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Found 50 results

  1. Here my Dies Irae from my little Requiem I'm writing. Latin text: Dies iræ, dies illa, Solvet sæclum in favilla, Teste David cum Sibylla! Quantus tremor est futurus, quando iudex est venturus, cuncta stricte discussurus! English traduction: Day of wrath, that day in wich the centuries are reduced to ashes; as witnesses King David and the Sibyl! How much terror there will be, when the judge is about to come, to judge everything strictly! Happy for feedback! Soon I will upload the score but here is the audio:
  2. I have been assigned to create(arrange) this piece, I am worried it is too dissonant and a bit too unfamiliar. I changed the instrument sounds because it is easy for me to work with any other sound than the default vocal samples. Any constructive feedback is welcome.
  3. Hi all! So, another little arrangement of mine. I have written this for my quartet. And, I found it quite challenging to get the dissonance I wanted while really only having three non-melody voices to work with. I sort of went the amoeba route, where I had close harmony surrounding the melody. This is found in barbershop music, and there is some influence there. However, I tend to take things further than a barbershop quartet would allow, which I'm super chill with. Pay no heed to the difficulty of the music, as the people singing this are true musical paragons. It is probably one of the harder arrangements of this piece out there. I'm looking specifically for comments on musical moments that stick out to you. Things that you think may not be effective or fit in the narrative of the piece. Please also look out for spots where you think there should be courtesy accidentals. I put a lot in, but I suspect there are more I'm missing. Thanks in advance for your thoughts. 🙂
  4. I'd love to hear any thoughts you have about this piece, particularly about the clarity of the piano reduction. Ideally this would be performed a cappella, but it's nice to have a piano reduction for rehearsal or in case the singers need some support. There is some part crossing between the sopranos and altos. It doesn't go out of range for anyone and I liked the way the lines flowed for each part better this way. Any enharmonics you would mark differently? Psalm 133: 1 Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! Thanks for taking the time to listen! Here's a youtube demo video with the score rolling by:
  5. Hey yc! I've been working on an SATB piece based off of Ralph Cheever Dunning's Poem called Driftwood. This is just a draft, and there's still some things i'm not happy with (and a serious lack of dynamics), but i'm hoping I can finish this piece and add it to my portfolio in a few months. :^) Please let me know what you think of this piece, and how I can improve it. Thanks. P.S. If you'd like more info, or if you want the piano version, let me know and i'll hand it over. P.P.S. If you'd like to perform this piece, please let me know. It'd be super cool to hear this with human voices!
  6. So I cannot sleep and I composed this Agus Dei. Not gonna be perfect and will continue working on it. Attached are the audio and pdf score file
  7. This is a work for SATB Choir and Piano that I wrote in 2017 for a competition. It's a moving work, and I would love to see it performed someday.
  8. Anyone have a minute to pick at my piece? Thoughts on the piano part are particularly welcome since I'm not a pianist. Thanks! Who can ascend the hill of the Lord? and who can stand in His holy place? Those who have clean hands, and a pure heart;
  9. I compose this O Magnum Mysterium just for fun lol. But I've put enough effort in it to make it sounds nice. Any advice and suggestions will be appreciated.
  10. This is a Link on this website to Shelia's post about a competition, thought I would share in this sub-forum: @pateceramics
  11. Hello all! I've been composing for quite some time now, but I'm new to this forum. It seems like a really cool place though. Here's my first Lied I've ever written, a setting of Goethe's Wandrer's Nachtlied. I got a complaint from someone else that the music is "too depressing" for the words, but I disagree with him entirely. What do you guys think? Comments on the music are also encouraged. Thanks in advance. The poem and its translation can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer's_Nightsong Also a quick note, the Gb chord in m16 is meant to function as an F# chord going to the B minor section, I just didn't want to use all those accidentals.
  12. Hi All, Just joined this place after somebody recommended it to me. I have this large choir piece that I recently wrote, and I'm wondering if anybody would like to give feedback on it? If you have an questions on what anything means, please let me know! Best Regards, Thomas Håkanson, aka Dusty
  13. Hi everyone!!! This was one of my first works i 've done in the past few years and i would be very very glad to share it with you There are two parts: the first one, from 00:00 sec to 03:44 sec & the second part from 03:44 sec to the end of this track. This part (the second) took me over 3 months to find the right notes of this -orchestral strings- melodic uplift. This music includes Chorals, vocals, orchestral strings, piano and xylophones. Thank you for listening! -Ampnoe's-
  14. Hey folks, Here is a short choir response which is a part of a larger work I am composing for my church's Easter service. Any comments are appreciated! It is Finished.mp3 It is Finished PDF Score.pdf
  15. Hi everyone! I'd like to share a choral piece I'm working on (I think it's mostly in the final stages of composition, perhaps a few notes here and there will be edited, but I think have the form/structure as I would like it.) I set one of my favorite e e cummings poems to music and just felt my way through the text and the emotions I felt while reading. I'd love to hear any critiques from people more experienced with the idiom (I'm studying composition at university, but only started 2 years ago so I am still learning things everyday!) I intend to speak with the choir directors at my university to see if they would be interested in running the piece, and if they have any advice on writing effective choral music. One of the things I am particularly worried about with this piece is the clarity of notation. There are a few parts of this piece where I was unsure of what accidentals to use (such as in the "i fear" section at bar 32) or if I spelled a chord incorrectly, as I predominantly write by ear. If anyone could shine some light on potential problems in this regard, that would be extremely helpful. Thank you in advance for any feedback! i carry your heart with me (i carry it in 12-29-17.mp3 i carry your heart with me (i carry it in 12-29-17.pdf
  16. Hello everbody, This is my first serious choral composition, which I composed to practise counterpoint and voice leading. The piece is an Ave Maria, but the language is Dutch, which made it quite hard to compose music on. It is a hard language regarding accentuation. Dutch text: Wees gegroet, Maria, vol van genade. De Heer is met U. Gij zijt de gezegende onder de vrouwen, En gezegend is Jezus, de Vrucht van Uw schoot. Heilige Maria, Moeder van God, Bid voor ons, zondaars, Nu en in het uur van onze dood. Amen. There is trouble with the audio in this topic, so here is the link: Nevertheless, I am pretty content with it. What do you think? Tips are welcome! Maarten
  17. A buddy of mine (Gareth Hearne) wrote this microtonal Sanctus in what's called "porcupine temperament", and I finally got around to making a recording of it: Similarly to how western music has a circle of fifths, Porcupine Temperament has a circle of small major seconds (approximately 160 cents wide). It approximates many intervals of the harmonic series as well or better than standard western tuning, especially the 11th harmonic. (Kind of like how barbershop singers sing their minor sevenths or augmented sixths flat to be in tune with the 7th note in the harmonic series, porcupine has a "fourth"-ish thing that lines up with the 11th note in the harmonic series and it, I think, blends very nicely!) If you have any questions on the theory I'd be happy to talk about it, thanks for listening =)
  18. Hi all, well I've just wrote this score sheet and I've just used choral, strings and also brass. I wanted to develop that in film score style. So I've just imagining an Empire collapse and what happen after dying an emperor. At result I've just develop this music. I'll be happy if see your comments. Thanks
  19. Here's a setting I recently completed of an almost-trite little poem by Bliss Carman (1861-1929). The music is considerably more complex than the words are, but this doesn't bother me--my intent was for the music to reflect the variety and contrasts between the images in the poem, and to underscore its message of strength in diversity. Do you think I succeeded? Recently, I've found I gravitate towards simpler texts for choral music. They seem to allow for a lot more flexibility and interpretation, and music can often add a much-needed extra dimension to them. How do you choose texts when writing vocal music? Also, how do you feel about the balance between choir and piano in the recording? While sample libraries (even word-building ones like Virharmonic) are nowhere near as good as a live performance, they DO allow me to tweak little details to my heart's content. Thanks for listening! SCORE AND AUDIO
  20. Ave Regina Caelorum Marian Antiphon for Lent 4 Voices a cappella (SATB) Mode: F Mixolydian Composed: 23-27 May, 2017 Style: 18th Century stile antico closely emulating Late-Renaissance, ca. 1600 Duration: 1 minute, 30 seconds Text: Ave, Regina Caelorum, Ave, Domina Angelorum: Salve, radix, salve, porta Ex qua mundo lux est orta: Gaude, Virgo gloriosa, Super omnes speciosa, Vale, o valde decora, Et pro nobis Christum exora. Translation: Hail, O Queen of Heaven. Hail, O Lady of Angels Hail! thou root, hail! thou gate From whom unto the world, a light has arisen: Rejoice, O glorious Virgin, Lovely beyond all others, Farewell, most beautiful maiden, And pray for us to Christ. Last Sunday, the director of the Schola Cantorum of St. Mary's Cathedral here in Austin, Texas was complaining to me that he was having trouble finding settings of Ave Regina Caelorum that he liked or felt were workable, and he asked me if I had any free time to write a setting for the Schola. I got inspired and by Tuesday began composing this setting, which I just finished last night. I used sixth comma meantone temperament in the recording of the rendering to better emulate the kind of tuning a choral group would probably use in this style and mode, and I used woodwind samples because clarity is lost with the wretched choral samples I have available to me. Being self-taught in this style as in almost everything else, I'm seriously concerned that I have done this according to the rules of 16th Century polyphony, as I understand them. I hope this piece is enjoyable, but by all means, if any of you notice anything in it that I may have done wrong, I'd like to know about it. Thanks!
  21. This falls squarely under the category of "what do y'all think of this?" I here present for your consideration the charming villancico "Llegad, moradores de aqueste pensil" by Spanish-born Mexican composer Francisco Martinez de la Costa (1739-1769?). The work was composed for the Solemnity of St. Peter at Oaxaca Cathedral, Mexico, sometime between 1765 and 1769, and is scored for vocal soloists, mixed chorus, trumpet, strings, and continuo (baroque guitar and portative organ, if I remember rightly). The linked recording is of a performance of this work by the Austin Baroque Orchestra and Chorus (I am a member of both) in November, 2015 at historic Mission Concepcion (1731) in San Antonio, Texas. This work has never been published, remaining in manuscript form in the archives of Oaxaca Cathedral, and this performance was probably one of the first anywhere in nearly 200 years, and almost certainly the first in the United States. The performing edition was prepared by ABO's director, Billy Traylor. For those who may not know (most of us), a villancico is a vocal work based on a specific poetical form; it usually consists of a chorus (estribillo) followed by several verses (coplas) and a final repetition of the chorus. Villancicos were extremely popular in Spain and Portugal and their Latin American colonies from the late 15th through 18th Centuries. Some are religious, like this one, but there are many secular villancicos as well. Very little is know of the life of Martinez de la Costa. He was born and trained in Spain, and by 1765 he had become maestro de capilla of Oaxaca Cathedral in the south of Mexico. In 1769 he requested a leave of absence to return to Spain to take care of some of his father's business, and was never heard from again. It is presumed he died while at sea on the voyage home. Now that you know more about villancicos and this unfortunate young Mexican composer than you ever thought you wanted, have a listen to this delightful, quirky little piece. The writing is nothing if not unique and individual. I'll be interested to know what you think. Cheers! https://soundcloud.com/austinbaroqueorchestra/llegad-moradores
  22. Hi y'all! I'm writing this for a contest (not hosted by Young Composers). I'm a band guy by nature, but choral music has always struck a special chord (haha) with me. I've spent several months on this piece, and have made some massive progress in the last few weeks. It's at a point where I would feel comfortable submitting it, but the composer's ear is biased. What do you all think works and doesn't work? For example the aleatoric stuff...? (p.s. all I did was record myself whispering nonsense - hopefully it will sound better as a large ensemble doing it!) Thanks!
  23. media-a8d40b9f.mp3 I'm senior in high school, and I'm becoming more and more interested in composition. I've taken a couple music theory classes, but beyond that, I have no idea what I'm doing. I wrote this for an English project using the text of a poem from Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. I only had 10 days to work on it, so it's far from perfect. But it's something! Poor Orphan Child (1).mid
  24. Hi folks - I was slightly active on this forum from about 2012-2014. Now that I have a little free time, I'm back to share some more music, and it's nice to see so many new members here. Although I've written extensively for all kinds of instrumental ensembles and accompanied voices, I still feel like I'm going by the seat of my pants when writing unaccompanied choir music. This is my 2nd a cappella piece, and there are still some things in it I'm not terribly fond of. In the first half of this piece, I deliberately avoided the lush, homophonic textures that seem to characterize 95% of a cappella choral pieces written today. I tried to create interest in other ways, but I'm not sure it is entirely effective (particularly the transition before letter B... does this break the piece's momentum prematurely? I can't decide). I finally gave in and wrote big, pretty chords in the 2nd half, which I'm actually satisfied with. If anyone has suggestions about making this easier, I'd be happy to hear those as well. Ideally, I'd like this to be singable by intermediate (i.e. decent high school and community) choirs. Thanks for listening! SCORE and AUDIO PS - this mockup is "performed" by Virharmonic Voices of Prague sample library. Word-building choir software is still a long way from sounding realistic, but since I don't have a live recording yet, I figure this is better than MIDI.
  25. Hello all, Here is a 2 part treble composition I wrote for Children's Chorus. The text of "When I Hear Music" was inspired by the elementary school chorus that premiered the work. Their thoughts were filled with words of hope, peace and joy. A unison version of the piece was just performed as well. Thank you all for listening! Very proud of these students!
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