set/vectors Week 3: Messiaen - rhythms/time Week 4: Cage - intro to musical philosophy AKA "real theory" Special Notes: This is our first test long-form masterclass... structured to be more like an actual class. It's a test because I don't know how many people will be interested/care. Let me know if you're interested in the comments.
  6. 4 points
    Hello, I started to write music in 2006. In 2011 received an international award for music for couple of short films. I write almost film and theatre music as well as music for listening. Here is a track from upcoming album "Excitatus". Hope you'll enjoy :)
  7. 3 points
    The difficulty is that when trying to be original, you have no control over what your contemporaries are doing. Ideas don't appear out of a vacuum. We are all the products of our cumulative experiences. So it's very likely that the same influences that nudge you towards writing a certain kind of music are acting on other composers in the same way. There are a LOT of people on the planet at this point in history, and it ends up being a numbers game. And today we live in a globally connected world. We don't have the comfort of long periods of musical isolation from the neighboring cathedral towns or royal courts while we gather our thoughts and develop our ideas. If you're working on it, someone else is going to hear about it. If someone else is working on it, it's hard to stop their ideas from leaking into your inner soundscape. We also have no control over what happens after us. Trying to strategize the best direction for your music now, in the context of music history two hundred years from now, is a pretty impossible task. If you've got the foresight to solve that one, can you please stop pursuing composing and sort out world peace instead? What seems original now may completely miss the boat for what ends up being significant. I say, just write what you like. One of the best predictors of being important to the direction of music in your time is to write enough music to get good, and to get good enough to be performed, filed away in music libraries, and passed around to other musicians so you can influence other people. If you hate what you are writing, you won't be able to stick around long enough to get good. You'll quit before you get started. So compose music that you find moving, don't quit to spend your free time watching TV, and if you are very lucky, you may stumble on something original enough to move the gears of progress a notch.
  8. 3 points
    Hi all! I'm new here, and I really wish I'd discovered this community much sooner! I love classical music but, as a violist, my largest complaint has been the lack of stirring, cinematic viola concerti. Well, what's a composer to do? So here's my stab at a full-length viola concerto. I've named it Yfirsést (pronounced ih-ver-syest), the Icelandic word for "overlooked," and an all-too common feeling among violists. This is the first movement, and it resounds with the struggle of overcoming mediocrity and being seen for what you are. (I couldn't tell you what composer it sounds like, because to me, it sounds like me. 🙂) I appreciate your feedback, and especially taking the time to listen! I'll upload the second and third movements (along with the scores for all 3) later.
  9. 3 points
    Some short pieces. Six Piano Pieces.pdf 01 Aeolian (Winds).mp3 02 The Hummingbird's Phrygian Flight.mp3 03 Quick Diminished Changes.mp3 04 Can We Be Friends.mp3 05 Longing Worlds.mp3 06 Gemini II.mp3
  10. 3 points
    I've got one more sonata to share here. This is a 2015 composition. It was performed as part of my trio performance in 2018, but we didn't get around to making a house recording of it, so the performance will have to do in spite of some shortcomings in both the performance and recording. Remembering that the balance was piano-heavy in the violin sonata I had played in the same venue some years earlier, I placed the recorder quite close to the cello this time. Too close, as it turns out. One of these times I'll get it right; this seems to be a difficult venue to record in, despite the excellent live acoustics. For those expecting some modern elements in my writing, you'll note that there are a number of aleatoric elements, including but not limited to baby cries, pages shuffling, various weird noises, an early entry, and some wrong notes (all completely intentional, of course). The piece itself is in three movements. The first is a rather slow, brooding sonata-allegro. The second is an ABABA rondoish form with alternating slow and quick segments, and the final movement is also best described as a rondo, though it doesn't cleanly match the standard 5-part or 7-part form of Classical period works. It's one of my darker works and likely not as appealing as other things I've written, but I've finally decided I like it enough to share it here.
  11. 3 points
  12. 3 points
    Put it in your "Ideas" folder and keep it for later. Actually I don't have any "ideas" folder because most of the time I just title ideas as... "idea". But my compositions folders are organized according to the period of creation (by period I mean... new level in musical development, last time I opened a new folder was after the first time an orchestra performed my piece) so they look that way: but you might consider creating an "ideas" folder. When I can't come up with a new thing I just look for a project named "idea" and start from there.
  13. 3 points
  14. 3 points
    First of all, great that you want to learn to compose! I can share my composing advice. When I started to compose, which is circa 2,5 years ago, I did not know anything about music theory. I did play saxophone and I learnt to play keyboard. So, I was familiar with reading notes and chords, but harmony, form, counterpoint etc. were terms I never had heard of. To be clear: my first compositions were garbage, but I am so glad that I wrote them. Every 'mistake' you make, will help you with composing the next piece. Experience and doing it is the key. I started to imitate and copy Mozart's first minuets so that I became familiar with standard forms and harmony. Furthermore, I listened to all kinds of music. Since you say that you already have some knowledge of theory, I think you should just start composing. When you do not like the result, do not delete it, but look why you do not like it and what you could change so that you will like it. Good luck!
  15. 3 points
    Little fantasy adventure piece I never posted. I hope you guys enjoy it!
  16. 3 points
    It's interesting to me that composing isn't something more people are encouraged to do. Think of how young you were the first time you drew or painted. What grade were you in when you wrote your first story? You didn't just look at other people's art and listen to stories others had written, it was expected that you would like to make your own as well. We spend a lot of time exposing small children to music, and fortunate ones also learn to play music, but not many are given any tools or guidance to compose their own. And yet all preschoolers make up their own songs and sing them without a second thought. So I have a question for you. Why do so many people NOT compose? Why do I create music? Why not? When the tune comes easily and all I have to do is write it all down, I'm frantic to write it out before I forget something. When I have an idea of something specific that I want to do, but I don't quite know how to achieve it, composing feels more like solving a very difficult puzzle. I try lots of possibilities, very diligently, and may change my mind several times. It usually takes me between a week and a month to complete a three-minute piece because I like to put it away, clear my brain, and come back to listen to it again with fresh ears to be sure I still like all my decisions.
  17. 3 points
    Hi everyone! I just released my debut piano album on 25th of October, so it´s still very fresh. It contains 10 of my original compositions and 1 re-make of an 80´s pop song which I´ve made on a request of the artist himself. Please take a listen to the full album here and let me know how you like it! If anyone would be interested, you can buy the album here: https://oliverbohovic.bandcamp.com/album/ballerina
  18. 3 points
  19. 3 points
    I think i'm finished with this one although unsure about the ending. I wanted to write something a bit faster than I normally would. I don't have the score as Logic is terrible for that. Enjoy and comments welcome as per. Any feedback really is welcome, good or bad.
  20. 3 points
    Hi, I'm a composer student from Spain. I would like to present my composition for my own video. I'm in a project to create videos and music during my year in Helsinki. Im not hapy at all about the quality of the sound, but anyway, this is my video:
  21. 3 points
    When I visit a member's profile, it would be nice, I think, to see a list of links to that person's music, that is, to pieces previously posted on this site.
  22. 3 points
    This prelude was inspired by an autumn walk. Any kind of criticism is welcome! Prelude 1 Op.2.mp3
  23. 3 points
    A short piece for solo piano, basically a variation of the same theme in 2 parts, separated by the change of dynamics.
  24. 2 points
    This is a concertino I wrote specifically for a youth chamber orchestra. Although it's not a perfect performance, I was very pleased with the results considering the amount of rehearsal time they had. This is my personal recording of the piece from my place in the audience, so I do apologize for the fuzziness and the whispers going on around me. The name means 'Boreal Song' or 'Song of the North.' Though I generally prefer to convey my musical ideas through chord structures, this piece is more lyrical than my normal wont. There are 2 major themes and a number of motifs throughout. The piece was designed to represent the struggle of spring overcoming winter, so I hope you can hear that in the tense passages and deep yearnings of the solo cello. As always, feedback is welcome! Edit: @Maarten Bauer I just saw you put up a piece performed by a youth orchestra, too, so now it looks like I'm trying to one-up you! That wasn't my intent at all, so everyone please go listen to Maarten's piece, too!
  25. 2 points
    Composition completed on 11/24/2015 You also can watch this piece here -
  26. 2 points
    I don't know how much music history you've studied up to this point, but this whole notion of material-based originality came from the genesis of the Romantic era, where the advancement of middle-class music making along with the general advancement of music printing/publishing combined. Composers started using super fancy/exotic-sounding titles and used increased harmonic changes to be more expressive and have their pick at the newly free market. I'll elaborate on my own opinions/answer more of the proposed questions if this discussion gets more lively, but I'm more a fan of the way the Classical era dealt with originality, where quality was based upon how well you could use old forms and conventions in your own style/ways. It doesn't sound very modern to us because it was their styles, but Haydn's and Beethoven's music were pretty novel when they were written. The modern era has taken this Romantic ideal of expression and newness to its extreme, trying to push progress without having the patience for it. The elitism and high-artness of modern classical music generally glosses over the music most people will listen to; how subtle its changes are to formulas, but how effectively catchy the songs are. Maybe my thoughts on this will change over time.
  27. 2 points
    Hello, I wanted to write som court music, so here is my little fugue for 2 trumpets and 2 trombones in c major. Please telle med what you think! SimenN
  28. 2 points
    Emanuel, please do not promote your track in my post!
  29. 2 points
    Movements: 1. Kyrie 2. Gloria 3. Sanctus 4. Benedictus 5. Agnus Dei Scoring: Mixed chorus a cappella (SATB) Style: Baroque stile antico, circa 1700 Composed: June 23 – July 9, 2014 at Wichita, Kansas, USA I here present my second attempt at a Missa Brevis. This one is a cappella, and in the Dorian mode throughout. The first was composed in 2000, modeled after the short Masses Mozart wrote for Salzburg Cathedral in his youth; I posted it here some years ago. This work was commissioned in 2014 by a Roman Catholic church in Colorado that supports and highly values the best in traditional church music for their liturgies. A long-time friend and colleague happened to be the director of their small but well-trained choir, and he regularly programs 16th Century polyphony for them to perform during Masses. When he proposed the commission to me, he specified that I would compose a short but solemn Mass, as well as a set of Propers (the variable parts of the Mass, including the Introit, Gradual, Alleluia, Offertory, and Communion) specifically for the feast day of the church’s patroness, Our Lady of Mount Carmel; he further stipulated that ideally the work would emulate Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611) – his favourite composer – in style and substance. Flattered that he thought highly enough of me to think that I was capable of this, my response was that the style would be a tall order – Victoria was one of the giants of Renaissance liturgical music, and not easily imitated – but that I would gladly do my best to present him with the best polyphony I could manage. My friend was satisfied with that, so we negotiated what I thought was a fairly generous stipend, and I accepted the commission. Though it was not due to be fulfilled until the following spring, I immediately set to work (I’ve rarely been one to procrastinate on a commission), though not without some trepidation; I am relatively facile in several historical styles, but I had never attempted to write 16th Century polyphony before, and I wasn’t altogether sure I would succeed. I worked diligently and completed the entire Mass in 15 days. While the final product did not disappoint me, despite having employed all my knowledge and skill, I knew I had not produced an authentic piece of 16th Century at all. Rather, I had written a solid work in stile antico. For those unfamiliar with the term, to quote Wikipedia: “Stile antico (literally "ancient style") is a term describing a manner of musical composition from the sixteenth century onwards that was historically conscious, as opposed to stile moderno, which adhered to more modern trends. It has been associated with composers of the high Baroque and early Classical periods of music, in which composers used controlled dissonance and modal effects and avoided overtly instrumental textures and lavish ornamentation, to imitate the compositional style of the late Renaissance. Stile antico was deemed appropriate in the conservative confines of church music, or as a compositional exercise as in J. J. Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum (1725), the classic textbook on strict counterpoint. Much of the music associated with this style looks to the music of Palestrina as a model.” I had done my best, so I presented the Mass to my patron, and to my relief, he was very pleased. The work was premiered by my friend’s choir at a festal Mass on July 19, 2015, the Sunday following the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (July 16) when the patronal feast was observed, on which occasion the present recording was made. The following year, I was invited to come to Colorado to join the choir in performing the Mass again, and I accepted. The appreciation of the choir and congregation for my work was most affecting – a memorable experience indeed. I hope you enjoy this little Mass, and do let me know what you think of it. I’d especially like feedback on the counterpoint from any of you out there who may be experts in the art. Thanks for your time!
  30. 2 points
    Sinfonia Concertante in C for Oboe, Bassoon, Fortepiano, Violin, Violoncello, and Orchestra. One movement in three parts: Allegro spiritoso – Andantino grazioso – Tempo primo Scoring: Flute, Principal Oboe, Oboe II, Principal Bassoon, Bassoon II, 2 Horns in C, 2 Trumpets in C, Timpani, Fortepiano, Principal Violin, Principal Violoncello, Strings Composed: January 10 - March 10, 2017 Commissioned by Billy Traylor, Director, Austin Baroque Orchestra. The Sinfonia Concertante is a form that had its heyday of popularity in the second half of the 18th Century. It is essentially a concerto for two or more solo instruments (five in this case) with orchestral accompaniment. It is considered to have emerged from the concerto grosso of the Baroque period, and is a cross-over form incorporating elements of the concerto and the symphony. Ordinarily, as with the concerto and symphony of the same period, it is in multiple movements, usually three or more. However, the present work was conceived as a single-movement work in three contiguous parts, contrasting in key and tempo (similar to an early opera overture) at the request of the commissioner, who also requested that the entire piece be less than 10 minutes long. As is often the case, all the principal players play ripieno with the orchestra when not performing a solo part, and likewise the fortepiano plays figured continuo when not soloing. The instrumentation is nearly identical to that of the Sinfonia Concertante in B-flat (1792) by Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), the addition of the concertatofortepiano being the only difference - again at the request of the commissioner - and I studied that work extensively before and during the writing of this piece. Perhaps the most famous example of this form is the Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra (1779) by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791). There is a lot going on in this piece. Not only is the form condensed, but much of the time the texture is such that there is a very active quintet layered on top of an orchestra, as if it were a chamber work and an orchestral work all at once. I found the feedback I got from the soloists during rehearsals very interesting indeed. The oboist complained that I called for E and E-flat above high-C from him, which for a skillful player should be doable even on a period Classical oboe; and in fact he cracked both of them in performance. The bassoonist was thrilled with her part, saying that what I had written was not only reasonably playable, but very idiomatic for the instrument and a lot of fun to play. The fortepianist (who played my own Peter Fisk fortepiano for the performance) had nothing to say at all, but I got a sense that perhaps his part wasn’t demanding enough, because he was often tempted to rush the tempo. The violinist and ‘cellist both got after me for taking them too high without adequate preparation, which I found very strange; being a string player myself, I know for certain that any player worth his salt should be able to jump to a high position and begin playing without having to be led up there through a series of position shifts, even in 18th Century music. At any rate, I was not persuaded by anything I heard from the players to make even the slightest change to the music, and with a knowing smile I nodded and expressed condolences where necessary, but did nothing to assuage their discomfort where there was any. It is a concerted work after all, and meant to be challenging – and if Mozart had written it, there wouldn’t have been a peep out of anyone. This work was premiered on May 26, 2018 by the Austin Baroque Orchestra – on period instruments! It was my first performance of one of my pieces to have been performed by such an ensemble, and it was most gratifying. I have been trying to get a live recording of the piece ever since, but the Director is hesitant to give it to me because there were a few mistakes made here and there. It was an excellent performance, nonetheless, but he’s a perfectionist. I’ll keep after him! In the meantime, I hope the present electronic rendering will serve. Enjoy, and by all means let me know what you think. EDIT - I managed to obtain an amateur recording of the Austin Baroque Orchestra performing this piece, so I am replacing the electronic rendering I had attached here with it. It's not the greatest quality recording, and there are more problems with the performance than I remember there being (not the least being that in this, the second performance in San Antonio, the timpani were missing), but it has electronic rendering beat, and it gives a good idea of how the piece should sound with live instruments - and instruments of the period to boot. There is a bit of silence and tuning at the beginning - just wait it out!
  31. 2 points
  32. 2 points
    This is an interesting scenario. I've done both things (written for specific people, and written stuff without anyone in mind,) and I think that the most important thing is that if you're writing for specific people, they should know and you should tell them what you're doing to some degree. You should be very familiar with what repertoire they can play well and what's their overall technical level. I've had mostly good experiences with this as people I've written things for trust me enough to let me do whatever I want, and it's worked out pretty well. However, you can't count on that being the case and it could as well be that they can put restrictions on what they want you to write, etc etc. If it's an outright paid commission, then sure it doesn't matter that much that you cater to their wishes since a job's a job, but in my experience I've always done things in a way where I have the freedom I need to do my thing first and foremost. However, I understand that may not be always possible or reasonable. The best way to go about it, in my opinion, is to write for no specific person and write what you actually just want to hear. Then, after you've written the piece, see if there are any comments on possible changes or interpretations that you may be willing to compromise on. I think this gives off the best impression of you as composer since you are sure of your work but at the same time you are open for suggestions, just remember that you are the boss in the end, with all the responsibility that entails.
  33. 2 points
    I love Mieczysław Karłowicz (1876 - 1909), he was a Polish composer and he died so young because of an avalanche when he was in mountains. I praise his Violin Concerto in A major and symphonic poem "Odwieczne pieśni". I am very glad you've put Vasily Kalinnikov on your list, if only he had lived longer... but what he already composed is amazing
  34. 2 points
    One of my most beloved preludes by the public:
  35. 2 points
    T H E E N D O F T H E W O R L D YC SUMMER COMPETITION: 2018 Welcome, everybody to the Young Composer Forum's Summer 2018 composition competition! Be it the apocalypse, the rapture, or nuclear annihilation, people throughout the years have always had concerns over the world ending in some way or another. It's exciting, and awesome, and terrifying, yet nobody knows exactly how it will come about. In particular, composers throughout the years have tried to emulate the afterlife, or this process of death (Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6, and Holst's Ode to Death, etc.) and now I'm asking you to put the fate of the entire world into your hands: how's it all going to go down? GOAL: Write a piece of any instrumentation under the theme of "the end of the world". Note that this is not a piece just about death, however you may follow one person/group of people through their experience of a dying world. You may call upon any context, inspiration, or story to make this happen (i.e. anything from the rapture to alien invasion). ELIGIBILITY: *You must be a member of the Young Composers forum in order to enter. Membership is free and found in the top right corner of the page. Sign ups for the competition will be in the comments below. Simply note that you are interested in judging or participating. *There will again be no limits to instrumentation. Extra points will not be given for smaller or larger ensembles. *The minimum length for this competition is reduced to 3 minutes, but keep in mind you'll have a lot to write about. The maximum is also reduced to 20 minutes. *You must have some sort of audio rendition accompanying your work, otherwise your entry will be disqualified. *A score is required, but is not as heavy a focus as previous competitions. If you want to enter and are not proficient at engraving, message @Monarcheon. *If you volunteer to be a judge, you may not enter as a contest participant. *Entrants should have an intermediate understanding of engraving and orchestration. *Entrants may only submit one work. SCORING: 1. Submit a piece that properly depicts the end of the world in any context. This piece should progress like a story, of sorts, not just simply the event that causes the world to perish. The relation to the source material should be clear in your music in one way or another. Since it is difficult to convey things through sound, your job is simply to convince the judges that you've thought about how to make it work. (/40) 2. The more technically based compositional aspects are judged here. These aspects include score quality (/15), audio file quality (/15), and orchestration (/15) 3. Submit a writing component explaining the context in which the world is being destroyed and explaining how your instrumentation and compositional sections depict your writing. This should include what techniques you used to demonstrate certain aspects of each, keys, styles, or anything else you feel is prudent. (/15) TOTAL: /100 Mark your entry interest by: August 1st Pieces must be submitted by (in another topic that will be posted later, not this thread): August 7th Judges must be finished grading by: August 14th PRIZES: All entrants receive detailed feedback on their works. The winner’s piece will be placed in the YC Competition Hall of Fame. It is possible that winners receive a full year’s subscription compensation to Sibelius, but we are still working on that (THIS FINAL PRIZE IS NOT GUARANTEED). ENTRANTS: @bkho @Youngc @Gustav Johnson @Ken320 @edfgi234 @Hugget Zukker @Noah Brode
  36. 2 points
    Hi all! Home Economics doesn't exist anymore and The Food Network makes it look like you can't fry an egg without granite countertops, truffle oil, and a degree from culinary school. I thought I would take a basic recipe and turn it into an ear-worm. With any luck, the members of any choir that sings this and a good number of the people in the audience will remember how to make lentil soup forever. The pianist has to deal with accidentals and an irritating key signature, but the choral parts should sit comfortably for everyone, be easy to read, and it repeats, which should be user-friendly for high school chorus or amateur choral groups. How does this look? Thanks for taking a look!
  37. 2 points
    The general atmosphere (more in the slow parts) is unique, I like the "dirty" sound of the chords.
  38. 2 points
    This is what Hans Zimmer would sound like if he ever got out of D minor.
  39. 2 points
    It is playable without too many difficulties:) Those double-stops are easily doable in the first position. Moreover, all chords here are in an octave, which is within the normal range (ninth and tenth are plausible but requires more skills to play) To be precise, the fingerings are as follows,
  40. 2 points
    Hi all, this is my orchstral piece. I hope you like it. Feedback is very welcome (Also on the video I made, accompanying the music). Score:
  41. 2 points
    "Denn alles Fleisch ist wie Gras und alle Herrlichkeit des Menschen wie des Grases Blumen. Das Gras ist verdorret und die Blume abgefallen." "I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down into the grass, how to kneel in the grass, how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields which is what I have been doing all day. Tell me, what else should I have done? Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon? Tell me, what is it you plan to do With your one wild and precious life?" -Mary Oliver
  42. 2 points
    If I composed this for an 8-bit-styled action-platforming game (Super Mario or Mega Man...), and if the background was a large city (i.e. Seoul, San Francisco, Taipei), here's what I'd compose. Swingin'. I actually thought of this as a Mega Man level where Mega Man actually takes out the evil robots in this city background.
  43. 2 points
    Just know basic music writing/theory/rhythm skills. Be ready to have an open mind, as the subjects will get advanced quite quick. For everyone else, I'm going to try to aim for 5 people in the class before I get started.
  44. 2 points
    Here they go. Take One Partitura completa (1).pdf Take Two Partitura completa (1).pdf
  45. 2 points
    I have no music sheet for this one. I can make one but it might take a while. It was written for a computer game so its quite repetitive. Hope you'll still enjoy it :) Please listen and give your feedback.
  46. 2 points
    I tried combining Hans Zimmer's style with Sawano Hiroyuki's for this one. The theme surrounds itself around battling an Efreet (or Ifrit), i.e. an evil spirit. This is, for now, still a work in progress I'm stuck on unfortunately. But please let me know what you guys think of it :) EDIT: It's finished!
  47. 2 points
    This is meant to be a small scene, flying over the ocean towards the final destination (final boss if you will). During the last seconds, the plane closes in on the enemy.
  48. 2 points
    Here is a piece I hope to compliment with two more pieces for a more complete sonata -- this is only the first movement. I've spent a while working on making my writing more concise for chamber settings, and once I actually write this whole piece, I plan on getting it performed and recorded. A large focus on this piece is varying textures and moods efficiently, as well as using the different motifs and melodic fragments to construct the music, concerning myself less with harmonic relationships etc. I've included a score in concert pitch, as well. Suggestions are helpful, and thanks! P.S. I attached a poem by William Carlos Williams, which helped me start the piece P.P.S. I appreciate all the comments, especially on the difficulty of the piano part, and when I finally incorporate this piece into a full sonata, I might re-evaluate certain places. The feedback helps a ton!
  49. 2 points
    This piece reflects the following story: A young woman living in a 19th Century French town finds, while exploring her family home attic, music manuscripts composed by her great-great grandfather, from northern Germany, who composed in the baroque style of his time and place. One of his two-part preludes was unfinished! The woman set out to finish the piece, trying very hard to keep to the same baroque style. But alas, her time and place shone through, and the second part of the prelude, written by her, turns out to be a romantic piece written in counterpoint. I hope you like it! :)
  50. 2 points
    Congratulations @Monarcheon and @punintentional! All other participants very well done too!
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