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Found 3 results

  1. Hello all, This is the overture to the Brian Boru cantata I posted the rest of (so far) on Choral & Vocal. As I realise posting 40-ish minutes of music in one go is rather off-putting, especially since I'm not very active on YC myself, let's take things progressively. Further informations on the subject of the cantata itself can be found in my other post, however I doubt you'll really need any as this is purely instrumental. Any kind of comments is welcome, as this is my first major orchestral work. Cheers, Marc
  2. Hello all, I have been absent for a few months, spending most of my evenings working on this project. 2014 was the thousandth anniversary of Irish High King Brian Boru's death. I decided to look his history up in detail and subsequently (around this time last year) realised it would be great material for music. I wanted to explicitly tell his story and the best way I found to do that was by means of a cantata. I wrote the libretto myself without even trying poetry and other niceties (as I said, my goal is only to get the story across, almost as if the piece was a film score). However, any comments on the text are welcome as well. The job is by no means finished, in fact I'd say this is about half the final length, but I would like to have your opinions on what it sounds like so far. Cheers, Marc
  3. Hello all, I had already posted the beginning of this project on the old site a few weeks back, but it has been substantially modified since then. In short, I am writing a cantata about the life of Brian Boru (a High King of Ireland) - the idea came about 2014, the 1000th anniversary of his death, but was only put into pratice a few months ago, libretto included. There is a bit already, but it's far from finished. :) As far as the orchestration goes, I am fairly comfortable in writing for voices as I'm a singer myself (and as such, I do realise I don't always ask easy things from them) and with flutes, though I'm not academically trained and rather play the folk instrument than the classical one. Sadly my knowledge of instruments doesn't stretch any further and although I am quite sure the ranges are correct, I am not aware of difficulties that may arise in playing. Any advice on the composition itself - including the libretto - is of course very welcome, but just as much so any comments on my orchestration. Be warned that I know the ensemble I chose to write for is not conventional, it's meant to be that way. Also be warned: I use Irish traditional instruments in this cantata (so far, an Irish flute and a tin whistle, but I'm planning for Uilleann pipes too - it is supposed to be patriotic, after all :P ) and am fully aware of how unusual it is, but their use always makes sense, for instance when a traditional tune is being played in the first part of the overture. Therefore also keep in mind I am not writing this for any reason in particular, and especially am not planning on having it performed, it's just a wild project - some write books they'll never get published, I write cantatas nobody will ever play. That being said, enjoy ! :D Cheers, Marc